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Berghahn Journals is the journals division of Berghahn Books, an independent scholarly publisher in the humanities and social sciences. A peer-review press, Berghahn is committed to the highest academic standards and seeks to enable innovative contributions to the scholarship in its fields of specialty.

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  • EnviroSociety

    New Featured Article!: “Explorations in Ethnoelephantology”

    The latest Environment and Society featured article is now available! This month’s article—”Explorations in Ethnoelephantology: Social, Historical, and Ecological Intersections between Asian Elephants and Humans”—comes from Volume 4 (2013). In his article, Piers Locke charts the emergence of an interdisciplinary research program and discursive space for human-elephant intersections under the rubric of ethnoelephantology

    Visit the featured article page to download your copy of the article today before it’s gone! A new article is featured every month.

    The Asian or Asiatic elephant is the only living species of the genus Elephas and is distributed in Southeast Asia from India in the west to Borneo in the east (photograph by Dennis Jarvis via Flickr, CC BY-SA 2.0).



    PIERS LOCKE is a social anthropologist at the University of Canterbury, New Zealand. Piers conducts field research in Chitwan, Nepal, where his primary interest is human-elephant relations. He has curated two exhibitions based on his field photography and coproduced the ethnographic film Servants of Ganesh (2010)Piers recently convened an interdisciplinary symposium on human-elephant relations in South and Southeast Asia, and his latest research concerns the historical photography of humans and elephants in colonial South Asia. He is also writing a monograph about his research with Nepali handlers and their elephants.

  • FocaalBlog

    Joe Trapido: Breaking Rocks: Music, Ideology and Economic Collapse, from Paris to Kinshasa

    Breaking Rocks is a volume of the Dislocations series published by Berghahn Books, a series closely associated with Focaal and FocaalBlog. The immense dislocations and suffering caused by neoliberal globalization the retreat of the welfare state in the last decades of the twentieth century, and the heightened military imperialism at the turn of the twenty-first century have raised urgent questions about the temporal and spatial dimensions of power. Through stimulating critical perspectives and new and cross-disciplinary frameworks, which reflect recent innovations in the social and human sciences, this series provides a forum for politically engaged, ethnographically informed, and theoretically incisive responses.

    For more than 50 years, the music of Kinshasa, capital of the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), was the most popular in Africa. A form of artistic expression that is strongly tied to the growth of the modern city, it was cosmopolitan in its influences and based on Cuban Son, a style enjoying global popularity in the 1930s and ’40s. The lyrics of Congolese music are generally about love, with the convention from early on being that an artist sings in the first person, making the song’s narrative of passion about a real named individual. Songs were written to please powerful patrons, make a gift to friends, or even to settle an unpaid bill in a furniture shop. Thus, while the music is about love, its context has always been deeply political and economic.

    In the 1950s and 1960s, musicians became closely associated with, and sung for, various political factions in Congo, from Lumumba’s “radicals”—aligned with nationalists in other parts of Africa like Nkrumah—to the “moderates,” from Kasavubu to Mobutu and Tshombe, who made common cause with the CIA, Belgium, and white supremacists. Later, when Mobutu’s CIA-backed regime was the only game in town, musicians lent aesthetic credibility to Authenticité, Mobutu’s rather ersatz back-to-our-roots project of cultural nationalism.

    While my book pays attention to this history, my own research concentrates on the period from the late 1970s until the present. Over this time, Congolese music retained its central political and economic importance, but it also became ever more deeply implicated in a migrant economy that connected European capitals like Paris, London, and Brussels, lawless diamond mining enclaves like Kafunfo in Angola, at the epicentre of Angola’s civil war, and the Congolese capital Kinshasa.

    TrapidoBreaking

    ***

    It is 2001, and I am at a concert at the Brixton Academy performed by the Congolese pop star Koffi Olomide. The concert is, as ever, extremely late in starting. The audience is extraordinary; gold leaf biker jackets, beautifully tailored suits in four colors with Andy Warhol screenprints, fur coats, knee-high crocodile skin boots, kilts. Later, one after another of these well-dressed men—there are few women in the audience—come on stage and press bank notes onto the sweating forehead of Koffi, the lead singer. This is not small change. Most of the notes are fifties, and each patron slaps down at least four or five notes, some patrons handing over more than a thousand pounds. As I would later learn, such prestations, called mabanga, are part of a wider system—the focus of my book—in which music, reputation, and control of social reproduction are negotiated in an economy of prestige that links Europe and Kinshasa.

    Toward the end of the 1970s, the Zaïrian state began a downward slide from which it would not recover. A collapse in commodity prices, inflation, structural adjustment, and predation by the elite destroyed the formal sectors of the economy. The society began to reorganize into a set of political arrangements that, though they remained authoritarian and violent, were based on much more personalized and informal kinds of clientelism.

    These violent social changes also relate to the title of my book, Breaking Rocks, a phrase that has recurred in the region throughout the precolonial, colonial, and postcolonial worlds. I believe that the various usages of the phrase—meaning, initially, violent chief; then leviathan colonial state; then, as a verb, in its current meaning as the act of aggressively wresting a living from a hostile world—it illustrates some of the implications of these shifting political economies and how they are experienced by people, and exhibited in action and in cultural production. Be this as it may, as living standards collapsed in Zaire and hard currency income became crucial, a tide of migration quickened.

    Europe has long had an economic importance for the Congolese that is also quasi-mystical. In a song he wrote in 1969, “Mokolo Nakokufa” (The day I die; Ley [1970] 1997), the singer Tabu Ley imagines various members of society at the moment of death. While the prostitute thinks of her wig and the drunkard of his glass of beer, the rich man thinks of the children he has sent to Europe. Wyatt MacGaffey (1986) suggests that in the late nineteenth century, Bakongo peoples thought Europeans were Kaolin-covered ancestors, returned from the land of the dead, while in contemporary “confessions” of witchcraft, children have recounted traveling to Europe in airplanes made from the bones of their sacrificial victims (De Boeck and Plissart 2004).

    From the 1980s, the parisien, the mikiliste, and the sapeur became conspicuous figures in the urban culture of Kinshasa. For the young, designer clothes, strongly associated with a pilgrimage to Europe, became a mark of access to the metropole and a source of prestige that circulated as a quasi-currency. Returning, these pilgrims made prestations of clothes to musicians in exchange for their names being mentioned on records. This patronage, or mabanga, created a cast of celebrities based in Europe who “performed” at concerts, with recorded music telling those back in Kinshasa of the good life they were leading, while prestations made by members of this cast became the stuff of legend. Before the decade was out, cash had become a more common form of payment for a mention on a record, with a set of roughly established prices. New production techniques allowed more names to be included or added and, throughout the 1990s, younger sections of the political elite, migrants to London, and diamond dealers operating out of Angola or the interior all began to “buy in” to this system of prestige, until records became a kind of strange social almanac.

    Breaking Rocks takes an interesting “social fact,” mabanga, and looks at it in empirical detail, explaining for the uninitiated what is going on. But it goes beyond this to look at power and exploitation and, as such, makes a contribution to Marxist anthropology and to cultural Marxism. One aspect of this concerns the relation between music and the “mode of production.” Industrial mining enclaves have underwritten power in much of postcolonial Africa, but they had collapsed in the DRC in the 1980s and 1990s, to be replaced with mining zones familiar to the Bronze Age. In this circumstance, ruling classes did not depend on increases in productive power to enforce their social dominance, and accumulation via the banking system only existed “offshore.” Ideas of social dominance as “gatekeeping” came to the fore—in the violent, parcelized sovereignties that made up the DRC of the period, surpluses were extracted not at the point of production but at nodes in the trade network.

    Control of these “gates” rested in a series of powerful individuals who relied on a skillful interplay between the world of “offshore”—houses in Belgium and accounts in the Virgin Islands—but also on earlier notions of honor and splendor, where the value of the powerful person (but also the wider class he represented) was established in music-saturated ritual. Drawing on, but also critiquing, Marx’s theory of the fetishism of commodities, my work suggests that in the DRC, a form of economic ideology I term “charismatic fetishism” became crucial. This ideological trope—created via musical and theatrical rituals—casts not goods but the persons of the powerful gatekeeper as generative of value, divorced from the wider relations of production and exploitation.


    Joseph Trapido earned a PhD in social anthropology at the University College London. He was a British Academy postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Anthropology and Sociology at the School of Oriental and African Studies in London, where he now works as a lecturer. His research is about the Democratic Republic of Congo.


    References

    De Boeck Filip, and Marie-Françoise Plissart. 2004. Kinshasa: Tales of the invisible city. Ghent,: Ludion.

    MacGaffey, Wyatt. 1986. Religion and society in central Africa: The BaKongo of lower Zaire. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

    Ley, Tabu. (1970) 1997. Mokolo nakokufa. Le Seigneur Rochereau a L’Olympia.


    Cite as: Trapido, Joe. 2017. “Breaking Rocks: Music, Ideology and Economic Collapse, from Paris to Kinshasa. FocaalBlog, 5 September. www.focaalblog.com/2017/09/05/joe-trapido-breaking-rocks-music-ideology-and-economic-collapse-from-paris-to-kinshasa.

  • Museum Worlds

    The Black Lives Matter Movement in the National Museum of African American History and Culture

    by Rod Clare, Elon University

    museum-african-american

    It has been over forty years since the mostly successful conclusion of the Civil Rights movement in the United States. While some may have thought the election of an African-American president in 2008 heralded a “postracial” America, continued violence and oppression has brought about a rebirth of activism, embodied by the Black Lives Matter (BLM) movement. Now that nascent movement is preparing to be part of the National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC). The NMAAHC is located at 1400 Constitution Avenue NW, in Washington DC.

    The museum’s overriding goals are to make people aware of African-American history and to foster understanding and reconciliation about race in America and the world. The fact that the BLM movement is so new gives rise to concerns that the museum is collecting material that is too recent, topical, and potentially controversial. Nevertheless, as the director of the NMAAHC, Lonnie Bunch, has made clear, collecting and promoting such material helps “people to realize … that these are not isolated moments. They are part of a long history—a long history of tragedy, but also a long history of resilience and protest.”1

    Though seemingly radical, Bunch’s approach is not without precedent when it comes to museums representing African-American lives (and deaths). A recent example of this is Kehinde Wiley’s exhibit, Kehinde Wiley: A New Republic, presented from February to May 2015, at the Brooklyn Museum in New York. Superimposing modern blacks onto classical Western art reliefs, Wiley’s work made one patron comment that “the fact that they have an exhibit like this maybe could revitalize that conversation again about Black Lives Matter.”2

    A symposium on “History, Rebellion, and Reconciliation,” held at the Smithsonian in April 2015, discussed in part the fatal shooting of an African-American youth in Ferguson, Missouri, in the previous year. A reoccurring theme at the symposium was that museums could offer neutral “‘safe,’ or even ‘sacred’ spaces, within which visitors could wrestle with difficult and complex topics.”3 Currently, there is no better example of a more controversial and nuanced topic in America than the Black Lives Matter movement.

    The BLM movement, born in 2013, was indirectly created out of decades of frustration within the African-American community over the legal system’s continual exoneration of those who had taken black lives. Often, those killed had transgressed supposed spatial boundaries, an issue in the past (for example, when a black youth “strayed” into a white section of a public beach, and responses by whites instigated the Chicago riots of 1919 that took thirty-eight lives), as much as the present. BLM’s direct genesis came as a result of the not-guilty verdict against George Zimmerman, who stalked and killed Trayvon Martin, a seventeen-year-old black youth who Zimmerman thought was in the wrong part of town in Sanford, Florida. Three black women (Patrisse Cullors, Alicia Garza, and Opal Tometi), all activists in the African-American community, viewed the verdict with shock, anger, and an underlying belief that something had to be done. Due to their drive and to further instances of black lives being taken, with ensuing rebellions in cities like Ferguson, Missouri, and Baltimore, Maryland, the movement has quickly taken off. Currently the BLM movement has approximately two dozen chapters throughout the United States as well as chapters in Ghana and Canada.

    Implicit in the rise of BLM and its attendant demands and concerns is the long-standing issue of black mobility. That is, where can black people go and when can they go there? This question is not only relevant for African Americans currently but also in their arduous history in America. The idea of black mobility has been a fundamental query since African Americans were brought to America as enslaved people. As such, their movements and associations were always strictly monitored and in many cases, prohibited by laws, slave patrols, and other means. After the end of slavery, this remained the case in the South and indeed in other parts of the country well into the twentieth century through the implementation of Black Codes, Ku Klux Klan terrorism, sharecropping contracts, city zoning laws, segregation, and various other means.

    In fact, it can be said that blacks gained any semblance of true mobility in the country only in the early 1970s when the last host of Civil Rights laws became implemented and enforced. Two generations later, it is fitting that some have described the BLM protests as the new Civil Rights movement. In a sense, BLM seeks to answer the question of whether or not some fifty years later black lives are truly valued as equal to all others in the country. From the U.S. government’s COINTELPRO assassination and disruption programs against black activists in the late 1960s and 1970s to the “stop and frisk” police sweeps since the 1990s and incidents such as the arrest of Sandra Bland in 2015, the curtailment of black movement makes the answer decidedly mixed.

    The relevancy and emotions concerning the lasting effects of what has been labeled America’s “original sin” makes it a timely yet somewhat uncomfortable issue for a museum to embrace. This then begs the question, “what exactly is the purpose of a museum?” The International Council of Museums (ICOM) defines it as “a non-profit, permanent institution in the service of society and its development, open to the public, which acquires, conserves, researches, communicates and exhibits the tangible and intangible heritage of humanity and its environment for the purposes of education, study and enjoyment.”4 Most people would tend to define a museum as a place where old, if not ancient, objects are put on display to be reviewed in a genteel fashion. This might make it seem that only the elite patronize museums but nothing could be further from the truth. According to the American Alliance of Museums, some 850 million visits occur each year in American museums, more than all major organized sports put together.5

    What Lonnie Bunch, NMAAHC’s director, wants to do is bring a current and controversial topic to the most respected of American museums, the Smithsonian. As Bunch put it in an interview with National Public Radio,

    One of the jobs of a museum is to not only look back, but to look forward. And so once I heard about [the demonstrations] I knew it was very important to make sure that we collected material that might help a curator 20 years from now or 50 years from now look back and tell the story of the changing notions of race in America.6

    Some of the items Bunch prioritizes for collection include banners, posters, gas masks, and a 4’ by 7’ panel of wood used to protect stores during the disturbances, which has printed on it “hands up,” along with cell phone videos and photos. A purpose of the NMAAHC, Bunch notes, is to place racial conflict and historical events in context, to make people realize that there are “moments of possibility,” where fundamental change and progress can be made. There will certainly be more material for the NMAAHC to collect based on the BLM’s new (as of August 2015) ten-point policy directive, Campaign Zero, directed at state and federal policing authorities.7 Though many may not link the two, the BLM movement is linked to the Constitution, for both have at their core the idea “to form a more perfect union.” This ideal, encompassing issues of life, liberty, and freedom of movement, is as radical and patriotic as the symbolism of what it means to be free in America.

     


     

    This exhibit review originally appeared in volume 6, issue 1 of Transfers: Interdisciplinary Journal of Mobility Studies.


     

    Notes

    1. National Public Radio (NPR), “Black Lives Matter: Coming to a Museum Near You?” 1 August 2015, http://www.npr.org/sections/codeswitch/2015/08/01/428085104/black-lives-matter-coming-to-a-museum-near-you. National Public Radio (accessed 12 September 2015).
    1. “At the Brooklyn Museum, Art Helps Show Why Black Lives Matter,” Aljazeera America, http://america.aljazeera.com/articles/2015/3/2/kehinde-wiley-showat-brooklyn-museum.html (accessed 11 September 2015).
    1. “Why Museums Should be a Safe Space to Discuss Why #BlackLivesMatter,” Smithsonian.com, http://www.smithsonianmag.com/smithsonian-institution/whymuseums-should-be-safe-space-discuss-why-black-lives-matter-180955114/?-no-ist (accessed 12 September 2015).
    1. “Museum Defi nition,” International Council of Museums, http://icom.museum/the-vision/museum-defi nition/ (accessed 12 September 2015).
    1. “Museum Facts,” American Alliance of Museums, http://www.aam-us.org/about-museums/museum-facts (accessed 16 August 2015).NPR, “Black Lives Matter: Coming to a Museum Near You?”
    1. “Solutions Overview,” Solutions: Campaign Zero, http://www.joincampaignzero.org/solutions/#solutionsoverview (accessed 13 September 2015).

  • Berghahn Journals Blog

    Visit Berghahn Books at The Royal Geographical Society Annual Conference

    If you are unable to attend, we would like to provide you with a special discount offer. For the next 30 days, receive a 25% discount on all Geography Titles found on our website. At checkout, simply enter the discount code RGS17.

    Visit our website for a complete listing of all published and forthcoming titles.


     

    Below is a preview of some of our newest releases on display:

     

    A Conceptual History
    Edited by Diana Mishkova and Balázs Trencsényi

    Volume 3, European Conceptual History

     

    It is difficult to speak about Europe today without reference to its constitutive regions—supra-national geographical designations such as “Scandinavia,” “Eastern Europe,” and “the Balkans.” Such formulations are so ubiquitous that they are frequently treated as empirical realities rather than a series of shifting, overlapping, and historically constructed concepts. This volume is the first to provide a synthetic account of these concepts and the historical and intellectual contexts in which they emerged. Bringing together prominent international scholars from across multiple disciplines, it systematically and comprehensively explores how such “meso-regions” have been conceptualized throughout modern European history.

    Read Introduction

     

    New in Paperback

    WATERWORLDS
    Anthropology in Fluid Environments
    Edited by Kirsten Hastrup and Frida Hastrup

    Volume 3, Ethnography, Theory, Experiment

     

    In one form or another, water participates in the making and unmaking of people’s lives, practices, and stories. Contributors’ detailed ethnographic work analyzes the union and mutual shaping of water and social lives. This volume discusses current ecological disturbances and engages in a world where unbounded relationalities and unsettled frames of orientation mark the lives of all, anthropologists included. Water emerges as a fluid object in more senses than one, challenging anthropologists to foreground the mutable character of their objects of study and to responsibly engage with the generative role of cultural analysis.

    Read Introduction: Waterworlds at Large

     

    Ecotourism, Local Knowledge, and Nature Therapies in Okinawa
    Andrea E. Murray

    Volume 40, New Directions in Anthropology

     

    The economic imperative of sustainable tourism development frequently shapes life on small subtropical islands. In Okinawa, ecotourism promises to provide employment for a dwindling population of rural youth while preserving the natural environment and bolstering regional pride. Footprints in Paradise explores the transformation in community and sense of place as Okinawans come to view themselves through the lens of the visiting tourist consumer, and as their language, landscapes, and wildlife are reconstituted as treasured and vulnerable resources. The rediscovery and revaluing of local ecological knowledge strengthens Okinawan or Uchinaa cultural heritage, despite the controversial presence of US military bases amidst a hegemonic Japanese state.

    Read Introduction: “We Want Them to Know Nature

     

    The Greenpeace Anti-Whaling Campaign in Norway
    Juliane Riese

    Volume 21, Protest, Culture & Society

     

    In the popular imagination, no issue has been more closely linked with the environmental group Greenpeace than whaling. Opposition to commercial whaling has inspired many of the organization’s most dramatic and high-profile “direct actions”—as well as some of its most notable failures. This book provides an inside look at one such instance: Greenpeace’s decades-long campaign against the Norwegian whaling industry. Combining historical narrative with systems-theory analysis, author Juliane Riese shows how the organization’s self-presentation as a David pitted against whale-butchering Goliaths was turned on its head. She recounts how opponents successfully discredited the campaign while Greenpeace struggled with internal disagreements and other organizational challenges, providing valuable lessons for other protest movements.

    Read Introduction: Observing Greenpeace through the Systems-theoretic Lens

     

    Development, Tourism and the Politics of Benevolence in Mozambique
    João Afonso Baptista

    Volume 30, EASA Series

     

    Drawing on ethnographic research in the village of Canhane, which is host to the first community tourism project in Mozambique, The Good Holiday explores the confluence of two powerful industries: tourism and development, and explains when, how and why tourism becomes development and development, tourism. The volume further explores the social and material consequences of this merging, presenting the confluence of tourism and development as a major vehicle for the exercise of ethics, and non-state governance in contemporary life.

    Read Introduction

     

    A Sociological Study
    Ketil Skogen, Olve Krange, and Helene Figari

    NEW SERIES: Volume 1, Interspecies Encounters

     

    Wolf populations have recently made a comeback in Northern Europe and North America. These large carnivores can cause predictable conflicts by preying on livestock, and competing with hunters for game. But their arrivals often become deeply embedded in more general societal tensions, which arise alongside processes of social change that put considerable pressure on rural communities and on the rural working class in particular. Based on research and case studies conducted in Norway, Wolf Conflicts discusses various aspects of this complex picture, including conflicts over land use and conservation, and more general patterns of hegemony and resistance in modern societies.

    Read Introduction

     

    WHEN THINGS BECOME PROPERTY
    Land Reform, Authority and Value in Postsocialist Europe and Asia
    Thomas Sikor, Stefan Dorondel, Johannes Stahl and Phuc Xuan To

    Volume 3, Max Planck Studies in Anthropology and Economy

     

    Governments have conferred ownership titles to many citizens throughout the world in an effort to turn things into property. Almost all elements of nature have become the target of property laws, from the classic preoccupation with land to more ephemeral material, such as air and genetic resources. When Things Become Property interrogates the mixed outcomes of conferring ownership by examining postsocialist land and forest reforms in Albania, Romania and Vietnam, and finds that property reforms are no longer, if they ever were, miracle tools available to governments for refashioning economies, politics or environments.

    Read Introduction: Turning things into property

     

    A Biosocial Approach
    Edited by Catherine M. Hill, Amanda D. Webber and Nancy E. C. Priston

    Volume 9, Studies of the Biosocial Society

     

    Conflicts about wildlife are usually portrayed and understood as resulting from the negative impacts of wildlife on human livelihoods or property. However, a greater depth of analysis reveals that many instances of human-wildlife conflict are often better understood as people-people conflict, wherein there is a clash of values between different human groups. Understanding Conflicts About Wildlife unites academics and practitioners from across the globe to develop a holistic view of these interactions. It considers the political and social dimensions of ‘human-wildlife conflicts’ alongside effective methodological approaches, and will be of value to academics, conservationists and policy makers.

    Read Introduction: Complex Problems: Using a Biosocial Approach to Understanding Human-Wildlife Interactions

     

    Development Paradoxes, Belonging and Participation of the Baka in East Cameroon
    Glory M. Lueong

     

    Development interventions often generate contradictions around questions of who benefits from development and which communities are targeted for intervention. This book examines how the Baka, who live in Eastern Cameroon, assert forms of belonging in order to participate in development interventions, and how community life is shaped and reshaped through these interventions. Often referred to as ‘forest people’, the Baka have witnessed many recent development interventions that include competing and contradictory policies such as ‘civilize’, assimilate and integrate the Baka into ‘full citizenship’, conserve the forest and wildlife resources, and preserve indigenous cultures at the verge of extinction.

    Read Introduction

     

    Resource Politics, Migration, and Climate Change
    Edited by Robert Orttung

    NEW SERIES: Volume 2, Studies in the Circumpolar North

     

    Urban areas in Arctic Russia are experiencing unprecedented social and ecological change. This collection outlines the key challenges that city managers will face in navigating this shifting political, economic, social, and environmental terrain. In particular, the volume examines how energy production drives a boom-bust cycle in the Arctic economy, explores how migrants from Muslim cultures are reshaping the social fabric of northern cities, and provides a detailed analysis of climate change and its impact on urban and industrial infrastructure.

    Read Chapter 1. Russia’s Arctic Cities: Recent Evolution and Drivers of Change


    Environmental Anthropology and Ethnobiology Series


    Interest in environmental anthropology and ethnobiological knowledge has grown steadily in recent years, reflecting national and international concern about the environment and developing research priorities. `Studies in Environmental Anthropology and Ethnobiology’ is an international series based at the University of Kent at Canterbury. It is a vehicle for publishing up-to-date monographs and edited works on particular issues, themes, places or peoples which focus on the interrelationship between society, culture and the environment.

     

     

    Volume 22

    INDIGENEITY AND THE SACRED
    Indigenous Revival and the Conservation of Sacred Natural Sites in the Americas
    Edited by Fausto Sarmiento and Sarah Hitchner

     

    This book presents current research in the political ecology of indigenous revival and its role in nature conservation in critical areas in the Americas. An important contribution to evolving studies on conservation of sacred natural sites (SNS), the book elucidates the complexity of development scenarios within cultural landscapes related to the appropriation of religion, environmental change in indigenous territories, and new conservation management approaches. Indigeneity and the Sacred explores how these struggles for land, rights, and political power are embedded within physical landscapes, and how indigenous identity is reconstituted as globalizing forces simultaneously threaten and promote the notion of indigeneity.

    Read Introduction

     

    TREES, KNOTS, AND OUTRIGGERS
    Environmental Knowledge in the Northeast Kula Ring
    Frederick H. Damon

     

    Trees, Knots and Outriggers (Kaynen Muyuw) is the culmination of twenty-five years of work by Frederick H. Damon and his attention to cultural adaptations to the environment in Melanesia. Damon details the intricacies of indigenous knowledge and practice in his sweeping synthesis of symbolic and structuralist anthropology with recent developments in historical ecology. This book is a long conversation between the author’s many Papua New Guinea informants, teachers and friends, and scientists in Australia, Europe and the United States, in which a spirit of adventure and discovery is palpable.

    Related Link: This book is accompanied by a large online repository of images:
    https://pages.shanti.virginia.edu/Trees_Knots__Outriggers/

    Read Introduction

     

    BEYOND THE LENS OF CONSERVATION
    Malagasy and Swiss Imaginations of One Another
    Eva Keller

     

    “This book will make a great addition to undergraduate courses on Anthropology of the Environment and/or Development or Political Ecology. Keller’s highly readable style, in turn, will satisfy both those new to the subject and scholars already familiar with the topics of conservation practice in Madagascar. It could even become an important resource for those conservation experts who are trying – and (as the study shows) failing – to establish connections between distant places and people.” · Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute

    The global agenda of Nature conservation has led to the creation of the Masoala National Park in Madagascar and to an exhibit in its support at a Swiss zoo, the centerpiece of which is a mini-rainforest replica. Does such a cooperation also trigger a connection between ordinary people in these two far-flung places? The study investigates how the Malagasy farmers living at the edge of the park perceive the conservation enterprise and what people in Switzerland see when looking towards Madagascar through the lens of the zoo exhibit.

    Read Introduction

     

    SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT
    An Appraisal from the Gulf Region
    Edited by Paul Sillitoe

     

    With growing evidence of unsustainable use of the world’s resources, such as hydrocarbon reserves, and related environmental pollution, as in alarming climate change predictions, sustainable development is arguably the prominent issue of the 21st century. This volume gives a wide ranging introduction focusing on the arid Gulf region, where the challenges of sustainable development are starkly evident. The Gulf relies on non-renewable oil and gas exports to supply the world’s insatiable CO2 emitting energy demands, and has built unsustainable conurbations with water supplies dependent on energy hungry desalination plants and deep aquifers pumped beyond natural replenishment rates. Sustainable Development has an interdisciplinary focus, bringing together university faculty and government personnel from the Gulf, Europe, and North America — including social and natural scientists, environmentalists and economists, architects and planners — to discuss topics such as sustainable natural resource use and urbanization, industrial and technological development, economy and politics, history and geography.

    Read Introduction: Sustainable Development in the Gulf: Some Introductory Remarks


    BERGHAHN JOURNALS

     

    Environment and Society
    Advances in Research

     

    Environment and Society publishes critical reviews of the latest research literature on environmental studies, including subjects of theoretical, methodological, substantive, and applied significance.

     

    Nature and Culture

     

    Nature and Culture is a forum to present, discuss, and evaluate critical issues and themes related to the historical and contemporary relationships that societies, civilizations, empires, regions, and nation-states have with nature.

     

     

    Transfers
    Interdisciplinary Journal of Mobility Studies

     

    Transfers is a peer-reviewed journal publishing cutting-edge research on the processes, structures, and consequences of the movement of people, resources, and commodities.

     

    Regiones y Cohesión / Régions et Cohésion

     

    The journal promotes the comparative examination of the human and environmental impacts of various aspects of regional integration across geographic areas, time periods, and policy arenas.

     

    Journal of Global and Historical Anthropology

     

    The journal strives for the resurrection of an “anthropology at large” that can accommodate issues of the global south, postsocialism, mobility, metropolitan experience, capitalist power, and popular resistance into integrated perspectives.

     

  • Berghahn Journals Blog

    Women’s Equality Day

    Women’s Equality Day is celebrated each year on August 26th to commemorate the 19th Amendment to the Constitution, granting women the right to vote.
    Today the observance of Women’s Equality Day has grown to mean much more than just sharing the right to the vote, but also calls attention to women’s continuing efforts toward full equality. Numerous International organisations continue to work to provide women across the globe with equal opportunities to education and employment, pushing against suppression and violence towards women and against the discrimination and stereotyping which still occur in every society. For more information on the history and for further resources please visit www.nwhp.org

     


    Explore a special issue of Aspasia devoted to women’s and gender history.


    We are also pleased to offer a limited time 25% discount on all Gender Studies titles. For the next 30 days visit our website and use discount code GE2017 at checkout.

     

     

    Edited by Susanne Buckley-Zistel and Ulrike Krause

    Volume 37 Forced Migration

     

    Providing nuanced accounts of how the social identities of men and women, the context of displacement and the experience or manifestation of violence interact, this collection offers conceptual analyses and in-depth case studies to illustrate how gender relations are affected by displacement, encampment and return. The essays show how these factors lead to various forms of direct, indirect and structural violence. This ranges from discussions of norms reflected in policy documents and practise, the relationship between relief structures and living conditions in camps, to forced military recruitment and forced return, and covers countries in Africa, Asia and Europe.

     

    Impacts and Outcomes
    Edited by Kristina Schulz

    Volume 22, Protest, Culture & Society

     

    For over half a century, the countless organizations and initiatives that comprise the Women’s Liberation movement have helped to reshape many aspects of Western societies, from public institutions and cultural production to body politics and subsequent activist movements. This collection represents the first systematic investigation of WLM’s cumulative impacts and achievements within the West. Here, specialists on movements in Europe systematically investigate outcomes in different countries in the light of a reflective social movement theory, comparing them both implicitly and explicitly to developments in other parts of the world.

    Read Introduction: A Success without Impact? Case Studies from the Women’s Liberation Movement’s in Europe

     

    GENDER IN GEORGIA
    Feminist Perspectives on Culture, Nation, and History in the South Caucasus
    Edited by Maia Barkaia and Alisse Waterston

     

    “This volume is a wonderful and essential contribution to an understudied but critical area of interest.” · Fran Mascia-Lees, Rutgers University

    As Georgia seeks to reinvent itself as a nation-state in the post-Soviet period, Georgian women are maneuvering, adjusting, resisting and transforming the new economic, social and political order. In Gender in Georgia, editors Maia Barkaia and Alisse Waterston bring together an international group of feminist scholars to explore the socio-political and cultural conditions that have shaped gender dynamics in Georgia from the late 19th century to the present. In doing so, they provide the first-ever woman-centered collection of research on Georgia, offering a feminist critique of power in its many manifestations, and an assessment of women’s political agency in Georgia.

     

    Militant Feminisms in the Federal Republic of Germany since 1968
    Katharina Karcher

    Volume 38, Monographs in German History

     

    Few figures in modern German history are as central to the public memory of radical protest than Ulrike Meinhof, but she was only the most prominent of the countless German women—and militant male feminists—who supported and joined in revolutionary actions from the 1960s onward. Sisters in Arms gives a bracing account of how feminist ideas were enacted by West German leftist organizations from the infamous Red Army Faction to less well-known groups such as the Red Zora. It analyzes their confrontational and violent tactics in challenging the abortion ban, opposing violence against women, and campaigning for solidarity with Third World women workers. Though these groups often diverged ideologically and tactically, they all demonstrated the potency of militant feminism within postwar protest movements.

    Read Introduction

     

    Feminism and Generational Conflict in Recent German Literature and Film
    Margaret McCarthy

     

    The last two decades have been transformational, often discordant ones for German feminism, as a new cohort of activists has come of age and challenged many of the movement’s strategic and philosophical orthodoxies. Mad Mädchen offers an incisive analysis of these trans-generational debates, identifying the mother-daughter themes and other tropes that have defined their representation in German literature, film, and media. Author Margaret McCarthy investigates female subjectivity as it processes political discourse to define itself through both differences and affinities among women. Ultimately, such a model suggests new ways of re-imagining feminist solidarity across generational, ethnic, and racial lines.

    Read Introduction

     

    HONOUR AND VIOLENCE
    Gender, Power and Law in Southern Pakistan
    Nafisa Shah

    Volume 39, New Directions in Anthropology

     

    The practice of karo kari allows family, especially fathers, brothers and sons, to take the lives of their daughters, sisters and mothers if they are accused of adultery. This volume examines the central position of karo kari in the social, political and juridical structures in Upper Sindh, Pakistan. Drawing connections between local contests over marriage and resources, Nafisa Shah unearths deep historical processes and power relations. In particular, she explores how the state justice system and informal mediations inform each other in state responses to karo kari, and how modern law is implicated in this seemingly ancient cultural practice.

    Read Introduction: Honour Violence, Law and Power in Upper Sindh

     

    Autobiographical and Biographical Experiences
    Edited by Shirley Ardener, Fiona Armitage-Woodward, and Lidia Dina Sciama

     

    Drawing on family materials, historical records, and eyewitness accounts, this book shows the impact of war on individual women caught up in diverse and often treacherous situations. It relates stories of partisans in Holland, an Italian woman carrying guns and provisions in the face of hostile soldiers, and Kikuyu women involved in the Mau Mau insurrection in Kenya. A woman displaced from Silesia recalls fleeing with children across war-torn Germany, and women caught up in conflicts in Burma and in Rwanda share their tales. War’s aftermath can be traumatic, as shown by journalists in Libya and by a midwife on the Cambodian border who helps refugees to give birth and regain hope. Finally, British women on active service in Afghanistan and at NATO headquarters also speak.

    Read Introduction: Women’s Autobiographical and Biographical Experiences of War across Continents: An Introduction

     

    GIRLHOOD AND THE POLITICS OF PLACE
    Edited by Claudia Mitchell and Carrie Rentschler

    This title is available Open Access under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License and published in partnership with Knowledge Unlatched.

     

    Examining context-specific conditions in which girls live, learn, work, play, and organize deepens the understanding of place-making practices of girls and young women worldwide. Focusing on place across health, literary and historical studies, art history, communications, media studies, sociology, and education allows for investigations of how girlhood is positioned in relation to interdisciplinary and transnational research methodologies, media environments, geographic locations, history, and social spaces. This book offers a comprehensive reading on how girlhood scholars construct and deploy research frameworks that directly engage girls in the research process.

    Read Introduction: The Significance of Place in Girlhood Studies 

     

    NEW IMAGINARIES
    Youthful Reinvention of Ukraine’s Cultural Paradigm
    Edited and Translated by Marian J. Rubchak
    Foreword Martha Kichorowska Kebalo

     

    Having been spared the constraints imposed upon intellectual discourse by the totalitarian regime of the past, young Ukrainian scholars now engage with many Western ideological theories and practices in an atmosphere of intellectual freedom and uncensored scholarship. In displacing the Soviet legacy of prescribed thought and practices, this volume’s female contributors have infused their work with Western elements, although vestiges of Soviet-style ideas, research methodology and writing linger. The result is a paradigm articulating the “New Imaginaries” — neither Soviet nor Western — a unique approach to studying gender that offers a portrait of Ukrainian society as seen through the eyes of a new generation of feminist scholars.

    Read Introduction

     

    Networks, Biographies, Gender Orders
    Edited by Oliver Janz and Daniel Schönpflug

     

    Recent debates have used the concept of “transnational history” to broaden research on historical subjects that transcend national boundaries and encourage a shift away from official inter-state interactions to institutions, groups, and actors that have been obscured. This approach proves particularly fruitful for the dynamic field of global gender and women’s history. By looking at the restless lives and work of women’s activists in informal border-crossings, ephemeral NGOs, the lower management of established international organizations, and other global networks, this volume reflects the potential of a new perspective that allows for a more adequate analysis of transnational activities. By pointing out cultural hierarchies, the vicissitudes of translation and re-interpretation, and the ambiguity of intercultural exchange, this volume demonstrates the critical potential of transnational history. It allows us to see the limits of universalist and cosmopolitan claims so dear to many historical actors and historians.

     

    A Gendered Perspective on Ottoman Urban History
    Edited by Nazan Maksudyan

     

    An attempt to reveal, recover and reconsider the roles, positions, and actions of Ottoman women, this volume reconsiders the negotiations, alliances, and agency of women in asserting themselves in the public domain in late- and post-Ottoman cities. Drawing on diverse theoretical backgrounds and a variety of source materials, from court records to memoirs to interviews, the contributors to the volume reconstruct the lives of these women within the urban sphere. With a fairly wide geographical span, from Aleppo to Sofia, from Jeddah to Istanbul, the chapters offer a wide panorama of the Ottoman urban geography, with a specific concern for gender roles.

     

    Paperback! 

    MAPPING DIFFERENCE
    The Many Faces of Women in Contemporary Ukraine
    Edited by Marian J. Rubchak
    Foreword by Catherine Wanner

     

    “Notably the authors resist the temptation to proclaim varied strategies proof of an actually existing feminism, offering instead a multi-voiced and rich narrative of the transformation of women’s position in post-Soviet Ukraine.” · Social Analysis

    Drawn from various disciplines and a broad spectrum of research interests, these essays reflect on the challenging issues confronting women in Ukraine today. The contributors are an interdisciplinary, transnational group of scholars from gender studies, feminist theory, history, anthropology, sociology, women’s studies, and literature. Among the issues they address are: the impact of migration, education, early socialization of gender roles, the role of the media in perpetuating and shaping negative stereotypes, the gendered nature of language, women and the media, literature by women, and local appropriation of gender and feminist theory. Each author offers a fresh and unique perspective on the current process of survival strategies and postcommunist identity reconstruction among Ukrainian women in their current climate of patriarchalism.

     

    Women, Migration, and the Diaspora
    Edited by Haci Akman

     

    Gender has a profound impact on the discourse on migration as well as various aspects of integration, social and political life, public debate, and art. This volume focuses on immigration and the concept of diaspora through the experiences of women living in Norway, Sweden, and Denmark. Through a variety of case studies, the authors approach the multifaceted nature of interactions between these women and their adopted countries, considering both the local and the global. The text examines the “making of the Scandinavian” and the novel ways in which diasporic communities create gendered forms of belonging that transcend the nation state.

     

     


     

    Berghahn Journals

     

    An Interdisciplinary Journal

    WINNER OF THE 2009 AAP/PSP PROSE AWARD FOR BEST NEW JOURNAL IN THE SOCIAL SCIENCES & HUMANITIES!

    Follow @GirlhoodStudies

     

    Girlhood Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal is a peer-reviewed journal providing a forum for the critical discussion of girlhood from a variety of disciplinary perspectives, and for the dissemination of current research and reflections on girls’ lives to a broad, cross-disciplinary audience of scholars, researchers, practitioners in the fields of education, social service and health care and policy makers. International and interdisciplinary in scope, it is committed to feminist, anti-discrimination, anti-oppression approaches and solicits manuscripts from a variety of disciplines.

     

    The International Yearbook of Central, Eastern, and Southeastern European Women’s and Gender History 

    Special Issue: A Hundred Years of International Women’s Day in CESEE

     

    Aspasia is the international peer-reviewed annual of women’s and gender history of Central, Eastern, and Southeastern Europe (CESEE). It aims to transform European women’s and gender history by expanding comparative research on women and gender to all parts of Europe, creating a European history of women and gender that encompasses more than the traditional Western European perspective.

     

     

     

     

     

     

  • Berghahn Journals Blog

    International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples

    Despite their cultural differences, indigenous peoples from around the world share common problems related to preservation of their unique cultures and protection of their rights to traditional lands and natural resources that have always been violated. This day promotes the recognition that special measures are required to protect their rights and maintain their distinct cultures and way of life. For more information on background, events and resources please visit http://www.un.org/en/events/indigenousday.

    In marking this year’s observance, Berghahn is pleased to feature a selection of books of related interest and offer a 25% discount on all Indigenous Studies titles. For the next 30 days use discount code IP17 at checkout.


     

    Indigenous Revival and the Conservation of Sacred Natural Sites in the Americas
    Edited by Fausto Sarmiento and Sarah Hitchner

    Volume 22, Environmental Anthropology and Ethnobiology

     

    This book presents current research in the political ecology of indigenous revival and its role in nature conservation in critical areas in the Americas. An important contribution to evolving studies on conservation of sacred natural sites (SNS), the book elucidates the complexity of development scenarios within cultural landscapes related to the appropriation of religion, environmental change in indigenous territories, and new conservation management approaches. Indigeneity and the Sacred explores how these struggles for land, rights, and political power are embedded within physical landscapes, and how indigenous identity is reconstituted as globalizing forces simultaneously threaten and promote the notion of indigeneity.

    Read Introduction

     

    Environmental Knowledge in the Northeast Kula Ring
    Frederick H. Damon

    Volume 21, Environmental Anthropology and Ethnobiology

     

    Trees, Knots and Outriggers (Kaynen Muyuw) is the culmination of twenty-five years of work by Frederick H. Damon and his attention to cultural adaptations to the environment in Melanesia. Damon details the intricacies of indigenous knowledge and practice in his sweeping synthesis of symbolic and structuralist anthropology with recent developments in historical ecology. This book is a long conversation between the author’s many Papua New Guinea informants, teachers and friends, and scientists in Australia, Europe and the United States, in which a spirit of adventure and discovery is palpable.

    Read Introduction

    Related Link: This book is accompanied by a large online repository of images: https://pages.shanti.virginia.edu/Trees_Knots__Outriggers/

     

    Leadership, Masculinity and Wealth in the Amazon
    Marc Brightman

     

    Amerindian societies have an iconic status in classical political thought. For Montaigne, Hobbes, Locke, Hume and Rousseau, the native American ‘state of nature’ operates as a foil for the European polity. Challenging this tradition, The Imbalance of Power demonstrates ethnographically that the Carib speaking indigenous societies of the Guiana region of Amazonia do not fit conventional characterizations of ‘simple’ political units with ‘egalitarian’ political ideologies and ‘harmonious’ relationships with nature. Marc Brightman builds a persuasive and original theory of Amerindian politics: far from balanced and egalitarian, Carib societies are rife with tension and difference; but this imbalance conditions social dynamism and a distinctive mode of cohesion. The Imbalance of Power is based on the author’s fieldwork in partnership with Vanessa Grotti, who is working on a companion volume entitled Living with the Enemy: First Contacts and the Making of Christian Bodies in Amazonia.

    Read Introduction

     

    Confronting Electoral Communism and Precarious Livelihoods in Post-Reform Kerala
    Luisa Steur

    Volume 20, Dislocations

     

    In Kerala, political activists with a background in Communism are now instead asserting political demands on the basis of indigenous identity. Why did a notion of indigenous belonging come to replace the discourse of class in subaltern struggles? Indigenist Mobilization answers this question through a detailed ethnographic study of the dynamics between the Communist party and indigenist activists, and the subtle ways in which global capitalist restructuring leads to a resonance of indigenist visions in the changing everyday working lives of subaltern groups in Kerala.

    Read Introduction: Research and Activism in, on, and Beyond a Capitalist World System

     

    Embodiment and Experience among the Orang Rimba of Sumatra
    Ramsey Elkholy
    Foreword by Tim Ingold, University of Aberdeen

     

    For the Orang Rimba of Sumatra – and tropical foragers in general – life in the forest engenders a kind of “connectedness” that is contingent not only on harmonious relations between people, but also between people and the non-human environment, including those supernatural agencies of the forest that people depend on for their spiritual and emotional wellbeing. Exploring this world, anthropologist Ramsey Elkholy treats embodied action and perception as the basis of shared experience and shows how various forms of embodied experience constitute the very foundations of human culture. In a unique methodological contribution, Elkholy adopts a set of body-centered approaches that reflect and capture the day-to-day, moment-to-moment ways in which people engage with the world. Being and Becoming is an important contribution to phenomenological anthropology, hunter-gatherer studies, and to Southeast Asian ethnography more generally.

    Read Introduction

     

    Development Paradoxes, Belonging and Participation of the Baka in East Cameroon
    Glory M. Lueong

     

    Development interventions often generate contradictions around questions of who benefits from development and which communities are targeted for intervention. This book examines how the Baka, who live in Eastern Cameroon, assert forms of belonging in order to participate in development interventions, and how community life is shaped and reshaped through these interventions. Often referred to as ‘forest people’, the Baka have witnessed many recent development interventions that include competing and contradictory policies such as ‘civilize’, assimilate and integrate the Baka into ‘full citizenship’, conserve the forest and wildlife resources, and preserve indigenous cultures at the verge of extinction.

    Read Introduction

     

    Conceptions of Personhood in a Papua New Guinea Society
    Franziska A. Herbst

    Volume 5, Person, Space and Memory in the Contemporary Pacific

     

    Biomedical Entanglements is an ethnographic study of the Giri people of Papua New Guinea, focusing on the indigenous population’s interaction with modern medicine. In her fieldwork, Franziska A. Herbst follows the Giri people as they circulate within and around ethnographic sites that include a rural health center and an urban hospital. The study bridges medical anthropology and global health, exploring how the ‘biomedical’ is imbued with social meaning and how biomedicine affects Giri ways of life.

    Read Introduction

     

    Luck, Spirits and Ambivalence among the Siberian Orochen Reindeer Herders and Hunters
    Donatas Brandišauskas

    NEW SERIES: Volume 1, Studies in the Circumpolar North

     

    Nowhere have recent environmental and social changes been more pronounced than in post-Soviet Siberia. Donatas Brandišauskas probes the strategies that Orochen reindeer herders of southeastern Siberia have developed to navigate these changes. “Catching luck” is one such strategy that plays a central role in Orochen cosmology — luck implies a vernacular theory of causality based on active interactions of humans, non-humans, material objects, and places. Brandišauskas describes in rich details the skills, knowledge, ritual practices, storytelling, and movements that enable the Orochen to “catch luck” (or not, sometimes), to navigate times of change and upheaval.

    Read Introduction: Luck, Spirits and Places

     

    The Gwich’in Natives of Alaska
    Steven C. Dinero

     

    The Gwich’in Natives of Arctic Village, Alaska, have experienced intense social and economic changes for more than a century. In the late 20th century, new transportation and communication technologies introduced radically new value systems; while some of these changes may be seen as socially beneficial, others suggest a weakening of what was once a strong and vibrant Native community. Using quantitative and qualitative data gathered since the turn of the millennium, this volume offers an interdisciplinary evaluation of the developments that have occurred in the community over the past several decades.

    Read Introduction

     

    Studies in Native Amazonian Property Relations
    Edited by Marc Brightman, Carlos Fausto, and Vanessa Grotti
    Foreword by James Leach

     

    The first book to address the classic anthropological theme of property through the ethnography of Amazonia, Ownership and Nurture sets new and challenging terms for anthropological debates about the region and about property in general. Property and ownership have special significance and carry specific meanings in Amazonia, which has been portrayed as the antithesis of Western, property-based, civilization. Through carefully constructed studies of land ownership, slavery, shamanism, spirit mastery, aesthetics, and intellectual property, this volume demonstrates that property relations are of central importance in Amazonia, and that the ownership of persons plays an especially significant role in native cosmology.

    Read Introduction: Altering Ownership in Amazonia

     

    MASKS AND STAFFS
    Identity Politics in the Cameroon Grassfields
    Michaela Pelican

    Volume 11, Integration and Conflict Studies

     

    The Cameroon Grassfields, home to three ethnic groups – Grassfields societies, Mbororo, and Hausa – provide a valuable case study for the anthropological examination of identity politics and interethnic relations. In the midst of the political liberalization of Cameroon in the late 1990s and 2000s, local responses to political and legal changes took the form of a series of performative and discursive expressions of ethnicity. Confrontational encounters stimulated by economic and political rivalry, as well as socially integrative processes, transformed collective self-understanding in Cameroon in conjunction with recent global discourses on human, minority, and indigenous rights. The book provides a vital contribution to the study of ethnicity, conflict, and social change in the anthropology of Africa.

    Read Introduction

     

    Thresholds of Identities and Illusions on an African Landscape
    Stuart A. Marks

     

    “Few academic books display such depth as does this one, but then few anthropologists devote over five decades to the same communities and issues. Anthropologist Marks first worked among Zambia’s Valley Bisa people in 1966, returning frequently for further research. The result is a masterwork of description, interpretation, and self-reflection.” · Choice

    The “extensive wilderness” of Zambia’s central Luangwa Valley is the homeland of the Valley Bisa whose cultural practices have enriched this environment for centuries. Beginning with the intrusions of warlords and later British colonials, successive generations have experienced the callousness and challenges of colonialism. Their homeland, a slender corridor surrounded by three national parks and an escarpment, is a microcosm of the political, economic and cultural battlefields surrounding most African protected areas today. The story of the Valley Bisa diverges from the myths that conservationists, administrators, and philanthropists, tell about Africa’s environmental and wildlife crises.

    Read Introduction: On Poaching an Elephant: Calling the Shots and Following the Ricochets


    Berghahn Journals:

    Editor-in-Chief: Claudia Mitchell, McGill University

    ISSN: 1938-8209 (Print)
    ISSN: 1938-8322 (Online)

    Volume 10/2017, 3 issues p.a. (spring, summer, winter)


    Editor: John P. Ziker, Boise State University

    ISSN: 1361-7362 (Print)
    ISSN: 1476-6787 (Online)

    Volume 16/2017, 3 issues p.a. (spring, summer, winter)

     

     

Top Article Downloads


  1. Under the Shadow of Empire: Indigenous Girls' Presencing as Decolonizing Force
    Girlhood Studies, vol. 7, #1, Summer 2014
  2. Forget Dawkins: Notes toward an Ethnography of Religious Belief and Doubt
    Social Analysis, vol. 59, #2, Summer 2015
  3. Blaming Sexualization for Sexting
    Girlhood Studies, vol. 7, #1, Summer 2014
  4. Out of the Closet? German Patriotism and Soccer Mania
    German Politics & Society, vol.24, #3, Autumn 2006
  5. Rape Culture and the Feminist Politics of Social Media
    Girlhood Studies, vol. 7, #1, Summer 2014
  6. Less Than One But More Than Many: Anthropocene as Science Fiction and Scholarship-in-the-Making
    Environment and Society, vol. 6, #1, Summer 2015
  7. Staging "small, small incidents": Dissent, gender, and militarization among young people in Kashmir
    Focaal, vol. 2011, #60, Summer 2011
  8. An Inquiry into the Roots of the Modern Concept of Development
    Contributions to the History of Concepts, vol. 4, #2, Autumn 2008
  9. Misunderstood, misrepresented, contested? Anthropological knowledge production in question
    Focaal, vol. 2015, #72, Summer 2015
  10. Theatres of virtue: Collaboration, consensus, and the social life of corporate social responsibility
    Focaal, vol. 2011, #60, Summer 2011

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Berghahn Journals is pleased to announce the launch of our new journals online platform starting April 1. We will be working with all subscribers to make the transition process as seamless as possible and will contact you in the coming weeks with more information about access procedures.

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Berghahn Journals: New Issues Published in August

    

SIMULATED SHELVES: Browse August 2017 NEW BOOKS

We’re delighted to offer a selection of latest releases from our core subjects of Anthropology, Archaeology, Colonialism, Economical History, Genocide Studies, Jewish Studies, History, Medical Anthropology, and Refugee and Migration Studies, along with our New in Paperback titles. Paperback Original HOUSE OF THE WATERLILY A Novel of the Ancient Maya World Kelli Carmean   “House of […]

Visit Berghahn Books at The Royal Geographical Society Annual Conference

We are delighted to inform you that we will be attending The Royal Geographical Society Annual Conference in London, from Wednesday 30 August to Friday 1 September 2017. Please stop by our table to browse our latest selection of books at discounted prices and pick up free journal samples. If you are unable to attend, we […]

An Interview with Nafisa Shah, Author of Honour and Violence

The following is an interview with Nafisa Shah about hew new book Honour and Violence: Gender, Power and Law in Southern Pakistan. 1) When did you begin working on Honour and Violence? Can you briefly tell us about your journey as a journalist, scholar, and politician following honor killings in Pakistan? Honour and Violence is […]

Women’s Equality Day

Women’s Equality Day is celebrated each year on August 26th to commemorate the 19th Amendment to the Constitution, granting women the right to vote. Today the observance of Women’s Equality Day has grown to mean much more than just sharing the right to the vote, but also calls attention to women’s continuing efforts toward full equality. Numerous […]