Visit the Berghahn Journals online platform here! Berghahn Books Logo

berghahn New York · Oxford

Home

About us

Berghahn Journals is the journals division of Berghahn Books, an independent scholarly publisher in the humanities and social sciences. A peer-review press, Berghahn is committed to the highest academic standards and seeks to enable innovative contributions to the scholarship in its fields of specialty.

Latest

  • EnviroSociety

    Some Chemical and More-Than-Human Transformations of Sugar/Energy

    Oblivious, or maybe not, to a warming planet and intense global discourse around renewable bioeconomy futures, a tiny sugar molecule one day is synthesized and then makes its way into a cell wall of a sugarcane plant in the southern region of Brazil. This is not the type of sugar that would be found on the kitchen table. The molecule remains there for the life of the plant, offering fibrous structural support for the towering stalks as they grow up to five meters tall. This sugar compound is called cellulose and is found in all plants and several types of microbes. It is the earth’s most abundant biopolymer made on land and its largest carbon reservoir (Li et al. 2014). While not on the kitchen table per se, cellulose is likely in it (if the table is wooden).

    Laboratory greenhouse (photograph by Katie Ulrich).

    Laboratory greenhouse (photograph by Katie Ulrich).

    On a later day, a machine smashes through the sugarcane field to harvest the stalks. The sugarcane plantation’s infamous and violent history, one of colonial slavery and later continuing horrific worker conditions, is not forgotten by nor has disappeared for nearby residents, even as mechanized harvesting changes the local labor metabolism (Mintz 1985; Scheper-Hughes 1992). The harvested sugarcane stalks are transported to a processing facility not too far away, which is owned by a joint venture between Brazilian and US companies.

    At the facility, the stalks are crushed, squeezed, and subjected to chemical and physical pretreatments that begin to degrade the recalcitrant, fibrous portions of the plant. Researchers next inject a cocktail of fungal enzymes, themselves harvested from bacterial cell factories, to experiment with methods to break down cellulose and its relatives into simple, fermentable sugars. Then, yet another organism enters the story: kilograms of yeast are dumped into the vats of digested sugarcane pulp. Over the course of only a few days, as in the process of making beer or wine, the yeast consumes simple sugars and expel liters of alcohol and carbon dioxide gas in return. The mixture is hot and lively, as the release of gas exerts enough energy to agitate and stir the contents, some two kilowatts (Raghavendran et al. 2017). The ethanol produced by the yeast is then collected and later pumped into the tank of a flex-fuel car, a vehicle that can run on gasoline, ethanol, or a combination of the two.

    Taking this process, what would it mean to think closer with the conversions of energy—the changing materialities of the chemical compound of sugar—looping between the multiple beings, and states of being, involved? Sugarcane is used as a feedstock, an energy source, to generate other forms of energy, not for the plant but for certain humans. And to be more precise, it serves as an energy source for another type of being, microbial yeast, before it reaches the humans. Of course, too, sugar in another form fueled the cells of the workers who helped harvest the sugarcane in the first place. What such sugarcane-yeast-bacteria-fungus-human-machine entanglements make clear to me is that a more-than-human, multichemical ethnography can be helpful for opening up thinking on energy—its forms and transformations.

    That is, I believe it is worth tracing transformations of energy across various scales and materials, in ways that matter not only to humans but to the other beings wrapped up in these processes as well. Paying attention to energy on these different registers—energy at what scale, and for whom—can be productive for exploring when energy comes to be energy, and the kinds of relations of use figured in these moments.

    Considering energy as it emerges from cascading relations between both beings and states of being is obviously not limited to renewable fuels; after all, fossil fuels were once living and have undergone their own fascinating material and temporal transformations. Additionally, I think this approach can be especially helpful for an anthropology of emerging sugarcane biotechnologies in Brazil.

    Ethanol made from sugarcane molasses (not the cellulosic material as described above, although the molasses process still involves yeast fermentation) has been produced at a large scale since the 1970s in the country. This biofuel has propelled not only cars but also industrial discourses around Brazil as a global leader for renewable energy.

    More recently, though with advanced genetic engineering methods, research centers and biotechnology companies are aiming to engineer the very metabolism of the yeast, often with genes from other species, to produce not ethanol but your chemical of choice. Such chemicals have included drug compounds, specialty chemicals used in cosmetics and flavorings, and industrial chemicals otherwise derived from petroleum. Millions of dollars in funding from both public and private sources have been put toward such sugar biotechnologies in the past decade, in Brazil as well as abroad.

    The sugarcane plant, too, is not simply a static feedstock. Becoming more widely used is a variety of sugarcane called energy cane, which has been bred to have a higher proportion of fibrous material such as cellulose and less sucrose, the more familiar kind of sugar. Energy cane is desirable, as it has a greater overall biomass than standard sugarcane, extra biomass that can be used to produce extra ethanol or extra specialty chemicals. Energy cane can only generate more total biomass, though, because of its reduced synthesis of sucrose—which for the plant is energetically expensive. Energy thus becomes relevant for energy cane in more way than one.

    In short, sugar, not always in familiar forms, is being advanced as a feedstock for a renewable future. This future is renewable in terms of not only fuels but also the innumerable, ubiquitous commodities currently linked to fossil fuels in more invisible ways. In such future imaginaries, sugar feedstocks form the basis of a new mode of industry, one that entangles multiple (engineered) organisms, labs, and various forms of energy in new chemical and biological relations. Sugar literally energizes this future, both now and then, and in the process reconfigures energy as well as these organisms. And as Sidney Mintz (1985) was attentive to in another moment of sugar transformations, such reconfigurations are never innocent nor even; energy is extracted from someone or something in many conversions into another form.

    Ultimately, this is all to propose that in conversation with the rich anthropological work on energy and its politics, social and global relations, and political economies, paying attention as well to the more-than-human, multichemical aspects of something like emerging sugarcane biotechnologies can help expand thinking on what, when, and for whom something becomes energy (and for whom not). From cellulose in cane plants and the people who harvest them, to simple sugars fermented by yeast, to ethanol and specialty chemicals consumed by other people, returning to the naïve question of “What is energy?” could help make clear productive ways of studying new energy regimes of the twenty-first century.



    Katie Ulrich
    is a PhD student in the Department of Anthropology at Rice University. Her research interests center on the science of sugar and sugarcane in Brazil.



    References

    Li, Shundai, Logan Bashline, Lei Lei, and Ying Gu. 2014. “Cellulose Synthesis and Its Regulation.” Arabidopsis Book 12: e0169. doi:10.1199/tab.0169.

    Mintz, Sidney. 1985. Sweetness and Power: The Place of Sugar in Modern History. New York: Penguin.

    Raghavendran, Vijayendran, Thalita Peixoto Basso, Juliana Bueno da Silva, Luiz Carlos Basso, and Andreas Karoly Gombert. 2017. “A Simple Scaled Down System to Mimic the Industrial Production of First Generation Fuel Ethanol in Brazil.” Antonie van Leeuwenhoek 110 (7): 971–983. doi:10.1007/s10482-017-0868-9.

    Scheper-Hughes, Nancy. 1992. Death Without Weeping: The Violence of Everyday Life in Brazil. Berkeley: University of California Press.



    Cite as: 
    Ulrich, Katie. 2017. “Some Chemical and More-Than-Human Transformations of Sugar/Energy.” EnviroSociety, 21 June. www.envirosociety.org/2017/06/some-chemical-and-more-than-human-transformations-of-sugarenergy.

  • FocaalBlog

    Focaal Volume 2017, Issue 78: Boredom after the global financial crisis

    We are pleased to announce that the latest issue of Focaal – Journal of Global and Historical Anthropology has recently published and is available online at its new home, www.berghahnjournals.com/focaal.

    This issue’s theme section, titled “Boredom after the global financial crisis: From privelege to precarity” and guest edited by Marguerite van den Berg and Bruce O’Neill,  investigates one way in which marginalization and precarization appears: boredom. Drawing on fieldwork from postsocialist Europe and postcolonial Africa, this thematic section explores the intersection of boredom and precarity in order to gain new insight into the workings of advanced capitalism. The editors’ introduction is available to all readers for free.

    Focaal 78 also includes a regular articles section, which features articles on protest and daily life in poor South African neighborhoods; the discourse on originality in Albani’s art world;  transparency, debt, and the control of price in the Kathmandu land market; small-scale producers and the Plan Chontalpa in Tabasco, Mexico; and contrasting views from Chicago and Managua of why drug dealers still live with their moms. A book review article rounds out the issue.



    Volume 2017, Issue 78
    Boredom after the global financial crisis: From privelege to precarity

    Guest Editors: Marguerite van den Berg and Bruce O’Neill

    THEME SECTION

    Introduction: Rethinking the class politics of boredom
    Marguerite van den Berg and Bruce O’Neill

    Joyful pessimism: Marginality, disengagement, and the doing of nothing
    Martin Demant Frederiksen

    The ethnographic negative: Capturing the impress of boredom and inactivity
    Bruce O’Neill

    Too much time: Changing conceptions of boredom, progress, and the future among young men in urban Ethiopia, 2003–2015
    Daniel Mains

    ARTICLES

    “Because we are the only ones in the community!” Protest and daily life in poor South African neighborhoods
    Jérôme Tournadre

    “They don’t even know how to copy”: The discourse on originality in Albania’s art word
    Sofia Kalo

    Can a financial bubble burst if no one hears the pop? Transparency, debt, and the control of price in the Kathmandu land market
    Andrew Haxby

    Empowering or impoverishing through credit: Small-scale producers and the Plan Chontalpa in Tabasco, Mexico
    Gisela Lanzas and Matthew Whittle

    Why do drug dealers still live with their moms? Contrasting views from Chicago and Managua
    Dennis Rodgers

    REVIEW ARTICLE

    Mediations on crises and time in Southeastern Europe
    Jana Hrckova


    Recommend Focaal to your library

    As a key researcher in your field, you can recommend Focaal to your library for subscription. A form for this purpose is provided on the Focaal website here.

  • Museum Worlds

    The Black Lives Matter Movement in the National Museum of African American History and Culture

    by Rod Clare, Elon University

    museum-african-american

    It has been over forty years since the mostly successful conclusion of the Civil Rights movement in the United States. While some may have thought the election of an African-American president in 2008 heralded a “postracial” America, continued violence and oppression has brought about a rebirth of activism, embodied by the Black Lives Matter (BLM) movement. Now that nascent movement is preparing to be part of the National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC). The NMAAHC is located at 1400 Constitution Avenue NW, in Washington DC.

    The museum’s overriding goals are to make people aware of African-American history and to foster understanding and reconciliation about race in America and the world. The fact that the BLM movement is so new gives rise to concerns that the museum is collecting material that is too recent, topical, and potentially controversial. Nevertheless, as the director of the NMAAHC, Lonnie Bunch, has made clear, collecting and promoting such material helps “people to realize … that these are not isolated moments. They are part of a long history—a long history of tragedy, but also a long history of resilience and protest.”1

    Though seemingly radical, Bunch’s approach is not without precedent when it comes to museums representing African-American lives (and deaths). A recent example of this is Kehinde Wiley’s exhibit, Kehinde Wiley: A New Republic, presented from February to May 2015, at the Brooklyn Museum in New York. Superimposing modern blacks onto classical Western art reliefs, Wiley’s work made one patron comment that “the fact that they have an exhibit like this maybe could revitalize that conversation again about Black Lives Matter.”2

    A symposium on “History, Rebellion, and Reconciliation,” held at the Smithsonian in April 2015, discussed in part the fatal shooting of an African-American youth in Ferguson, Missouri, in the previous year. A reoccurring theme at the symposium was that museums could offer neutral “‘safe,’ or even ‘sacred’ spaces, within which visitors could wrestle with difficult and complex topics.”3 Currently, there is no better example of a more controversial and nuanced topic in America than the Black Lives Matter movement.

    The BLM movement, born in 2013, was indirectly created out of decades of frustration within the African-American community over the legal system’s continual exoneration of those who had taken black lives. Often, those killed had transgressed supposed spatial boundaries, an issue in the past (for example, when a black youth “strayed” into a white section of a public beach, and responses by whites instigated the Chicago riots of 1919 that took thirty-eight lives), as much as the present. BLM’s direct genesis came as a result of the not-guilty verdict against George Zimmerman, who stalked and killed Trayvon Martin, a seventeen-year-old black youth who Zimmerman thought was in the wrong part of town in Sanford, Florida. Three black women (Patrisse Cullors, Alicia Garza, and Opal Tometi), all activists in the African-American community, viewed the verdict with shock, anger, and an underlying belief that something had to be done. Due to their drive and to further instances of black lives being taken, with ensuing rebellions in cities like Ferguson, Missouri, and Baltimore, Maryland, the movement has quickly taken off. Currently the BLM movement has approximately two dozen chapters throughout the United States as well as chapters in Ghana and Canada.

    Implicit in the rise of BLM and its attendant demands and concerns is the long-standing issue of black mobility. That is, where can black people go and when can they go there? This question is not only relevant for African Americans currently but also in their arduous history in America. The idea of black mobility has been a fundamental query since African Americans were brought to America as enslaved people. As such, their movements and associations were always strictly monitored and in many cases, prohibited by laws, slave patrols, and other means. After the end of slavery, this remained the case in the South and indeed in other parts of the country well into the twentieth century through the implementation of Black Codes, Ku Klux Klan terrorism, sharecropping contracts, city zoning laws, segregation, and various other means.

    In fact, it can be said that blacks gained any semblance of true mobility in the country only in the early 1970s when the last host of Civil Rights laws became implemented and enforced. Two generations later, it is fitting that some have described the BLM protests as the new Civil Rights movement. In a sense, BLM seeks to answer the question of whether or not some fifty years later black lives are truly valued as equal to all others in the country. From the U.S. government’s COINTELPRO assassination and disruption programs against black activists in the late 1960s and 1970s to the “stop and frisk” police sweeps since the 1990s and incidents such as the arrest of Sandra Bland in 2015, the curtailment of black movement makes the answer decidedly mixed.

    The relevancy and emotions concerning the lasting effects of what has been labeled America’s “original sin” makes it a timely yet somewhat uncomfortable issue for a museum to embrace. This then begs the question, “what exactly is the purpose of a museum?” The International Council of Museums (ICOM) defines it as “a non-profit, permanent institution in the service of society and its development, open to the public, which acquires, conserves, researches, communicates and exhibits the tangible and intangible heritage of humanity and its environment for the purposes of education, study and enjoyment.”4 Most people would tend to define a museum as a place where old, if not ancient, objects are put on display to be reviewed in a genteel fashion. This might make it seem that only the elite patronize museums but nothing could be further from the truth. According to the American Alliance of Museums, some 850 million visits occur each year in American museums, more than all major organized sports put together.5

    What Lonnie Bunch, NMAAHC’s director, wants to do is bring a current and controversial topic to the most respected of American museums, the Smithsonian. As Bunch put it in an interview with National Public Radio,

    One of the jobs of a museum is to not only look back, but to look forward. And so once I heard about [the demonstrations] I knew it was very important to make sure that we collected material that might help a curator 20 years from now or 50 years from now look back and tell the story of the changing notions of race in America.6

    Some of the items Bunch prioritizes for collection include banners, posters, gas masks, and a 4’ by 7’ panel of wood used to protect stores during the disturbances, which has printed on it “hands up,” along with cell phone videos and photos. A purpose of the NMAAHC, Bunch notes, is to place racial conflict and historical events in context, to make people realize that there are “moments of possibility,” where fundamental change and progress can be made. There will certainly be more material for the NMAAHC to collect based on the BLM’s new (as of August 2015) ten-point policy directive, Campaign Zero, directed at state and federal policing authorities.7 Though many may not link the two, the BLM movement is linked to the Constitution, for both have at their core the idea “to form a more perfect union.” This ideal, encompassing issues of life, liberty, and freedom of movement, is as radical and patriotic as the symbolism of what it means to be free in America.

     


     

    This exhibit review originally appeared in volume 6, issue 1 of Transfers: Interdisciplinary Journal of Mobility Studies.


     

    Notes

    1. National Public Radio (NPR), “Black Lives Matter: Coming to a Museum Near You?” 1 August 2015, http://www.npr.org/sections/codeswitch/2015/08/01/428085104/black-lives-matter-coming-to-a-museum-near-you. National Public Radio (accessed 12 September 2015).
    1. “At the Brooklyn Museum, Art Helps Show Why Black Lives Matter,” Aljazeera America, http://america.aljazeera.com/articles/2015/3/2/kehinde-wiley-showat-brooklyn-museum.html (accessed 11 September 2015).
    1. “Why Museums Should be a Safe Space to Discuss Why #BlackLivesMatter,” Smithsonian.com, http://www.smithsonianmag.com/smithsonian-institution/whymuseums-should-be-safe-space-discuss-why-black-lives-matter-180955114/?-no-ist (accessed 12 September 2015).
    1. “Museum Defi nition,” International Council of Museums, http://icom.museum/the-vision/museum-defi nition/ (accessed 12 September 2015).
    1. “Museum Facts,” American Alliance of Museums, http://www.aam-us.org/about-museums/museum-facts (accessed 16 August 2015).NPR, “Black Lives Matter: Coming to a Museum Near You?”
    1. “Solutions Overview,” Solutions: Campaign Zero, http://www.joincampaignzero.org/solutions/#solutionsoverview (accessed 13 September 2015).

  • Berghahn Journals Blog

    Berghahn Books will be attending NECS 2017!

    We are delighted to inform you that we will be attending the NECS conference in Paris, France from the 29th June – 1st July 2017. Please stop by to browse our selection of titles on display at discounted prices, and take away some free journal samples.

    If you are unable to attend, we would like to provide you with a special discount offer. Valid through August 1st, use discount code NECS17 at checkout and receive a 25% discount on all Film Studies titles found on our website.

     

    Our most recent and forthcoming releases can be found in our Film and Media Catalogue while the titles featured below include a selection of those which will be highlighted at the conference.

     


    Edited by Tim Bergfelder, Lisa Shaw and João Luiz Vieira

     

    Despite the recent explosion of scholarly interest in “star studies,” Brazilian film has received comparatively little attention. As this volume demonstrates, however, the richness of Brazilian stardom extends well beyond the ubiquitous Carmen Miranda. Among the studies assembled here are fascinating explorations of figures such as Eliane Lage (the star attraction of São Paulo’s Vera Cruz studios), cult horror movie auteur Coffin Joe, and Lázaro Ramos, the most visible Afro-Brazilian actor today. At the same time, contributors interrogate the inner workings of the star system in Brazil, from the pioneering efforts of silent-era actresses to the recent advent of the non-professional movie star.

    Read Introduction

     

    Economy, Work, Consumption and Social Class in Polish Cinema
    Ewa Mazierska

     

    Like many Eastern European countries, Poland has seen a succession of divergent economic and political regimes over the last century, from prewar “embedded liberalism,” through the state socialism of the Soviet era, to the present neoliberal moment. Its cinema has been inflected by these changing historical circumstances, both mirroring and resisting them. This volume is the first to analyze the entirety of the nation’s film history—from the reemergence of an independent Poland in 1918 to the present day—through the lenses of political economy and social class, showing how Polish cinema documented ordinary life while bearing the hallmarks of specific ideologies.

    Read Introduction

     

    BODIES IN PAIN
    Emotion and the Cinema of Darren Aronofsky
    Tarja Laine

     

    “Laine’s evocative, near-poetic style is refreshing after the former domination of strenuous cognitivist theory in the study of film emotion, and she offers plenty of empirical evidence to back up her claims. Surely such a sensory art form as cinema deserves to be seen (or felt) through an affective lens, and Laine makes an engaging and accessible yet thoroughly rigorous argument for doing so through her study of Aronofsky’s work. Bodies in Pain is recommended for those interested in film phenomenology as well as the intersections of aestheticism, emotion, and philosophy in the cinema.” · Film-Philosophy

    Bodies in Pain looks at how Aronofsky’s films engage the spectator in an affective form of viewing that involves all the senses, ultimately engendering a process of (self) reflection through their emotional dynamics.

    Read Introduction: Aronofsky, Auteurship, Aesthetics

     

    STORIES MAKE THE WORLD
    Reflections on Storytelling and the Art of the Documentary
    Stephen Most

     

    Stories Make the World is an insightful look into the craft of documentary filmmaking that should be required reading for media students. Story and honesty are needed now more than ever in an era of ‘fake news,’ half-truths, and technical virtuosity.” · John de Graaf, Director of Affluenza and fifteen other national PBS documentaries

    Since the beginning of human history, stories have helped people make sense of their lives and their world. Today, an understanding of storytelling is invaluable as we seek to orient ourselves within a flood of raw information and an unprecedented variety of supposedly true accounts. In Stories Make the World, award-winning screenwriter Stephen Most offers a captivating, refreshingly heartfelt exploration of how documentary filmmakers and other storytellers come to understand their subjects and cast light on the world through their art. Drawing on the author’s decades of experience behind the scenes of television and film documentaries, this is an indispensable account of the principles and paradoxes that attend the quest to represent reality truthfully.

    Read Introduction

     

    ORGANIC CINEMA
    Film, Architecture, and the Work of Béla Tarr
    Thorsten Botz-Bornstein

     

    The “organic” is by now a venerable concept within aesthetics, architecture, and art history, but what might such a term mean within the spatialities and temporalities of film? By way of an answer, this concise and innovative study locates organicity in the work of Béla Tarr, the renowned Hungarian filmmaker and pioneer of the “slow cinema” movement. Through a wholly original analysis of the long take and other signature features of Tarr’s work, author Thorsten Botz-Bornstein establishes compelling links between the seemingly remote spheres of film and architecture, revealing shared organic principles that emphasize the transcendence of boundaries.

    Read Introduction

     

    THE BRESSONIANS
    French Cinema and the Culture of Authorship
    Codruţa Morari

     

    How should we understand film authorship in an era when the idea of the solitary and sovereign auteur has come under attack, with critics proclaiming the death of the author and the end of cinema? The Bressonians provides an answer in the form of a strikingly original study of Bresson and his influence on the work of filmmakers Jean Eustache and Maurice Pialat. Extending the discourse of authorship beyond the idea of a singular visionary, it explores how the imperatives of excellence function within cinema’s pluralistic community. Bresson’s example offered both an artistic legacy and a creative burden within which filmmakers reckoned in different, often arduous, and altogether compelling ways.

     

    THE MAN FROM THE THIRD ROW
    Hasse Ekman, Swedish Cinema and the Long Shadow of Ingmar Bergman
    Fredrik Gustafsson

     

    Until his early retirement at age 50, Hasse Ekman was one of the leading lights of Swedish cinema, an actor, writer, and director of prodigious talents. Yet today his work is virtually unknown outside of Sweden, eclipsed by the filmography of his occasional collaborator (and frequent rival) Ingmar Bergman. This comprehensive introduction—the first ever in English—follows Ekman’s career from his early days as a film journalist, through landmark films such as Girl with Hyacinths (1950), to his retirement amid exhaustion and disillusionment. Combining historical context with insightful analyses of Ekman’s styles and themes, this long overdue study considerably enriches our understanding of Swedish film history.

     

    RE-IMAGINING DEFA
    East German Cinema in its National and Transnational Contexts
    Edited by Seán Allan and Sebastian Heiduschke

     

    “Berghahn is known for its publication of excellent books on German Cinema within its catalog. This recent work proves no exception to the rule. Including fifteen essays by well known scholars in the field aware of the changing complexities of subject matter and well versed in necessary archive research, [it] presents a fine collection exploring a cinema that is very little known to most Western viewers…a sterling example of what a scholarly academic anthology should be, an excellent model in its own right that should stimulate others to investigate this former national cinema and not consign it to oblivion.” · Film International

     

    By the time the Berlin Wall collapsed, the cinema of the German Democratic Republic—to the extent it was considered at all—was widely regarded as a footnote to European film history, with little of enduring value. Since then, interest in East German cinema has exploded, inspiring innumerable festivals, books, and exhibits on the GDR’s rich and varied filmic output. In Re-Imagining DEFA, leading international experts take stock of this vibrant landscape and plot an ambitious course for future research, one that considers other cinematic traditions, brings genre and popular works into the fold, and encompasses DEFA’s complex post-unification “afterlife.”

    Read Introduction: Re-Imagining East German Cinema

     

    Edited by Guy Austin

     

    Through his influential work on cultural capital and social mobility, the French sociologist Pierre Bourdieu has provided critical insights into the complex interactions of power, class, and culture in the modern era. Ubiquitous though Bourdieu’s theories are, however, they have only intermittently been used to study some of the most important forms of cultural production today: cinema and new media. With topics ranging from film festivals and photography to constantly evolving mobile technologies, this collection demonstrates the enormous relevance that Bourdieu’s key concepts hold for the field of media studies, deploying them as powerful tools of analysis and forging new avenues of inquiry in the process.

    Read Introduction: Bourdieu on Media and Film

     

    Radicalism and Revolution in Western European Film
    Benjamin Halligan

     

    As with many aspects of European cultural life, film was galvanized and transformed by the revolutionary fervor of 1968. This groundbreaking study provides a full account of the era’s cinematic crises, innovations, and provocations, as well as the social and aesthetic contexts in which they appeared. The author mounts a genuinely fresh analysis of a contested period in which everything from the avant-garde experiments of Godard, Pasolini, Schroeter, and Fassbinder to the “low” cinematic genres of horror, pornography, and the Western reflected the cultural upheaval of youth in revolt—a cinema for the barricades.

    Read Chapter 1. “All All All”

     

    Ecocriticism and the Environmental Sensibility of New Hollywood
    Adam O’Brien

     

    In their bold experimentation and bracing engagement with culture and politics, the “New Hollywood” films of the late 1960s and early 1970s are justly celebrated contributions to American cinematic history. Relatively unexplored, however, has been the profound environmental sensibility that characterized movies such as The Wild Bunch, Chinatown, and Nashville. This brisk and engaging study explores how many hallmarks of New Hollywood filmmaking, such as the increased reliance on location shooting and the rejection of American self-mythologizing, made the era such a vividly “grounded” cinematic moment. Synthesizing a range of narrative, aesthetic, and ecocritical theories, it offers a genuinely fresh perspective on one of the most studied periods in film history.

    Read Introduction


    Film Europa Series
    German Cinema in an International Context

    This is a series which, in a very short period of time, has had a huge impact on the field.”  ·  Monatshefte

    German cinema is normally seen as a distinct form, but this series emphasizes connections, influences, and exchanges of German cinema across national borders, as well as its links with other media and art forms. Individual titles present traditional historical research (archival work, industry studies) as well as new critical approaches in film and media studies (theories of the transnational), with a special emphasis on the continuities associated with popular traditions and local perspectives.

     

    GERMAN TELEVISION
    Historical and Theoretical Perspectives
    Edited by Larson Powell and Robert R. Shandley

     

    Long overlooked by scholars and critics, the history and aesthetics of German television have only recently begun to attract serious, sustained attention, and then largely within Germany. This ambitious volume, the first in English on the subject, provides a much-needed corrective in the form of penetrating essays on the distinctive theories, practices, and social-historical contexts that have defined television in Germany. Encompassing developments from the dawn of the medium through the Cold War and post-reunification, this is an essential introduction to a rich and varied media tradition.

    Read Introduction

     

    IMPERIAL PROJECTIONS
    Screening the German Colonies
    Wolfgang Fuhrmann

     

    “One cannot rank the significance of Fuhrmann’s book as a model of German film historiography highly enough. Not only does Imperial Projection offer the first convincing overall overview of a forgotten and suppressed chapter of German film history; the book makes also clear what a modern, methodologically innovative and empirically supported film historiography is capable of achieving.” · H-Soz-Kult

    This book is the first in-depth analysis of colonial filmmaking in the Wilhelmine Era.

    Read Introduction

     

    2014 PREMIO LIMINA PRIZE FOR BEST FILM STUDIES BOOK (IN A LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ITALIAN)

    THE EMERGENCE OF FILM CULTURE
    Knowledge Production, Institution Building, and the Fate of the Avant-garde in Europe, 1919-1945
    Edited by Malte Hagener

     

    “…the book offers a rich and articulated picture of the organization and building of film culture in interwar Europe, and proves to be very keen in disclosing unexplored corners of well-known national film histories (as the Italian and German ones), but also of little explored scenarios (such as Swedish film culture or the Yugoslavian case).” · Historical Journal of Film, Radio and Television

    By examining the extraordinarily rich and creative uses of cinema in the interwar period, we can examine the roots of film culture as we know it today.

    Read Introduction: The Emergence of Film Culture

    For a full selection of titles in Film Europa please visit series page


    OF RELATED INTEREST FROM BERGHAHN JOURNALS   

     

    The Journal for Movies and Mind

     

    Projections is an interdisciplinary, peer-reviewed journal that explores how the mind experiences, understands, and interprets the audiovisual and narrative structures of cinema and other visual media. Recognizing cinema as an art form, the journal aims to integrate established traditions of analyzing media aesthetics with current research into perception, cognition, and emotion, according to frameworks supplied by psychology, psychoanalysis, and the cognitive and neurosciences.

     

    An Interdisciplinary Journal of Experience, Perception, and Display

     

    Screen Bodies is a peer-reviewed journal focusing on the intersection of Screen Studies and Body Studies across disciplines, institutions, and media. It is a forum promoting research on various aspects of embodiment on and in front of screens through articles, reviews, and interviews. Screen Bodies addresses the portrayal, function, and reception of bodies on and in front of screens from the perspectives of gender and sexuality, feminism and masculinity, trans* studies, queer theory, critical race theory, cyborg studies, and dis/ability studies.

     

  • Berghahn Journals Blog

    Visit Berghahn Books at ECAS 2017!

     

    If you are unable to attend, we would like to provide you with a special discount offer. Valid through August 1st, use discount code ECAS17 at checkout and receive a 25% discount on all African Studies titles found on our website.


    Our most recent and forthcoming releases can be found in our  African Studies Catalogue, while the titles featured include a selection of those which will be highlighted at the conference:

     

    Development, Tourism and the Politics of Benevolence in Mozambique
    João Afonso Baptista

    Volume 30, EASA Series

     

    Drawing on ethnographic research in the village of Canhane, which is host to the first community tourism project in Mozambique, The Good Holiday explores the confluence of two powerful industries: tourism and development, and explains when, how and why tourism becomes development and development, tourism. The volume further explores the social and material consequences of this merging, presenting the confluence of tourism and development as a major vehicle for the exercise of ethics, and non-state governance in contemporary life.

    Read Introduction

     

    Economic Lives Inside a Liberian Refugee Camp
    Naohiko Omata

    Volume 36, Forced Migration

     

    For many refugees, economic survival in refugee camps is extraordinarily difficult. Drawing on both qualitative and quantitative research , this volume challenges the reputation of a ‘self-reliant’ model given to Buduburam refugee camp in Ghana and sheds light on considerable economic inequality between refugee households.By following the same refugee households over several years, The Myth of Self-Reliancealso provides valuable insights into refugees’ experiences of repatriation to Liberia after protracted exile and their responses to the ending of refugee status for remaining refugees in Ghana.

    Read Introduction: Buduburam: An Exemplary Refugee Camp?

     

    Music, Ideology and Economic Collapse, from Paris to Kinshasa
    Joe Trapido

    Volume 19, Dislocations

     

    Based on fieldwork in Kinshasa and Paris, Breaking Rocks examines patronage payments within Congolese popular music, where a love song dedication can cost 6,000 dollars and a simple name check can trade for 500 or 600 dollars. Tracing this system of prestige through networks of musicians and patrons – who include gangsters based in Europe, kleptocratic politicians in Congo, and lawless diamond dealers in northern Angola – this book offers insights into ideologies of power and value in central Africa’s troubled post-colonial political economy, as well as a glimpse into the economic flows that make up the hidden side of the globalization.

    Read Introduction

     

    Uncertainty in North-Eastern Sudan
    Sandra Calkins

     

    Although uncertainty is intertwined with all human activity, plans, and aspirations, it is experienced differently: at times it is obsessed over and at times it is ignored. This ethnography shows how Rashaida in north-eastern Sudan deal with unknowns from day-to-day unpredictability to life-threatening dangers. It argues that the amplification of uncertainty in some cases and its extenuation in others can be better understood by focusing on forms that can either hold the world together or invite doubt. Uncertainty, then, need not be seen solely as a debilitating problem, but also as an opportunity to create other futures.

    Read Introduction: Taming Unknowns in Sudan

     

    Development Paradoxes, Belonging and Participation of the Baka in East Cameroon
    Glory M. Lueong

     

    Development interventions often generate contradictions around questions of who benefits from development and which communities are targeted for intervention. This book examines how the Baka, who live in Eastern Cameroon, assert forms of belonging in order to participate in development interventions, and how community life is shaped and reshaped through these interventions. Often referred to as ‘forest people’, the Baka have witnessed many recent development interventions that include competing and contradictory policies such as ‘civilize’, assimilate and integrate the Baka into ‘full citizenship’, conserve the forest and wildlife resources, and preserve indigenous cultures at the verge of extinction.

    Read Introduction

     

    Thresholds of Identities and Illusions on an African Landscape
    Stuart A. Marks

     

    “Few academic books display such depth as does this one, but then few anthropologists devote over five decades to the same communities and issues. Anthropologist Marks first worked among Zambia’s Valley Bisa people in 1966, returning frequently for further research. The result is a masterwork of description, interpretation, and self-reflection.” · Choice

    The “extensive wilderness” of Zambia’s central Luangwa Valley is the homeland of the Valley Bisa whose cultural practices have enriched this environment for centuries. Beginning with the intrusions of warlords and later British colonials, successive generations have experienced the callousness and challenges of colonialism. Their homeland, a slender corridor surrounded by three national parks and an escarpment, is a microcosm of the political, economic and cultural battlefields surrounding most African protected areas today. The story of the Valley Bisa diverges from the myths that conservationists, administrators, and philanthropists, tell about Africa’s environmental and wildlife crises.

    Read Introduction: On Poaching an Elephant: Calling the Shots and Following the Ricochets

     

    VIOLENT BECOMINGS
    State Formation, Sociality, and Power in Mozambique
    Bjørn Enge Bertelsen

    Volume 4, Ethnography, Theory, Experiment

     

    Violent Becomings conceptualizes the Mozambican state not as the bureaucratically ordered polity of the nation-state, but as a continuously emergent and violently challenged mode of ordering. In doing so, this book addresses the question of why colonial and postcolonial state formation has involved violent articulations with so-called ‘traditional’ forms of sociality. The scope and dynamic nature of such violent becomings is explored through an array of contexts that include colonial regimes of forced labor and pacification, liberation war struggles and civil war, the social engineering of the post-independence state, and the popular appropriation of sovereign violence in riots and lynchings.

    Violent Becomings: State Formation, Sociality, and Power in Mozambique by Bjørn Enge Bertelsen is available open access under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0).

    This edition is supported by the University of Bergen. Full text.

     

    Edited by Jacqueline Knörr and Christoph Kohl

    Volume 12, Integration and Conflict Studies

    For centuries, Africa’s Upper Guinea Coast region has been the site of regional and global interactions, with societies from different parts of the African continent and beyond engaging in economic trade, cultural exchange, and various forms of conflict. This book provides a wide-ranging look at how such encounters have continued into the present day, identifying the disruptions and continuities in religion, language, economics, and various other social phenomena that have resulted. These accounts show a region that, while still grappling with the legacies of colonialism and the slave trade, is both shaped by and an important actor within ever-denser global networks, exhibiting consistent transformation and creative adaptation.

    The Upper Guinea Coast in Global Perspective edited by Jacqueline Knörr and Christoph Kohl is available open access under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0).

    This edition is supported by Knowledge Unlatched. Full Text.

     

    Edited by Axel Fleisch and Rhiannon Stephens

    Volume 25, Making Sense of History

    Employing an innovative methodological toolkit, Doing Conceptual History in Africa provides a refreshingly broad and interdisciplinary approach to African historical studies. The studies assembled here focus on the complex role of language in Africa’s historical development, with a particular emphasis on pragmatics and semantics. From precolonial dynamics of wealth and poverty to the conceptual foundations of nationalist movements, each contribution strikes a balance between the local and the global, engaging with a distinctively African intellectual tradition while analyzing the regional and global contexts in which categories like “work,” “marriage,” and “land” take shape.

    Read Introduction: Theories and Methods of African Conceptual History

     

    THE DECOLONIAL MANDELA
    Peace, Justice and the Politics of Life
    Sabelo Ndlovu-Gatsheni

     

    A significant contribution to the emerging literature on decolonial studies, this concise and forcefully argued volume lays out a groundbreaking interpretation of the “Mandela phenomenon.” Contrary to a neoliberal social model that privileges adversarial criminal justice and a rationalistic approach to war making, Sabelo J. Ndlovu-Gatsheni identifies transformative political justice and a reimagined social order as key features of Nelson Mandela’s legacy. Mandela is understood here as an exemplar of decolonial humanism, one who embodied the idea of survivor’s justice and held up reconciliation and racial harmony as essential for transcending colonial modes of thought.

    Read Introduction: Mandela Phenomenon as Decolonial Humanism

     

    CUTTING AND CONNECTING
    ‘Afrinesian’ Perspectives on Networks, Relationality, and Exchange
    Edited by Knut Christian Myhre

     

    Questions regarding the origins, mobility, and effects of analytical concepts continue to emerge as anthropology endeavors to describe similarities and differences in social life around the world. Cutting and Connecting rethinks this comparative enterprise by calling in a conceptual debt that theoretical innovations from Melanesian anthropology owe to network analysis originally developed in African contexts. On this basis, the contributors adopt and employ concepts from recent studies of Melanesia to analyze contemporary life on the African continent and to explore how this exchange influences the borrowed anthropological perspectives. By focusing on ways in which networks are cut and connections are made, these empirical investigations show how particular relationships are created in today’s Africa. In addition, the volume aims for an approach that recasts relationships between theory and place and concepts and ethnography, in a manner that destabilizes the distinction between fieldwork and writing.

    Read Introduction: Cutting and Connecting: ‘Afrinesian’ Perspectives on Networks, Relationality, and Exchange

     

    CHILDREN OF THE CAMP
    The Lives of Somali Youth Raised in Kakuma Refugee Camp, Kenya
    Catherine-Lune Grayson

     

    Chronic violence has characterized Somalia for over two decades, forcing nearly two million people to flee. A significant number have settled in camps in neighboring countries, where children were born and raised. Based on in-depth fieldwork, this book explores the experience of Somalis who grew up in Kakuma refugee camp, in Kenya, and are now young adults. This original study carefully considers how young people perceive their living environment and how growing up in exile structures their view of the past and their country of origin, and the future and its possibilities.

     

    PEACEFUL SELVES
    Personhood, Nationhood, and the Post-Conflict Moment in Rwanda
    Laura Eramian

     

    This ethnography of personhood in post-genocide Rwanda investigates how residents of a small town grapple with what kinds of persons they ought to become in the wake of violence. Based on fieldwork carried out over the course of a decade, it uncovers how conflicting moral demands emerge from the 1994 genocide, from cultural contradictions around “good” personhood, and from both state and popular visions for the future. What emerges is a profound dissonance in town residents’ selfhood. While they strive to be agents of change who can catalyze a new era of modern Rwandan nationhood, they are also devastated by the genocide and struggle to recover a sense of selfhood and belonging in the absence of kin, friends, and neighbors. In drawing out the contradictions at the heart of self-making and social life in contemporary Rwanda, this book asserts a novel argument about the ordinary lives caught in global post-conflict imperatives to remember and to forget, to mourn and to prosper.

     


    New in Paperback:

     

    Mensah Adinkrah

     

    “By attending to witch hunts in all its facets in Ghanaian society, [the author] offers the most in-depth examination of witchcraft to date… Although the author focuses on Ghana, the work draws attention to the fact that witchcraft-related violence is not unique to the country, but very much a part of global history, past and present. The wide variety of sources it pulls together and the human face it gives to witchcraft related violence are the biggest strengths of Witchcraft, Witches, and Violence. This is a valuable book for both undergraduate and graduate students in anthropology, sociology, cultural studies, and African studies.” · International Journal of African Historical Studies (IJAHS)

     

    Read Introduction: Witchcraft Violence in Comparative Perspective

     

    Malagasy and Swiss Imaginations of One Another
    Eva Keller

    Volume 20, Environmental Anthropology and Ethnobiology

    “This book will make a great addition to undergraduate courses on Anthropology of the Environment and/or Development or Political Ecology. Keller’s highly readable style, in turn, will satisfy both those new to the subject and scholars already familiar with the topics of conservation practice in Madagascar. It could even become an important resource for those conservation experts who are trying – and (as the study shows) failing – to establish connections between distant places and people.” · Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute

    Read Introduction

     

    The Anthropology and History of Medical Research in Africa
    Edited by P. Wenzel Geissler and Catherine Molyneux

     

    “…a series of compelling and well written chapters…Considering the explosion of medical research in Africa in the age of global health, Evidence, ethos and experiment is a valuable and much-needed contribution to the development of multiple contextual frameworks for historical and contemporary medical research in Africa and elsewhere.” · Social Anthropology/Anthropologie sociale

    Read Introduction: Studying trial communities: anthropological and historical inquiries into ethos, politics and economy of medical research in Africa

     

    Identity Politics in the Cameroon Grassfields
    Michaela Pelican

    Volume 11, Integration and Conflict Studies

     

    “…necessary and significant, [this study is] a much-welcomed monograph that builds on and advances the corpus of knowledge about the evolution and dynamics of interethnic relations in the Cameroon Grasslands.” · American Anthropologist

    Confrontational encounters stimulated by economic and political rivalry, as well as socially integrative processes, transformed collective self-understanding in Cameroon in conjunction with recent global discourses on human, minority, and indigenous rights. The book provides a vital contribution to the study of ethnicity, conflict, and social change in the anthropology of Africa.

    Read Introduction

     

    Screening the German Colonies
    Wolfgang Fuhrmann

    Volume 17, Film Europa

     

    “One cannot rank the significance of Fuhrmann’s book as a model of German film historiography highly enough. Not only does Imperial Projection offer the first convincing overall overview of a forgotten and suppressed chapter of German film history; the book makes also clear what a modern, methodologically innovative and empirically supported film historiography is capable of achieving.” · H-Soz-Kult

    Read Introduction

     

    AT HOME IN THE OKAVANGO
    White Batswana Narratives of Emplacement and Belonging
    Catie Gressier
    “At Home in the Okavango is a valuable contribution to our understanding of the politics of belonging, safari tourism, and the meaning of whiteness in Botswana, Africa and beyond. Catie Gressier systematically leads her readers to her conclusion in an innovative synthesis of theoretical frames from political ecology, multispecies ethnography, the anthropology of whiteness, and the anthropology of race through the application and expansion of her concept of ‘experiential autochthony’.” · The Australian Journal of Anthropology

    Read Introduction: Waiting for the Flood

     


    Berghahn Journals

     

    Regions and Cohesion is a needed platform for academics and practitioners alike to disseminate both empirical research and normative analysis of topics related to human and environmental security, social cohesion, and governance.

    Featured Article: Round Table Report – Advancing regional social integration, social protection, and the free movement of people in Southern Africa 

     

     

    The International Journal of Social and Cultural Practice

    Social Analysis has long been at the forefront of anthropology’s engagement with the humanities and other social sciences. In forming a critical, concerned, and empirical perspective, it encourages contributions that break away from the disciplinary bounds of anthropology and suggest innovative ways of challenging hegemonic paradigms through “grounded theory,” analysis based in original empirical research.

    Featured Issue: Cutting and Connecting-‘Afrinesian’ Perspectives on Networks, Relationality, and Exchange

     

    A Journal of Social and Political Theory

    Theoria: A Journal of Social and Political Theory is an engaged, multidisciplinary, and peer-reviewed journal of social and political theory. Its purpose is to address, through scholarly debate, the many challenges posed to intellectual life by the major social, political and economic forces that shape the contemporary world.

    Featured Issue: Egalitarian Liberalism – What Are Its Possible Futures in South Africa?

     

    Interdisciplinary Journal of Mobility Studies

    Transfers: Interdisciplinary Journal of Mobility Studies is a peer-reviewed journal publishing cutting-edge research on the processes, structures, and consequences of the movement of people, resources, and commodities. Intellectually rigorous, broadly ranging, and conceptually innovative, the journal combines the empiricism of traditional mobility history with more recent methodological approaches from the social sciences and the humanities.

    Special Issue on African Mobilities

     

     

  • Berghahn Journals Blog

    World Refugee Day 2017

     

    In marking this year’s observance, Berghahn is pleased to feature a selection of books of related interest and offer a 25% discount on all Refugee and Migration Studies titles. For the next 30 days use discount code REF17 at checkout.

     


    Cambodians in the United States
    Carol A. Mortland

     

    Grace after Genocide is the first comprehensive ethnography of Cambodian refugees, charting their struggle to transition from life in agrarian Cambodia to survival in post-industrial America, while maintaining their identities as Cambodians. The ethnography contrasts the lives of refugees who arrived in America after 1975, with their focus on Khmer traditions, values, and relations, with those of their children who, as descendants of the Khmer Rouge catastrophe, have struggled to become Americans in a society that defines them as different. The ethnography explores America’s mid-twentieth century involvement in Southeast Asia and its enormous consequences on multiple generations of Khmer refugees.

    Read Introduction: From Cambodians to Refugees

     

    CHILDREN OF THE CAMP
    The Lives of Somali Youth Raised in Kakuma Refugee Camp, Kenya
    Catherine-Lune Grayson

     

    Chronic violence has characterized Somalia for over two decades, forcing nearly two million people to flee. A significant number have settled in camps in neighboring countries, where children were born and raised. Based on in-depth fieldwork, this book explores the experience of Somalis who grew up in Kakuma refugee camp, in Kenya, and are now young adults. This original study carefully considers how young people perceive their living environment and how growing up in exile structures their view of the past and their country of origin, and the future and its possibilities.

     

    Germany from 1945 to the Present
    Edited by Cornelia Wilhelm
    Preface by Konrad Jarausch

    Volume 21, Contemporary European History

     

    Within Germany, policies and cultural attitudes toward migrants have been profoundly shaped by the difficult legacies of the Second World War and its aftermath. This wide-ranging volume explores the complex history of migration and diversity in Germany from 1945 to today, showing how conceptions of “otherness” developed while memories of the Nazi era were still fresh, and identifying the continuities and transformations they exhibited through the Cold War and reunification. It provides invaluable context for understanding contemporary Germany’s unique role within regional politics at a time when an unprecedented influx of immigrants and refugees present the European community with a significant challenge.

    Read Introduction

     

    Edited by Jason Coy, Jared Poley, and Alexander Schunka

    Volume 13, Spektrum: Publications of the German Studies Association

     

    Migration to, from, and within German-speaking lands has been a dynamic force in Central European history for centuries. Exemplifying some of the most exciting recent research on historical mobility, the essays collected here reconstruct the experiences of vagrants, laborers, religious exiles, refugees, and other migrants during the last five hundred years of German history. With diverse contributions ranging from early modern martyrdom to post–Cold War commemoration efforts, this volume identifies revealing commonalities shared by different eras while also placing the German case within the broader contexts of European and global migration.

    Read Introduction: Migration in the German Lands: An Introduction

     

    SHORTLISTED FOR THE 2017 THINKING ALLOWED AWARD FOR ETHNOGRAPHY

    ENDURING UNCERTAINTY
    Deportation, Punishment and Everyday Life
    Ines Hasselberg

    Volume 17, Dislocations

    This title is available Open Access under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License and published in partnership with Knowledge Unlatched.

     

    “Overall, this is a very accessible book for those who have little experience or knowledge of the UK detention and immigration system. Rich ethnographic material is interwoven effectively with relevant theory, while the findings are both timely and in need of application.” · The Howard Journal of Crime and Justice

    Focusing on the lived experience of immigration policy and processes, this volume provides fascinating insights into the deportation process as it is felt and understood by those subjected to it. The author presents a rich and innovative ethnography of deportation and deportability experienced by migrants convicted of criminal offenses in England and Wales. The unique perspectives developed here – on due process in immigration appeals, migrant surveillance and control, social relations and sense of self, and compliance and resistance – are important for broader understandings of border control policy and human rights.

     

    Resource Politics, Migration, and Climate Change
    Edited by Robert Orttung

    Volume 2, Studies in the Circumpolar North

     

    Urban areas in Arctic Russia are experiencing unprecedented social and ecological change. This collection outlines the key challenges that city managers will face in navigating this shifting political, economic, social, and environmental terrain. In particular, the volume examines how energy production drives a boom-bust cycle in the Arctic economy, explores how migrants from Muslim cultures are reshaping the social fabric of northern cities, and provides a detailed analysis of climate change and its impact on urban and industrial infrastructure.

    Read Chapter 1. Russia’s Arctic Cities: Recent Evolution and Drivers of Change

     

    Relations, Return and Belonging
    Edited by Nataša Gregorič Bon and Jaka Repič

    Volume 29, EASA Series

     

    Moving Places draws together contributions from Europe, Latin America, Asia, and Africa, exploring practices and experiences of movement, non-movement, and place-making. The book centers on “moving places”: places with locations that are not fixed but relative. Locations appearing to be reasonably stable, such as home and homeland, are in fact always subject to practices, imaginaries, and politics of movement. Bringing together original ethnographic contributions with a clear theoretical focus, this volume spans the fields of anthropology, human geography, migration, and border studies, and serves as teaching material in related programs.

    Read Introduction

     

    STAYING AT HOME
    Identities, Memories and Social Networks of Kazakhstani Germans
    Rita Sanders

    Volume 13, Integration and Conflict Studies

     

    Despite economic growth in Kazakhstan, more than 80 per cent of Kazakhstan’s ethnic Germans have emigrated to Germany to date. Disappointing experiences of the migrants, along with other aspects of life in Germany, have been transmitted through transnational networks to ethnic Germans still living in Kazakhstan. Consequently, Germans in Kazakhstan today feel more alienated than ever from their ‘historic homeland’. This book explores the interplay of those memories, social networks and state policies, which play a role in the ‘construction’ of a Kazakhstani German identity.


    Forced Migration Series

    Published in association with the Refugees Studies Centre, University of Oxford

    This series, published in association with the Refugees Studies Centre, University of Oxford, reflects the multidisciplinary nature of the field and includes within its scope international law, anthropology, sociology, politics, international relations, geopolitics, social psychology and economics.

     

    THE MYTH OF SELF-RELIANCE
    Economic Lives Inside a Liberian Refugee Camp
    Naohiko Omata

     

    For many refugees, economic survival in refugee camps is extraordinarily difficult. Drawing on both qualitative and quantitative research , this volume challenges the reputation of a ‘self-reliant’ model given to Buduburam refugee camp in Ghana and sheds light on considerable economic inequality between refugee households.By following the same refugee households over several years, The Myth of Self-Reliancealso provides valuable insights into refugees’ experiences of repatriation to Liberia after protracted exile and their responses to the ending of refugee status for remaining refugees in Ghana.

    Introduction: Buduburam: An Exemplary Refugee Camp?

     

    MIGRATION BY BOAT
    Discourses of Trauma, Exclusion and Survival
    Edited by Lynda Mannik

     

    At a time when thousands of refugees risk their lives undertaking perilous journeys by boat across the Mediterranean, this multidisciplinary volume could not be more pertinent. It offers various contemporary case studies of boat migrations undertaken by asylum seekers and refugees around the globe and shows that boats not only move people and cultural capital between places, but also fuel cultural fantasies, dreams of adventure and hope, along with fears of invasion and terrorism. The ambiguous nature of memories, media representations and popular culture productions are highlighted throughout in order to address negative stereotypes and conversely, humanize the individuals involved.

    Read Introduction

     

    FINALIST FOR THE AFRICAN STUDIES ASSOCIATION 2016 BETHWELL A. OGOT BOOK PRIZE

    MAKING UBUMWE
    Power, State and Camps in Rwanda’s Unity-Building Project
    Andrea Purdeková

     

    Since the end of the Rwandan genocide, the new political elite has been challenged with building a unified nation. Reaching beyond the better-studied topics of post-conflict justice and memory, the book investigates the project of civic education, the upsurge of state-led neo-traditional institutions and activities, and the use of camps and retreats shape the “ideal” Rwandan citizen. Rwanda’s ingando camps offer unique insights into the uses of dislocation and liminality in an attempt to anchor identities and desired political roles, to practically orient and symbolically place individuals in the new Rwandan order, and, ultimately, to create additional platforms for the reproduction of political power itself.

    Read PART I: INTRODUCTION


    New in Paperback

     

    CAPRICIOUS BORDERS
    Minority, Population, and Counter-Conduct Between Greece and Turkey
    Olga Demetriou

     

    “Olga Demetriou offers a fascinating examination of borders and border politics in Western Thrace, a politically significant and historically complex border region in Northern Greece… Through beautifully written ethnographic passages and careful analysis, Demetriou offers a sophisticated examination of how difference is experienced, made, managed, and deployed in everyday moments by communities and individuals, with and against state minoritization practices and strategies… [It] is immensely interesting and insightful.” · PoLAR: Political and Legal Anthropology Review

    This study explores the mechanisms employed at the interstices of two opposing views on the presence of minority populations in western Thrace: the legalization of their status as établis (established) and the failure to incorporate the minority in the Greek national imaginary. Revealing the logic of government bureaucracy shows how they replicate difference from the inter-state level to the communal and the personal.

     

    Immigrant Transnational Organizations in Four Continents
    Edited by Alejandro Portes and Patricia Fernández-Kelly

     

    “…an insightful volume that makes a significant contribution to the scholarly field on transnationalism with a particular reference to the migration-development-integration nexus. I would recommend this volume to anyone interested in organisational transnationalism, homeland development and integration.” · Nordic Journal of Migration Research

    Whereas most of the literature on migration focuses on individuals and their families, this book studies the organizations created by immigrants to protect themselves in their receiving states. Comparing eighteen of these grassroots organizations formed across the world, from India to Colombia to Vietnam to the Congo, researchers from the United States, Belgium, France, the Netherlands, and Spain focus their studies on the internal structure and activities of these organizations as they relate to developmental initiatives. The book outlines the principal positions in the migration and development debate and discusses the concept of transnationalism as a means of resolving these controversies.

    Read Introduction: Immigration, Transnationalism, and Development: The State of the Question


    Berghahn Journals: 

     

    Advances in Research

    Publishing peer-reviewed articles by international scholars, Conflict and Society expands the field of conflict studies by using ethnographic inquiry to establish new fields of research and interdisciplinary collaboration. An opening special section presents general articles devoted to a topic or region followed by a section featuring conceptual debates on key problems in the study of organized violence.

    Featured Article:
    Managing Danger in Fieldwork with Perpetrators of Political Violence and State Terror
    Jeffrey A. Sluka

     

    Focaal
    Journal of Global and Historical Anthropology

    Focaal is a peer-reviewed journal advocating an approach that rests in the simultaneity of ethnography, processual analysis, local insights, and global vision. It is at the heart of debates on the ongoing conjunction of anthropology and history as well as the incorporation of local research settings in the wider spatial networks of coercion, imagination, and exchange that are often glossed as “globalization” or “empire.”

    Featured Article:
    From individual grief to a shared history of the Bosnian war: Voice, audience, and the political in psychotherapeutic practices with refugees
    Laura Huttunen

    Focaalblog
    FocaalBlog is associated with Focaal: Journal of Global and Historical Anthropology. It aims to accelerate and intensify anthropological conversations beyond what a regular academic journal can do, and to make them more widely, globally, and swiftly available. Follow us on Twitter!

     

    Regions and Cohesion

    Regions and Cohesion is a needed platform for academics and practitioners alike to disseminate both empirical research and normative analysis of topics related to human and environmental security, social cohesion, and governance. It covers themes, such as the management of strategic resources, environment and society, social risk and marginalization, disasters and policy responses, violence, war and urban security, the quality of democracy, development, public health, immigration, human rights, organized crime, and cross-border human security.

    Featured Article:
    Migración, inseguridad y vulnerabilidad en el corredor del Golfo de México
    Rosío Córdova and Hipólito Rodríguez

     
     
    COMING SOON!
     

    Migration and Society

    Migration and Society is an interdisciplinary peer-reviewed journal advancing debate about emergent trends in all types of migration. We invite work that situates migration in a wider historical and societal context, including attention to experiences and representations of migration, critical theoretical perspectives on migration, and the social, cultural, and legal embeddedness of migration. Global in its scope, we particularly encourage scholarship from and about the global South as well as the North.
     
     
     

Top Article Downloads


  1. Under the Shadow of Empire: Indigenous Girls' Presencing as Decolonizing Force
    Girlhood Studies, vol. 7, #1, Summer 2014
  2. Forget Dawkins: Notes toward an Ethnography of Religious Belief and Doubt
    Social Analysis, vol. 59, #2, Summer 2015
  3. Blaming Sexualization for Sexting
    Girlhood Studies, vol. 7, #1, Summer 2014
  4. Out of the Closet? German Patriotism and Soccer Mania
    German Politics & Society, vol.24, #3, Autumn 2006
  5. Rape Culture and the Feminist Politics of Social Media
    Girlhood Studies, vol. 7, #1, Summer 2014
  6. Less Than One But More Than Many: Anthropocene as Science Fiction and Scholarship-in-the-Making
    Environment and Society, vol. 6, #1, Summer 2015
  7. Staging "small, small incidents": Dissent, gender, and militarization among young people in Kashmir
    Focaal, vol. 2011, #60, Summer 2011
  8. An Inquiry into the Roots of the Modern Concept of Development
    Contributions to the History of Concepts, vol. 4, #2, Autumn 2008
  9. Misunderstood, misrepresented, contested? Anthropological knowledge production in question
    Focaal, vol. 2015, #72, Summer 2015
  10. Theatres of virtue: Collaboration, consensus, and the social life of corporate social responsibility
    Focaal, vol. 2011, #60, Summer 2011

Berghahn Collections

Libraries may purchase at a special discount (with the option to purchase the backfiles in addition) the entire Berghahn collection or Berghahn journals bundled by subjects.

Berghahn Journals New Online Platform

Berghahn Journals is pleased to announce the launch of our new journals online platform starting April 1. We will be working with all subscribers to make the transition process as seamless as possible and will contact you in the coming weeks with more information about access procedures.

March 31 is the last day Berghahn will be hosting its journal content on IngentaConnect. Starting April 1, all Berghahn journal content will be hosted by PubFactory on the new Berghahn Online platform.

Berghahn Online will offer a high-performing platform with the following innovative features and services in addition to those already offered to Institutional Users

Admin Users

  • Seamless content authorization based on institutional IP address
  • Marc Records support that allows for easy download on a per subscription basis
  • More purchase options for custom journal collections
  • Customization to include institutional branding, including library name, logo and URL
  • Continuous access to up-to-date COUNTER reports and SUSHI support

End-Users

  • Mobile optimized responsive site design
  • Increased content discoverability through OAI-PMH support
  • Improved search results
  • User-defined personalization including saved searches, bookmarking, and annotation

Please find more information, including FAQ, here

Journals Catalogs



Recent Blog Articles

Berghahn Books will be attending NECS 2017!

We are delighted to inform you that we will be attending the NECS conference in Paris, France from the 29th June – 1st July 2017. Please stop by to browse our selection of titles on display at discounted prices, and take away some free journal samples. If you are unable to attend, we would like to provide […]

Visit Berghahn Books at ECAS 2017!

We are delighted to inform you that we will be attending the 7th European Conference on African Studies in Basel, Switzerland from the 29th June – 1st July 2017. Please stop by to browse our selection of titles on display, and take away some free journal samples.   If you are unable to attend, we […]

World Refugee Day 2017

The United Nations’ (UN) World Refugee Day is observed on June 20 each year. This event draws public’s attention to the millions of refugees and internally displaced persons worldwide who have been forced to flee their homes due to war, conflict and persecution. For more information please visit www.un.org.   In marking this year’s observance, […]

European Judaism at 50

This issue marks the beginning of the fifty-first year of publication of the journal, something to be registered with a degree of pride and not a little wonder. We have been served over this time with a remarkable series of editors, beginning with our founding editor Rabbi Dr Ignaz Maybaum z’l (1897-1976). In those early […]

Berghahn Journals: New Issues Published in May

Boyhood Studies An Interdisciplinary Journal Volume 10, Issue 1 With the theme of “Male Youth Sports: Changing Contexts and Emergent Perspectives,” this special issue presents contributions about boys in global sports contexts from fields as diverse as the history of sport, sport sociology, and sport psychology.