Visit the Berghahn Journals online platform here! Berghahn Books Logo

berghahn New York · Oxford

Home

About us

Berghahn Journals is the journals division of Berghahn Books, an independent scholarly publisher in the humanities and social sciences. A peer-review press, Berghahn is committed to the highest academic standards and seeks to enable innovative contributions to the scholarship in its fields of specialty.

Latest

  • EnviroSociety

    Some Chemical and More-Than-Human Transformations of Sugar/Energy

    Oblivious, or maybe not, to a warming planet and intense global discourse around renewable bioeconomy futures, a tiny sugar molecule one day is synthesized and then makes its way into a cell wall of a sugarcane plant in the southern region of Brazil. This is not the type of sugar that would be found on the kitchen table. The molecule remains there for the life of the plant, offering fibrous structural support for the towering stalks as they grow up to five meters tall. This sugar compound is called cellulose and is found in all plants and several types of microbes. It is the earth’s most abundant biopolymer made on land and its largest carbon reservoir (Li et al. 2014). While not on the kitchen table per se, cellulose is likely in it (if the table is wooden).

    Laboratory greenhouse (photograph by Katie Ulrich).

    Laboratory greenhouse (photograph by Katie Ulrich).

    On a later day, a machine smashes through the sugarcane field to harvest the stalks. The sugarcane plantation’s infamous and violent history, one of colonial slavery and later continuing horrific worker conditions, is not forgotten by nor has disappeared for nearby residents, even as mechanized harvesting changes the local labor metabolism (Mintz 1985; Scheper-Hughes 1992). The harvested sugarcane stalks are transported to a processing facility not too far away, which is owned by a joint venture between Brazilian and US companies.

    At the facility, the stalks are crushed, squeezed, and subjected to chemical and physical pretreatments that begin to degrade the recalcitrant, fibrous portions of the plant. Researchers next inject a cocktail of fungal enzymes, themselves harvested from bacterial cell factories, to experiment with methods to break down cellulose and its relatives into simple, fermentable sugars. Then, yet another organism enters the story: kilograms of yeast are dumped into the vats of digested sugarcane pulp. Over the course of only a few days, as in the process of making beer or wine, the yeast consumes simple sugars and expel liters of alcohol and carbon dioxide gas in return. The mixture is hot and lively, as the release of gas exerts enough energy to agitate and stir the contents, some two kilowatts (Raghavendran et al. 2017). The ethanol produced by the yeast is then collected and later pumped into the tank of a flex-fuel car, a vehicle that can run on gasoline, ethanol, or a combination of the two.

    Taking this process, what would it mean to think closer with the conversions of energy—the changing materialities of the chemical compound of sugar—looping between the multiple beings, and states of being, involved? Sugarcane is used as a feedstock, an energy source, to generate other forms of energy, not for the plant but for certain humans. And to be more precise, it serves as an energy source for another type of being, microbial yeast, before it reaches the humans. Of course, too, sugar in another form fueled the cells of the workers who helped harvest the sugarcane in the first place. What such sugarcane-yeast-bacteria-fungus-human-machine entanglements make clear to me is that a more-than-human, multichemical ethnography can be helpful for opening up thinking on energy—its forms and transformations.

    That is, I believe it is worth tracing transformations of energy across various scales and materials, in ways that matter not only to humans but to the other beings wrapped up in these processes as well. Paying attention to energy on these different registers—energy at what scale, and for whom—can be productive for exploring when energy comes to be energy, and the kinds of relations of use figured in these moments.

    Considering energy as it emerges from cascading relations between both beings and states of being is obviously not limited to renewable fuels; after all, fossil fuels were once living and have undergone their own fascinating material and temporal transformations. Additionally, I think this approach can be especially helpful for an anthropology of emerging sugarcane biotechnologies in Brazil.

    Ethanol made from sugarcane molasses (not the cellulosic material as described above, although the molasses process still involves yeast fermentation) has been produced at a large scale since the 1970s in the country. This biofuel has propelled not only cars but also industrial discourses around Brazil as a global leader for renewable energy.

    More recently, though with advanced genetic engineering methods, research centers and biotechnology companies are aiming to engineer the very metabolism of the yeast, often with genes from other species, to produce not ethanol but your chemical of choice. Such chemicals have included drug compounds, specialty chemicals used in cosmetics and flavorings, and industrial chemicals otherwise derived from petroleum. Millions of dollars in funding from both public and private sources have been put toward such sugar biotechnologies in the past decade, in Brazil as well as abroad.

    The sugarcane plant, too, is not simply a static feedstock. Becoming more widely used is a variety of sugarcane called energy cane, which has been bred to have a higher proportion of fibrous material such as cellulose and less sucrose, the more familiar kind of sugar. Energy cane is desirable, as it has a greater overall biomass than standard sugarcane, extra biomass that can be used to produce extra ethanol or extra specialty chemicals. Energy cane can only generate more total biomass, though, because of its reduced synthesis of sucrose—which for the plant is energetically expensive. Energy thus becomes relevant for energy cane in more way than one.

    In short, sugar, not always in familiar forms, is being advanced as a feedstock for a renewable future. This future is renewable in terms of not only fuels but also the innumerable, ubiquitous commodities currently linked to fossil fuels in more invisible ways. In such future imaginaries, sugar feedstocks form the basis of a new mode of industry, one that entangles multiple (engineered) organisms, labs, and various forms of energy in new chemical and biological relations. Sugar literally energizes this future, both now and then, and in the process reconfigures energy as well as these organisms. And as Sidney Mintz (1985) was attentive to in another moment of sugar transformations, such reconfigurations are never innocent nor even; energy is extracted from someone or something in many conversions into another form.

    Ultimately, this is all to propose that in conversation with the rich anthropological work on energy and its politics, social and global relations, and political economies, paying attention as well to the more-than-human, multichemical aspects of something like emerging sugarcane biotechnologies can help expand thinking on what, when, and for whom something becomes energy (and for whom not). From cellulose in cane plants and the people who harvest them, to simple sugars fermented by yeast, to ethanol and specialty chemicals consumed by other people, returning to the naïve question of “What is energy?” could help make clear productive ways of studying new energy regimes of the twenty-first century.



    Katie Ulrich
    is a PhD student in the Department of Anthropology at Rice University. Her research interests center on the science of sugar and sugarcane in Brazil.



    References

    Li, Shundai, Logan Bashline, Lei Lei, and Ying Gu. 2014. “Cellulose Synthesis and Its Regulation.” Arabidopsis Book 12: e0169. doi:10.1199/tab.0169.

    Mintz, Sidney. 1985. Sweetness and Power: The Place of Sugar in Modern History. New York: Penguin.

    Raghavendran, Vijayendran, Thalita Peixoto Basso, Juliana Bueno da Silva, Luiz Carlos Basso, and Andreas Karoly Gombert. 2017. “A Simple Scaled Down System to Mimic the Industrial Production of First Generation Fuel Ethanol in Brazil.” Antonie van Leeuwenhoek 110 (7): 971–983. doi:10.1007/s10482-017-0868-9.

    Scheper-Hughes, Nancy. 1992. Death Without Weeping: The Violence of Everyday Life in Brazil. Berkeley: University of California Press.



    Cite as: 
    Ulrich, Katie. 2017. “Some Chemical and More-Than-Human Transformations of Sugar/Energy.” EnviroSociety, 21 June. www.envirosociety.org/2017/06/some-chemical-and-more-than-human-transformations-of-sugarenergy.

  • FocaalBlog

    World Refugee Day: Free articles from Berghahn Journals

    The United Nations recognizes World Refugee Day annually on June 20 to raise awareness of and show support for the millions of refugees who have been forced to flee their homes each year. This year, the UN Refugee Agency will also launch its #WithRefugees petition to send a message to governments that they must work together to ensure the rights and safety of refugees.

    To support the efforts of World Refugee Day, Berghahn Journals is offering relevant articles, including one from Focaal with hope that this will contribute to the overall discussion of the lives of refugees.

    *Content is exclusively for the user’s individual, personal, noncommerical use. View full terms and conditions.

    The U.S. Mission is co-sponsoring the exhibition entitled “An Entire Life in a Package” by Israeli artist Orna Ben-Ami at the United Nations Office at Geneva. The exhibit was officially opened on June 20 in light of World Refugee Day, and focuses on refugees and the few belongings they take with them when they leave. The artist is known for her welded iron sculptures combined with treated photographs and charcoal sketches. The exhibit will remain on display until June 30, 2017. U.S. Mission Photo/Eric Bridiers

    The U.S. Mission is co-sponsoring the exhibition entitled “An Entire Life in a Package” by Israeli artist Orna Ben-Ami at the United Nations Office at Geneva. The exhibit was officially opened on June 20 in light of World Refugee Day, and focuses on refugees and the few belongings they take with them when they leave (photo by Eric Bridiers via Flickr, CC BY-ND 2.0).



    Available until June 27

    Immigrant and Refugee Women: Recreating Meaning in Transnational Context,” Denise L. Spitzer
    Anthropology in Action (Volume 14, Issue 1)

    Staying Out of Place: The Being and Becoming of Burundian Refugees in the Camp and the City,” Simon Turner
    Conflict and Society (Volume 2, Issue 1)

    Suspicion and the Economy of Trust among Palestinian Refugees inLebanon,” Leonardo Schiocchet
    The Cambridge Journal of Anthropology (Volume 32, Issue 2)

    From individual grief to a shared history of the Bosnian war: Voice, audience, and the political in psychotherapeutic practices with refugees,” Laura Huttunen
    Focaal (Volume 2014, Issue 68)

    Living an Uncertain Future: Temporality, Uncertainty, and Well-Being among Iraqi Refugees in Egypt,” Nadia El-Shaarawi
    Social Analysis (Volume 59, Issue 1)

     


    Migration and Society
    — Coming in 2018!

    jnl_cover_air-ms

    Migration and Society is an interdisciplinary peer-reviewed journal advancing debate about emergent trends in all types of migration. We invite work that situates migration in a wider historical and societal context, including attention to experiences and representations of migration, critical theoretical perspectives on migration, and the social, cultural, and legal embeddedness of migration. Global in its scope, we particularly encourage scholarship from and about the global South as well as the North.

  • Museum Worlds

    The Black Lives Matter Movement in the National Museum of African American History and Culture

    by Rod Clare, Elon University

    museum-african-american

    It has been over forty years since the mostly successful conclusion of the Civil Rights movement in the United States. While some may have thought the election of an African-American president in 2008 heralded a “postracial” America, continued violence and oppression has brought about a rebirth of activism, embodied by the Black Lives Matter (BLM) movement. Now that nascent movement is preparing to be part of the National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC). The NMAAHC is located at 1400 Constitution Avenue NW, in Washington DC.

    The museum’s overriding goals are to make people aware of African-American history and to foster understanding and reconciliation about race in America and the world. The fact that the BLM movement is so new gives rise to concerns that the museum is collecting material that is too recent, topical, and potentially controversial. Nevertheless, as the director of the NMAAHC, Lonnie Bunch, has made clear, collecting and promoting such material helps “people to realize … that these are not isolated moments. They are part of a long history—a long history of tragedy, but also a long history of resilience and protest.”1

    Though seemingly radical, Bunch’s approach is not without precedent when it comes to museums representing African-American lives (and deaths). A recent example of this is Kehinde Wiley’s exhibit, Kehinde Wiley: A New Republic, presented from February to May 2015, at the Brooklyn Museum in New York. Superimposing modern blacks onto classical Western art reliefs, Wiley’s work made one patron comment that “the fact that they have an exhibit like this maybe could revitalize that conversation again about Black Lives Matter.”2

    A symposium on “History, Rebellion, and Reconciliation,” held at the Smithsonian in April 2015, discussed in part the fatal shooting of an African-American youth in Ferguson, Missouri, in the previous year. A reoccurring theme at the symposium was that museums could offer neutral “‘safe,’ or even ‘sacred’ spaces, within which visitors could wrestle with difficult and complex topics.”3 Currently, there is no better example of a more controversial and nuanced topic in America than the Black Lives Matter movement.

    The BLM movement, born in 2013, was indirectly created out of decades of frustration within the African-American community over the legal system’s continual exoneration of those who had taken black lives. Often, those killed had transgressed supposed spatial boundaries, an issue in the past (for example, when a black youth “strayed” into a white section of a public beach, and responses by whites instigated the Chicago riots of 1919 that took thirty-eight lives), as much as the present. BLM’s direct genesis came as a result of the not-guilty verdict against George Zimmerman, who stalked and killed Trayvon Martin, a seventeen-year-old black youth who Zimmerman thought was in the wrong part of town in Sanford, Florida. Three black women (Patrisse Cullors, Alicia Garza, and Opal Tometi), all activists in the African-American community, viewed the verdict with shock, anger, and an underlying belief that something had to be done. Due to their drive and to further instances of black lives being taken, with ensuing rebellions in cities like Ferguson, Missouri, and Baltimore, Maryland, the movement has quickly taken off. Currently the BLM movement has approximately two dozen chapters throughout the United States as well as chapters in Ghana and Canada.

    Implicit in the rise of BLM and its attendant demands and concerns is the long-standing issue of black mobility. That is, where can black people go and when can they go there? This question is not only relevant for African Americans currently but also in their arduous history in America. The idea of black mobility has been a fundamental query since African Americans were brought to America as enslaved people. As such, their movements and associations were always strictly monitored and in many cases, prohibited by laws, slave patrols, and other means. After the end of slavery, this remained the case in the South and indeed in other parts of the country well into the twentieth century through the implementation of Black Codes, Ku Klux Klan terrorism, sharecropping contracts, city zoning laws, segregation, and various other means.

    In fact, it can be said that blacks gained any semblance of true mobility in the country only in the early 1970s when the last host of Civil Rights laws became implemented and enforced. Two generations later, it is fitting that some have described the BLM protests as the new Civil Rights movement. In a sense, BLM seeks to answer the question of whether or not some fifty years later black lives are truly valued as equal to all others in the country. From the U.S. government’s COINTELPRO assassination and disruption programs against black activists in the late 1960s and 1970s to the “stop and frisk” police sweeps since the 1990s and incidents such as the arrest of Sandra Bland in 2015, the curtailment of black movement makes the answer decidedly mixed.

    The relevancy and emotions concerning the lasting effects of what has been labeled America’s “original sin” makes it a timely yet somewhat uncomfortable issue for a museum to embrace. This then begs the question, “what exactly is the purpose of a museum?” The International Council of Museums (ICOM) defines it as “a non-profit, permanent institution in the service of society and its development, open to the public, which acquires, conserves, researches, communicates and exhibits the tangible and intangible heritage of humanity and its environment for the purposes of education, study and enjoyment.”4 Most people would tend to define a museum as a place where old, if not ancient, objects are put on display to be reviewed in a genteel fashion. This might make it seem that only the elite patronize museums but nothing could be further from the truth. According to the American Alliance of Museums, some 850 million visits occur each year in American museums, more than all major organized sports put together.5

    What Lonnie Bunch, NMAAHC’s director, wants to do is bring a current and controversial topic to the most respected of American museums, the Smithsonian. As Bunch put it in an interview with National Public Radio,

    One of the jobs of a museum is to not only look back, but to look forward. And so once I heard about [the demonstrations] I knew it was very important to make sure that we collected material that might help a curator 20 years from now or 50 years from now look back and tell the story of the changing notions of race in America.6

    Some of the items Bunch prioritizes for collection include banners, posters, gas masks, and a 4’ by 7’ panel of wood used to protect stores during the disturbances, which has printed on it “hands up,” along with cell phone videos and photos. A purpose of the NMAAHC, Bunch notes, is to place racial conflict and historical events in context, to make people realize that there are “moments of possibility,” where fundamental change and progress can be made. There will certainly be more material for the NMAAHC to collect based on the BLM’s new (as of August 2015) ten-point policy directive, Campaign Zero, directed at state and federal policing authorities.7 Though many may not link the two, the BLM movement is linked to the Constitution, for both have at their core the idea “to form a more perfect union.” This ideal, encompassing issues of life, liberty, and freedom of movement, is as radical and patriotic as the symbolism of what it means to be free in America.

     


     

    This exhibit review originally appeared in volume 6, issue 1 of Transfers: Interdisciplinary Journal of Mobility Studies.


     

    Notes

    1. National Public Radio (NPR), “Black Lives Matter: Coming to a Museum Near You?” 1 August 2015, http://www.npr.org/sections/codeswitch/2015/08/01/428085104/black-lives-matter-coming-to-a-museum-near-you. National Public Radio (accessed 12 September 2015).
    1. “At the Brooklyn Museum, Art Helps Show Why Black Lives Matter,” Aljazeera America, http://america.aljazeera.com/articles/2015/3/2/kehinde-wiley-showat-brooklyn-museum.html (accessed 11 September 2015).
    1. “Why Museums Should be a Safe Space to Discuss Why #BlackLivesMatter,” Smithsonian.com, http://www.smithsonianmag.com/smithsonian-institution/whymuseums-should-be-safe-space-discuss-why-black-lives-matter-180955114/?-no-ist (accessed 12 September 2015).
    1. “Museum Defi nition,” International Council of Museums, http://icom.museum/the-vision/museum-defi nition/ (accessed 12 September 2015).
    1. “Museum Facts,” American Alliance of Museums, http://www.aam-us.org/about-museums/museum-facts (accessed 16 August 2015).NPR, “Black Lives Matter: Coming to a Museum Near You?”
    1. “Solutions Overview,” Solutions: Campaign Zero, http://www.joincampaignzero.org/solutions/#solutionsoverview (accessed 13 September 2015).

  • Berghahn Journals Blog

    World Refugee Day 2017

     

    In marking this year’s observance, Berghahn is pleased to feature a selection of books of related interest and offer a 25% discount on all Refugee and Migration Studies titles. For the next 30 days use discount code REF17 at checkout.

     


    Cambodians in the United States
    Carol A. Mortland

     

    Grace after Genocide is the first comprehensive ethnography of Cambodian refugees, charting their struggle to transition from life in agrarian Cambodia to survival in post-industrial America, while maintaining their identities as Cambodians. The ethnography contrasts the lives of refugees who arrived in America after 1975, with their focus on Khmer traditions, values, and relations, with those of their children who, as descendants of the Khmer Rouge catastrophe, have struggled to become Americans in a society that defines them as different. The ethnography explores America’s mid-twentieth century involvement in Southeast Asia and its enormous consequences on multiple generations of Khmer refugees.

    Read Introduction: From Cambodians to Refugees

     

    CHILDREN OF THE CAMP
    The Lives of Somali Youth Raised in Kakuma Refugee Camp, Kenya
    Catherine-Lune Grayson

     

    Chronic violence has characterized Somalia for over two decades, forcing nearly two million people to flee. A significant number have settled in camps in neighboring countries, where children were born and raised. Based on in-depth fieldwork, this book explores the experience of Somalis who grew up in Kakuma refugee camp, in Kenya, and are now young adults. This original study carefully considers how young people perceive their living environment and how growing up in exile structures their view of the past and their country of origin, and the future and its possibilities.

     

    Germany from 1945 to the Present
    Edited by Cornelia Wilhelm
    Preface by Konrad Jarausch

    Volume 21, Contemporary European History

     

    Within Germany, policies and cultural attitudes toward migrants have been profoundly shaped by the difficult legacies of the Second World War and its aftermath. This wide-ranging volume explores the complex history of migration and diversity in Germany from 1945 to today, showing how conceptions of “otherness” developed while memories of the Nazi era were still fresh, and identifying the continuities and transformations they exhibited through the Cold War and reunification. It provides invaluable context for understanding contemporary Germany’s unique role within regional politics at a time when an unprecedented influx of immigrants and refugees present the European community with a significant challenge.

    Read Introduction

     

    Edited by Jason Coy, Jared Poley, and Alexander Schunka

    Volume 13, Spektrum: Publications of the German Studies Association

     

    Migration to, from, and within German-speaking lands has been a dynamic force in Central European history for centuries. Exemplifying some of the most exciting recent research on historical mobility, the essays collected here reconstruct the experiences of vagrants, laborers, religious exiles, refugees, and other migrants during the last five hundred years of German history. With diverse contributions ranging from early modern martyrdom to post–Cold War commemoration efforts, this volume identifies revealing commonalities shared by different eras while also placing the German case within the broader contexts of European and global migration.

    Read Introduction: Migration in the German Lands: An Introduction

     

    SHORTLISTED FOR THE 2017 THINKING ALLOWED AWARD FOR ETHNOGRAPHY

    ENDURING UNCERTAINTY
    Deportation, Punishment and Everyday Life
    Ines Hasselberg

    Volume 17, Dislocations

    This title is available Open Access under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License and published in partnership with Knowledge Unlatched.

     

    “Overall, this is a very accessible book for those who have little experience or knowledge of the UK detention and immigration system. Rich ethnographic material is interwoven effectively with relevant theory, while the findings are both timely and in need of application.” · The Howard Journal of Crime and Justice

    Focusing on the lived experience of immigration policy and processes, this volume provides fascinating insights into the deportation process as it is felt and understood by those subjected to it. The author presents a rich and innovative ethnography of deportation and deportability experienced by migrants convicted of criminal offenses in England and Wales. The unique perspectives developed here – on due process in immigration appeals, migrant surveillance and control, social relations and sense of self, and compliance and resistance – are important for broader understandings of border control policy and human rights.

     

    Resource Politics, Migration, and Climate Change
    Edited by Robert Orttung

    Volume 2, Studies in the Circumpolar North

     

    Urban areas in Arctic Russia are experiencing unprecedented social and ecological change. This collection outlines the key challenges that city managers will face in navigating this shifting political, economic, social, and environmental terrain. In particular, the volume examines how energy production drives a boom-bust cycle in the Arctic economy, explores how migrants from Muslim cultures are reshaping the social fabric of northern cities, and provides a detailed analysis of climate change and its impact on urban and industrial infrastructure.

    Read Chapter 1. Russia’s Arctic Cities: Recent Evolution and Drivers of Change

     

    Relations, Return and Belonging
    Edited by Nataša Gregorič Bon and Jaka Repič

    Volume 29, EASA Series

     

    Moving Places draws together contributions from Europe, Latin America, Asia, and Africa, exploring practices and experiences of movement, non-movement, and place-making. The book centers on “moving places”: places with locations that are not fixed but relative. Locations appearing to be reasonably stable, such as home and homeland, are in fact always subject to practices, imaginaries, and politics of movement. Bringing together original ethnographic contributions with a clear theoretical focus, this volume spans the fields of anthropology, human geography, migration, and border studies, and serves as teaching material in related programs.

    Read Introduction

     

    STAYING AT HOME
    Identities, Memories and Social Networks of Kazakhstani Germans
    Rita Sanders

    Volume 13, Integration and Conflict Studies

     

    Despite economic growth in Kazakhstan, more than 80 per cent of Kazakhstan’s ethnic Germans have emigrated to Germany to date. Disappointing experiences of the migrants, along with other aspects of life in Germany, have been transmitted through transnational networks to ethnic Germans still living in Kazakhstan. Consequently, Germans in Kazakhstan today feel more alienated than ever from their ‘historic homeland’. This book explores the interplay of those memories, social networks and state policies, which play a role in the ‘construction’ of a Kazakhstani German identity.


    Forced Migration Series

    Published in association with the Refugees Studies Centre, University of Oxford

    This series, published in association with the Refugees Studies Centre, University of Oxford, reflects the multidisciplinary nature of the field and includes within its scope international law, anthropology, sociology, politics, international relations, geopolitics, social psychology and economics.

     

    THE MYTH OF SELF-RELIANCE
    Economic Lives Inside a Liberian Refugee Camp
    Naohiko Omata

     

    For many refugees, economic survival in refugee camps is extraordinarily difficult. Drawing on both qualitative and quantitative research , this volume challenges the reputation of a ‘self-reliant’ model given to Buduburam refugee camp in Ghana and sheds light on considerable economic inequality between refugee households.By following the same refugee households over several years, The Myth of Self-Reliancealso provides valuable insights into refugees’ experiences of repatriation to Liberia after protracted exile and their responses to the ending of refugee status for remaining refugees in Ghana.

    Introduction: Buduburam: An Exemplary Refugee Camp?

     

    MIGRATION BY BOAT
    Discourses of Trauma, Exclusion and Survival
    Edited by Lynda Mannik

     

    At a time when thousands of refugees risk their lives undertaking perilous journeys by boat across the Mediterranean, this multidisciplinary volume could not be more pertinent. It offers various contemporary case studies of boat migrations undertaken by asylum seekers and refugees around the globe and shows that boats not only move people and cultural capital between places, but also fuel cultural fantasies, dreams of adventure and hope, along with fears of invasion and terrorism. The ambiguous nature of memories, media representations and popular culture productions are highlighted throughout in order to address negative stereotypes and conversely, humanize the individuals involved.

    Read Introduction

     

    FINALIST FOR THE AFRICAN STUDIES ASSOCIATION 2016 BETHWELL A. OGOT BOOK PRIZE

    MAKING UBUMWE
    Power, State and Camps in Rwanda’s Unity-Building Project
    Andrea Purdeková

     

    Since the end of the Rwandan genocide, the new political elite has been challenged with building a unified nation. Reaching beyond the better-studied topics of post-conflict justice and memory, the book investigates the project of civic education, the upsurge of state-led neo-traditional institutions and activities, and the use of camps and retreats shape the “ideal” Rwandan citizen. Rwanda’s ingando camps offer unique insights into the uses of dislocation and liminality in an attempt to anchor identities and desired political roles, to practically orient and symbolically place individuals in the new Rwandan order, and, ultimately, to create additional platforms for the reproduction of political power itself.

    Read PART I: INTRODUCTION


    New in Paperback

     

    CAPRICIOUS BORDERS
    Minority, Population, and Counter-Conduct Between Greece and Turkey
    Olga Demetriou

     

    “Olga Demetriou offers a fascinating examination of borders and border politics in Western Thrace, a politically significant and historically complex border region in Northern Greece… Through beautifully written ethnographic passages and careful analysis, Demetriou offers a sophisticated examination of how difference is experienced, made, managed, and deployed in everyday moments by communities and individuals, with and against state minoritization practices and strategies… [It] is immensely interesting and insightful.” · PoLAR: Political and Legal Anthropology Review

    This study explores the mechanisms employed at the interstices of two opposing views on the presence of minority populations in western Thrace: the legalization of their status as établis (established) and the failure to incorporate the minority in the Greek national imaginary. Revealing the logic of government bureaucracy shows how they replicate difference from the inter-state level to the communal and the personal.

     

    Immigrant Transnational Organizations in Four Continents
    Edited by Alejandro Portes and Patricia Fernández-Kelly

     

    “…an insightful volume that makes a significant contribution to the scholarly field on transnationalism with a particular reference to the migration-development-integration nexus. I would recommend this volume to anyone interested in organisational transnationalism, homeland development and integration.” · Nordic Journal of Migration Research

    Whereas most of the literature on migration focuses on individuals and their families, this book studies the organizations created by immigrants to protect themselves in their receiving states. Comparing eighteen of these grassroots organizations formed across the world, from India to Colombia to Vietnam to the Congo, researchers from the United States, Belgium, France, the Netherlands, and Spain focus their studies on the internal structure and activities of these organizations as they relate to developmental initiatives. The book outlines the principal positions in the migration and development debate and discusses the concept of transnationalism as a means of resolving these controversies.

    Read Introduction: Immigration, Transnationalism, and Development: The State of the Question


    Berghahn Journals: 

     

    Advances in Research

    Publishing peer-reviewed articles by international scholars, Conflict and Society expands the field of conflict studies by using ethnographic inquiry to establish new fields of research and interdisciplinary collaboration. An opening special section presents general articles devoted to a topic or region followed by a section featuring conceptual debates on key problems in the study of organized violence.

    Featured Article:
    Managing Danger in Fieldwork with Perpetrators of Political Violence and State Terror
    Jeffrey A. Sluka

     

    Focaal
    Journal of Global and Historical Anthropology

    Focaal is a peer-reviewed journal advocating an approach that rests in the simultaneity of ethnography, processual analysis, local insights, and global vision. It is at the heart of debates on the ongoing conjunction of anthropology and history as well as the incorporation of local research settings in the wider spatial networks of coercion, imagination, and exchange that are often glossed as “globalization” or “empire.”

    Featured Article:
    From individual grief to a shared history of the Bosnian war: Voice, audience, and the political in psychotherapeutic practices with refugees
    Laura Huttunen

    Focaalblog
    FocaalBlog is associated with Focaal: Journal of Global and Historical Anthropology. It aims to accelerate and intensify anthropological conversations beyond what a regular academic journal can do, and to make them more widely, globally, and swiftly available. Follow us on Twitter!

     

    Regions and Cohesion

    Regions and Cohesion is a needed platform for academics and practitioners alike to disseminate both empirical research and normative analysis of topics related to human and environmental security, social cohesion, and governance. It covers themes, such as the management of strategic resources, environment and society, social risk and marginalization, disasters and policy responses, violence, war and urban security, the quality of democracy, development, public health, immigration, human rights, organized crime, and cross-border human security.

    Featured Article:
    Migración, inseguridad y vulnerabilidad en el corredor del Golfo de México
    Rosío Córdova and Hipólito Rodríguez

     
     
    COMING SOON!
     

    Migration and Society

    Migration and Society is an interdisciplinary peer-reviewed journal advancing debate about emergent trends in all types of migration. We invite work that situates migration in a wider historical and societal context, including attention to experiences and representations of migration, critical theoretical perspectives on migration, and the social, cultural, and legal embeddedness of migration. Global in its scope, we particularly encourage scholarship from and about the global South as well as the North.
     
     
     

  • Berghahn Journals Blog

    World Environment Day 2017

    World Environment Day is held each year on 5th June. It is one of the principal vehicles through which the United Nations (UN) stimulates worldwide awareness of the environment and enhances political attention and action. For more information please visit worldenvironmentday.global.

     

    Berghahn is pleased to showcase new and forthcoming titles on our Environmental Studies list, and we are delighted to offer a 25% discount on all Environmental Studies titles, valid through July 5th, 2017. At checkout, simply enter the code WED17.


     

    The Greenpeace Anti-Whaling Campaign in Norway
    Juliane Riese

    Volume 21, Protest, Culture & Society

     

    In the popular imagination, no issue has been more closely linked with the environmental group Greenpeace than whaling. Opposition to commercial whaling has inspired many of the organization’s most dramatic and high-profile “direct actions”—as well as some of its most notable failures. This book provides an inside look at one such instance: Greenpeace’s decades-long campaign against the Norwegian whaling industry. Combining historical narrative with systems-theory analysis, author Juliane Riese shows how the organization’s self-presentation as a David pitted against whale-butchering Goliaths was turned on its head. She recounts how opponents successfully discredited the campaign while Greenpeace struggled with internal disagreements and other organizational challenges, providing valuable lessons for other protest movements.

    Read Introduction: Observing Greenpeace through the Systems-theoretic Lens

     

    Ecotourism, Local Knowledge, and Nature Therapies in Okinawa
    Andrea E. Murray

    Volume 40, New Directions in Anthropology

     

    The economic imperative of sustainable tourism development frequently shapes life on small subtropical islands. In Okinawa, ecotourism promises to provide employment for a dwindling population of rural youth while preserving the natural environment and bolstering regional pride. Footprints in Paradise explores the transformation in community and sense of place as Okinawans come to view themselves through the lens of the visiting tourist consumer, and as their language, landscapes, and wildlife are reconstituted as treasured and vulnerable resources. The rediscovery and revaluing of local ecological knowledge strengthens Okinawan or Uchinaa cultural heritage, despite the controversial presence of US military bases amidst a hegemonic Japanese state.

     

    A Biosocial Approach
    Edited by Catherine M. Hill, Amanda D. Webber and Nancy E. C. Priston

    Volume 9, Studies of the Biosocial Society

     

    Conflicts about wildlife are usually portrayed and understood as resulting from the negative impacts of wildlife on human livelihoods or property. However, a greater depth of analysis reveals that many instances of human-wildlife conflict are often better understood as people-people conflict, wherein there is a clash of values between different human groups. Understanding Conflicts About Wildlife unites academics and practitioners from across the globe to develop a holistic view of these interactions. It considers the political and social dimensions of ‘human-wildlife conflicts’ alongside effective methodological approaches, and will be of value to academics, conservationists and policy makers.

    Read Introduction: Complex Problems: Using a Biosocial Approach to Understanding Human-Wildlife Interactions

     

    A Sociological Study
    Ketil Skogen, Olve Krange, and Helene Figari

    NEW SERIES: Volume 1, Interspecies Encounters

     

    Wolf populations have recently made a comeback in Northern Europe and North America. These large carnivores can cause predictable conflicts by preying on livestock, and competing with hunters for game. But their arrivals often become deeply embedded in more general societal tensions, which arise alongside processes of social change that put considerable pressure on rural communities and on the rural working class in particular. Based on research and case studies conducted in Norway, Wolf Conflicts discusses various aspects of this complex picture, including conflicts over land use and conservation, and more general patterns of hegemony and resistance in modern societies.

    Read Introduction

     

    Development Paradoxes, Belonging and Participation of the Baka in East Cameroon
    Glory M. Lueong

     

    Development interventions often generate contradictions around questions of who benefits from development and which communities are targeted for intervention. This book examines how the Baka, who live in Eastern Cameroon, assert forms of belonging in order to participate in development interventions, and how community life is shaped and reshaped through these interventions. Often referred to as ‘forest people’, the Baka have witnessed many recent development interventions that include competing and contradictory policies such as ‘civilize’, assimilate and integrate the Baka into ‘full citizenship’, conserve the forest and wildlife resources, and preserve indigenous cultures at the verge of extinction.

    Read Introduction

     

    CONTEXTUALIZING DISASTER
    Edited by Gregory V. Button and Mark Schuller

    NEW SERIES: Volume 1, Catastrophes in Context

     

    “This book presents a vivid picture of extreme events and how different parties involved in the recovery process contextualize them.” · Arthur D. Murphy, University of North Carolina at Greensboro

    Contextualizing Disaster offers a comparative analysis of six recent ‘highly visible’ disasters and several slow-burning, ‘hidden’, crises that include typhoons, tsunamis, earthquakes, chemical spills and the unfolding consequences of rising seas and climate change. The book argues that, while disasters are increasingly represented by the media as unique, exceptional, newsworthy events, it is a mistake to think of disasters as isolated or discrete occurrences. Rather, building on insights developed by political ecologists, this book makes a compelling argument for understanding disasters as transnational and global phenomenon.

    Read Introduction


    Environment in History: International Perspectives Series

    Published in association with the European Society for Environmental History (ESEH), and the Rachel Carson Center (RCC)

    The relationship between human society and the natural world is being studied with increased urgency and interest. Investigating this relationship from historical, cultural, and political perspectives, the monographs and collected volumes in this series showcase high-quality research in environmental history and cognate disciplines in the social and natural sciences. The series strives to bridge both national and disciplinary divides, with a particular emphasis on European, transnational, and comparative research.

     

    INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS AND ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION
    Conservation and Globalization in the Twentieth Century
    Edited by Wolfram Kaiser and Jan-Henrik Meyer

     

    Pollution, resource depletion, habitat management, and climate change are all issues that necessarily transcend national boundaries. Accordingly, they and other environmental concerns have been a particular focus for international organizations from before the First World War to the present day. This volume is the first to comprehensively explore the environmental activities of professional communities, NGOs, regional bodies, the United Nations, and other international organizations during the twentieth century. It follows their efforts to shape debates about environmental degradation, develop binding intergovernmental commitments, and—following the seminal 1972 Conference on the Human Environment—implement and enforce actual international policies.

    Read Introduction: International Organizations and Environmental Protection in the Global Twentieth Century

     

    IN THE NAME OF THE GREAT WORK
    Stalin’s Plan for the Transformation of Nature and its Impact in Eastern Europe
    Edited by Doubravka Olšáková

     

    Beginning in 1948, the Soviet Union launched a series of wildly ambitious projects to implement Joseph Stalin’s vision of a total “transformation of nature.” Intended to increase agricultural yields dramatically, this utopian impulse quickly spread to the newly communist states of Eastern Europe, captivating political elites and war-fatigued publics alike. By the time of Stalin’s death, however, these attempts at “transformation”—which relied upon ideologically corrupted and pseudoscientific theories—had proven a spectacular failure. This richly detailed volume follows the history of such projects in three communist states—Poland, Hungary, and Czechoslovakia—and explores their varied, but largely disastrous, consequences.

    Read Introduction: The Stalin Plan for the Transformation of Nature and the East European Experience

     

    THE NATURE OF GERMAN IMPERIALISM
    Conservation and the Politics of Wildlife in Colonial East Africa
    Bernhard Gissibl

     

    “Upon completion of this book the reader easily captures the importance and complexities of conservation and wildlife policies in German East Africa. This has much to do with Gissibl’s adept ability to tell layered and contextualized stories that ground themselves in the existing scholarship… Along the way the author also continually challenges widespread colonial myths by bringing in local African voices… Gissibl employs an impressively wide array of methodological tools as he helps bring the German colonial empire into a rather Anglophile environmental historiography.” · Environmental History

    Read Introduction: Doorsteps in Paradise


    Environmental Anthropology and Ethnobiology Series

    Interest in environmental anthropology and ethnobiological knowledge has grown steadily in recent years, reflecting national and international concern about the environment and developing research priorities. `Studies in Environmental Anthropology and Ethnobiology’ is an international series based at the University of Kent at Canterbury. It is a vehicle for publishing up-to-date monographs and edited works on particular issues, themes, places or peoples which focus on the interrelationship between society, culture and the environment.

     

    INDIGENEITY AND THE SACRED
    Indigenous Revival and the Conservation of Sacred Natural Sites in the Americas
    Edited by Fausto Sarmiento and Sarah Hitchner

     

    This book presents current research in the political ecology of indigenous revival and its role in nature conservation in critical areas in the Americas. An important contribution to evolving studies on conservation of sacred natural sites (SNS), the book elucidates the complexity of development scenarios within cultural landscapes related to the appropriation of religion, environmental change in indigenous territories, and new conservation management approaches. Indigeneity and the Sacred explores how these struggles for land, rights, and political power are embedded within physical landscapes, and how indigenous identity is reconstituted as globalizing forces simultaneously threaten and promote the notion of indigeneity.

     

    TREES, KNOTS, AND OUTRIGGERS
    Environmental Knowledge in the Northeast Kula Ring
    Frederick H. Damon

     

    Trees, Knots and Outriggers (Kaynen Muyuw) is the culmination of twenty-five years of work by Frederick H. Damon and his attention to cultural adaptations to the environment in Melanesia. Damon details the intricacies of indigenous knowledge and practice in his sweeping synthesis of symbolic and structuralist anthropology with recent developments in historical ecology. This book is a long conversation between the author’s many Papua New Guinea informants, teachers and friends, and scientists in Australia, Europe and the United States, in which a spirit of adventure and discovery is palpable.

    This book is accompanied by a large online repository of images: https://pages.shanti.virginia.edu/Trees_Knots__Outriggers/

    Read Introduction

     

    BEYOND THE LENS OF CONSERVATION
    Malagasy and Swiss Imaginations of One Another
    Eva Keller

     

    “This book will make a great addition to undergraduate courses on Anthropology of the Environment and/or Development or Political Ecology. Keller’s highly readable style, in turn, will satisfy both those new to the subject and scholars already familiar with the topics of conservation practice in Madagascar. It could even become an important resource for those conservation experts who are trying – and (as the study shows) failing – to establish connections between distant places and people.” · Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute

    The study investigates how the Malagasy farmers living at the edge of the park perceive the conservation enterprise and what people in Switzerland see when looking towards Madagascar through the lens of the zoo exhibit. It crystallizes that the stories told in either place have almost nothing in common: one focuses on power and history, the other on morality and progress. Thus, instead of building a bridge, Nature conservation widens the gap between people in the North and the South.

    Read Introduction

     

    SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT
    An Appraisal from the Gulf Region
    Edited by Paul Sillitoe

     

    This volume gives a wide ranging introduction focusing on the arid Gulf region, where the challenges of sustainable development are starkly evident. The Gulf relies on non-renewable oil and gas exports to supply the world’s insatiable CO2 emitting energy demands, and has built unsustainable conurbations with water supplies dependent on energy hungry desalination plants and deep aquifers pumped beyond natural replenishment rates. Sustainable Development has an interdisciplinary focus, bringing together university faculty and government personnel from the Gulf, Europe, and North America — including social and natural scientists, environmentalists and economists, architects and planners — to discuss topics such as sustainable natural resource use and urbanization, industrial and technological development, economy and politics, history and geography.

    Read Introduction: Sustainable Development in the Gulf: Some Introductory Remarks


    NEW IN PAPERBACK

     

    Cases of Local Activism and Environmental Innovation around the World
    Edited by Carol Hager and Mary Alice Haddad

     

    NIMBY (Not In My Back Yard) protests are often criticized as parochial and short-lived, generating no lasting influence on broader processes related to environmental politics. This volume offers a different perspective. Drawing on cases from around the globe, it demonstrates that NIMBY protests, although always arising from a local concern in a particular community, often result in broader political, social, and technological change. Chapters include cases from Europe, North America, and Asia, engaging with the full political spectrum from established democracies to non-democratic countries. Regardless of political setting, NIMBY movements can have a positive and proactive role in generating innovative solutions to local as well as transnational environmental issues. Furthermore, those solutions are now serving as models for communities and countries around the world.

    Read Introduction: A New Look at NIMBY

     

    WATERWORLDS
    Anthropology in Fluid Environments
    Edited by Kirsten Hastrup and Frida Hastrup

    Volume 3, Ethnography, Theory, Experiment

     

    In one form or another, water participates in the making and unmaking of people’s lives, practices, and stories. Contributors’ detailed ethnographic work analyzes the union and mutual shaping of water and social lives. This volume discusses current ecological disturbances and engages in a world where unbounded relationalities and unsettled frames of orientation mark the lives of all, anthropologists included. Water emerges as a fluid object in more senses than one, challenging anthropologists to foreground the mutable character of their objects of study and to responsibly engage with the generative role of cultural analysis.

    Read Introduction: Waterworlds at Large


    OF RELATED INTEREST FROM BERGHAHN JOURNALS:

     

    Advances in Research

     

    Environment and Society publishes critical reviews of the latest research literature on environmental studies, including subjects of theoretical, methodological, substantive, and applied significance. Articles also survey the literature regionally and thematically and reflect the work of anthropologists, geographers, environmental scientists, and human ecologists from all parts of the world in order to internationalize the conversations within environmental anthropology, environmental geography, and other environmentally oriented social sciences. The publication will appeal to academic, research, and policy-making audiences alike.

    Be sure to check out EnviroSociety, a multimedia site that provides insights into contemporary socio-ecological issues with posts from top scholars in the social sciences that engage readers interested in current environmental topics. Follow on Twitter!

     

     

    Nature and Culture (NC) is a forum for the international community of scholars and practitioners to present, discuss, and evaluate critical issues and themes related to the historical and contemporary relationships that societies, civilizations, empires, regions, nation-states have with Nature. The journal contains a serious interpolation of theory, methodology, criticism, and concrete observation forming the basis of this discussion.

    The mission of the journal is to move beyond specialized disciplinary enclaves and mind-sets toward broader syntheses that encompass time, space and structures in understanding the Nature-Culture relationship. The Journal furthermore provides an outlet for the identification of knowledge gaps in our understanding of this relationship.

     

    Regiones y Cohesión / Régions et Cohésion

     

    The journal of the Consortium for Comparative Research on Regional Integration and Social Cohesion (RISC), a cross-regional, interdisciplinary, and multi-lingual network of socially conscious and prestigious research institutes in Europe, North America, South America, Africa, and Asia.

    Due to the dramatic changes in global affairs related to regional integration, studies can no longer be limited to the analysis of economic competitiveness and political power in global geopolitics. Regions and Cohesion is a needed platform for academics and practitioners alike to disseminate both empirical research and normative analysis of topics related to human and environmental security, social cohesion, and governance. It covers themes, such as the management of strategic resources, environment and society, social risk and marginalization, disasters and policy responses, violence, war and urban security, the quality of democracy, development, public health, immigration, human rights, organized crime, and cross-border human security.

    Interdisciplinary in nature and multi-lingual in character (English, French, Spanish), the journal promotes the comparative examination of the human and environmental impacts of various aspects of regional integration across geographic areas, time periods, and policy arenas.

     

     

  • Berghahn Journals Blog

    The Berkshire Conference of Women Historians

     

    If you are unable to attend, we would like to provide you with a special discount offer. For the next 30 days, receive a 25% discount on all Gender Studies titles found on our website. At checkout, simply enter the discount code Berks17. Visit our website­ to browse our newly published interactive online Spring/Summer 2017 New Titles Catalog or use the new enhanced subject searching features­ for a complete listing of all published and forthcoming titles.


    Here is a preview of some of our newest releases on display:

     

    Militant Feminisms in the Federal Republic of Germany since 1968
    Katharina Karcher

    Volume 38, Monographs in German History

     

    Few figures in modern German history are as central to the public memory of radical protest than Ulrike Meinhof, but she was only the most prominent of the countless German women—and militant male feminists—who supported and joined in revolutionary actions from the 1960s onward. Sisters in Arms gives a bracing account of how feminist ideas were enacted by West German leftist organizations from the infamous Red Army Faction to less well-known groups such as the Red Zora. It analyzes their confrontational and violent tactics in challenging the abortion ban, opposing violence against women, and campaigning for solidarity with Third World women workers. Though these groups often diverged ideologically and tactically, they all demonstrated the potency of militant feminism within postwar protest movements.

    Read Introduction

     

    HONOUR AND VIOLENCE
    Gender, Power and Law in Southern Pakistan
    Nafisa Shah

    Volume 39, New Directions in Anthropology

     

    “This is an extremely impressive achievement that makes a significant and substantial contribution to the ethnography of Pakistan and to the broader field of legal anthropology.” · Hastings Donnan, Queen’s University of Belfast

    The practice of karo kari allows family, especially fathers, brothers and sons, to take the lives of their daughters, sisters and mothers if they are accused of adultery. This volume examines the central position of karo kari in the social, political and juridical structures in Upper Sindh, Pakistan. Drawing connections between local contests over marriage and resources, Nafisa Shah unearths deep historical processes and power relations. In particular, she explores how the state justice system and informal mediations inform each other in state responses to karo kari, and how modern law is implicated in this seemingly ancient cultural practice.

    Read Introduction: Honour Violence, Law and Power in Upper Sindh

     

    GIRLHOOD AND THE POLITICS OF PLACE
    Edited by Claudia Mitchell and Carrie Rentschler

     

    “Comprised of eighteen erudite, informative, and insightful articles by experts in their field, Girlhood and the Politics of Place is enhanced with the further inclusion of an illuminating Introduction… an Epilogue, numerous figures and a table… and a twenty-one page Index. Presenting a body of seminal and original scholarship, [this volume] is an extraordinary study and highly recommended for both college and university library collections.” · Midwest Book Review

    Examining context-specific conditions in which girls live, learn, work, play, and organize deepens the understanding of place-making practices of girls and young women worldwide. Focusing on place across health, literary and historical studies, art history, communications, media studies, sociology, and education allows for investigations of how girlhood is positioned in relation to interdisciplinary and transnational research methodologies, media environments, geographic locations, history, and social spaces. This book offers a comprehensive reading on how girlhood scholars construct and deploy research frameworks that directly engage girls in the research process.

    Available open access under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0).

    This edition is supported by Knowledge Unlatched. Full text

     

    Autobiographical and Biographical Experiences
    Edited by Shirley Ardener, Fiona Armitage-Woodward, and Lidia Dina Sciama

     

    Drawing on family materials, historical records, and eyewitness accounts, this book shows the impact of war on individual women caught up in diverse and often treacherous situations. It relates stories of partisans in Holland, an Italian woman carrying guns and provisions in the face of hostile soldiers, and Kikuyu women involved in the Mau Mau insurrection in Kenya. A woman displaced from Silesia recalls fleeing with children across war-torn Germany, and women caught up in conflicts in Burma and in Rwanda share their tales. War’s aftermath can be traumatic, as shown by journalists in Libya and by a midwife on the Cambodian border who helps refugees to give birth and regain hope. Finally, British women on active service in Afghanistan and at NATO headquarters also speak.

    Read Introduction: Women’s Autobiographical and Biographical Experiences of War across Continents: An Introduction

     

    Youthful Reinvention of Ukraine’s Cultural Paradigm
    Edited and Translated by Marian J. Rubchak
    Foreword Martha Kichorowska Kebalo

     

    “…a complex and well‐researched volume that raises critical questions about the nature of contemporary cultural and political shifts in Ukraine and offers some worthy fresh ideas and views. The book might be of interest to different groups of readers, ranging from those from within Ukraine, who might want to look at themselves through the looking glass, to scholars and journalists who have a professional interest in the country or are just seeking a short but thorough summary of the local cultural and political landscapes.” · Journal of Soviet & Post-Soviet Politics & Society

    Having been spared the constraints imposed on intellectual discourse by the totalitarian regime of the past, young Ukrainian scholars now engage with many Western ideological theories and practices in an atmosphere of intellectual freedom and uncensored scholarship. Displacing the Soviet legacy of prescribed thought and practices, this volume’s female contributors have infused their work with Western elements, although vestiges of Soviet-style ideas, research methodology, and writing linger. The result is the articulation of a “New Imaginaries” — neither Soviet nor Western — that offers a unique approach to the study of gender by presenting a portrait of Ukrainian society as seen through the eyes of a new generation of feminist scholars.

    Read Introduction

     

    Networks, Biographies, Gender Orders
    Edited by Oliver Janz and Daniel Schönpflug

     

    “This rich and varied collection of essays, tied together by the editors’ clear explanatory rationale, provides much evidence to support Janz’s and Schonpflug’s claim that a transnational perspective opens new lines of inquiry and insights for historians of international women’s and gender history.” · Women & Social Movements in the US

    Recent debates have used the concept of “transnational history” to broaden research on historical subjects that transcend national boundaries and encourage a shift away from official inter-state interactions to institutions, groups, and actors that have been obscured. This approach proves particularly fruitful for the dynamic field of global gender and women’s history. By looking at the restless lives and work of women’s activists in informal border-crossings, ephemeral NGOs, the lower management of established international organizations, and other global networks, this volume reflects the potential of a new perspective that allows for a more adequate analysis of transnational activities. By pointing out cultural hierarchies, the vicissitudes of translation and re-interpretation, and the ambiguity of intercultural exchange, this volume demonstrates the critical potential of transnational history. It allows us to see the limits of universalist and cosmopolitan claims so dear to many historical actors and historians.

     

    A Gendered Perspective on Ottoman Urban History
    Edited by Nazan Maksudyan

     

    “An impressive work of seminal scholarship, Women and the City, Women in the City: A Gendered Perspective of Ottoman Urban History is a compendium of seven original articles… Enhanced with the inclusion of two pages of notes on contributors; an eighteen page bibliography; and a twenty-one page index, Women and the City, Women in the City is an especially recommended addition to academic library Women’s Studies, Turkish Cultural History, and Ottoman History reference collections and supplemental studies reading lists.” · Midwest Book Review

    An attempt to reveal, recover and reconsider the roles, positions, and actions of Ottoman women, this volume reconsiders the negotiations, alliances, and agency of women in asserting themselves in the public domain in late- and post-Ottoman cities. Drawing on diverse theoretical backgrounds and a variety of source materials, from court records to memoirs to interviews, the contributors to the volume reconstruct the lives of these women within the urban sphere. With a fairly wide geographical span, from Aleppo to Sofia, from Jeddah to Istanbul, the chapters offer a wide panorama of the Ottoman urban geography, with a specific concern for gender roles.

     

    Women, Migration, and the Diaspora
    Edited by Haci Akman

     

    Gender has a profound impact on the discourse on migration as well as various aspects of integration, social and political life, public debate, and art. This volume focuses on immigration and the concept of diaspora through the experiences of women living in Norway, Sweden, and Denmark. Through a variety of case studies, the authors approach the multifaceted nature of interactions between these women and their adopted countries, considering both the local and the global. The text examines the “making of the Scandinavian” and the novel ways in which diasporic communities create gendered forms of belonging that transcend the nation state.

     

    NIGHTTIME BREASTFEEDING
    An American Cultural Dilemma
    Cecília Tomori

    Volume 26, Fertility, Reproduction and Sexuality: Social and Cultural Perspectives

     

    “Tomori’s research reveals that these two fields—breastfeeding and sleep—are intricately intertwined not only in practice but also theoretically through analysis that exposes the contradictions inherent in the cultural norms governing these intimate embodied experiences.” · Anthropologica

    Nighttime for many new parents in the United States is fraught with the intense challenges of learning to breastfeed and helping their babies sleep so they can get rest themselves. Through careful ethnographic study of the dilemmas raised by nighttime breastfeeding, and their examination in the context of anthropological, historical, and feminist studies, this volume unravels the cultural tensions that underlie these difficulties. As parents negotiate these dilemmas, they not only confront conflicting medical guidelines about breastfeeding and solitary infant sleep, but also larger questions about cultural and moral expectations for children and parents, and their relationship with one another.

    Read Introduction

     

    THE SURPLUS WOMAN
    Unmarried in Imperial Germany, 1871-1918
    Catherine L. Dollard

    Volume 30, Monographs in German History

     

    “Dollard’s work makes important contributions to German cultural history, social history, and gender history, focusing attention on the construction of the stereotype of single women as abnormal, a problem to be solved, in Imperial Germany, and the way that the German women’s movement co-opted this icon for its own purposes of reform. She also brings to attention several lesser-known German female activists who have often been overlooked.” · German Studies Review

    The first German women’s movement embraced the belief in a demographic surplus of unwed women, known as the Frauenüberschuß, as a central leitmotif in the campaign for reform. Proponents of the female surplus held that the advances of industry and urbanization had upset traditional marriage patterns and left too many bourgeois women without a husband. This book explores the ways in which the realms of literature, sexology, demography, socialism, and female activism addressed the perceived plight of unwed women. Case studies of reformers, including Lily Braun, Ruth Bré, Elisabeth Gnauck-Kühne, Helene Lange, Alice Salomon, Helene Stöcker, and Clara Zetkin, demonstrate the expansive influence of the discourse surrounding a female surfeit. By combining the approaches of cultural, social, and gender history, The Surplus Woman provides the first sustained analysis of the ways in which imperial Germans conceptualized anxiety about female marital status as both a product and a reflection of changing times.


    Forthcoming

    THE WOMEN’S LIBERATION MOVEMENT
    Impacts and Outcomes
    Edited by Kristina Schulz

    Volume 22, Protest, Culture & Society

     

    For over half a century, the countless organizations and initiatives that comprise the Women’s Liberation movement have helped to reshape many aspects of Western societies, from public institutions and cultural production to body politics and subsequent activist movements. This collection represents the first systematic investigation of WLM’s cumulative impacts and achievements within the West. Here, specialists on movements in Europe systematically investigate outcomes in different countries in the light of a reflective social movement theory, comparing them both implicitly and explicitly to developments in other parts of the world.

     

    Feminism and Generational Conflict in Recent German Literature and Film
    Margaret McCarthy

     

    The last two decades have been transformational, often discordant ones for German feminism, as a new cohort of activists has come of age and challenged many of the movement’s strategic and philosophical orthodoxies. Mad Mädchen offers an incisive analysis of these trans-generational debates, identifying the mother-daughter themes and other tropes that have defined their representation in German literature, film, and media. Author Margaret McCarthy investigates female subjectivity as it processes political discourse to define itself through both differences and affinities among women. Ultimately, such a model suggests new ways of re-imagining feminist solidarity across generational, ethnic, and racial lines.

     

    Negotiating Infant Feeding
    Penny Van Esterik and Richard A. O’Connor

    Volume 6, Food, Nutrition, and Culture

     

    Breastfeeding and child feeding at the center of nurturing practices, yet the work of nurture has escaped the scrutiny of medical and social scientists. Anthropology offers a powerful biocultural approach that examines how custom and culture interact to support nurturing practices. Our framework shows how the unique constitutions of mothers and infants regulate each other. The Dance of Nurture integrates ethnography, biology and the political economy of infant feeding into a holistic framework guided by the metaphor of dance. It includes a critique of efforts to improve infant feeding practices globally by UN agencies and advocacy groups concerned with solving global nutrition and health problems.


    Berghahn Journals

     

    The International Yearbook of Central, Eastern, and Southeastern European Women’s and Gender History

     

    Aspasia aims to transform European women’s and gender history by expanding comparative research on women and gender to all parts of Europe, creating a European history of women and gender that encompasses more than the traditional Western European perspective.

     

     

    An Interdisciplinary Journal

    Girlhood Studies is a peer-reviewed journal providing a forum for the critical discussion of girlhood from a variety of disciplinary perspectives, and for the dissemination of current research and reflections on girls’ lives to a broad, cross-disciplinary audience of scholars, researchers, practitioners in the fields of education, social service and health care and policy makers. International and interdisciplinary in scope, it is committed to feminist, anti-discrimination, anti-oppression approaches and solicits manuscripts from a variety of disciplines.

     

     

    Special Issue: Women, Gender, and Law: Essays from the Gender and Medieval Studies Conference and the Mid-America Medieval Association in Honor of the Late Shona Kelly Wray

     

    Historical Reflections/Réflexions Historiques (HRRH) has established a well-deserved reputation for publishing high quality articles of wide-ranging interest for over forty years. The journal, which publishes articles in both English and French, is committed to exploring history in an interdisciplinary framework and with a comparative focus. Historical approaches to art, literature, and the social sciences; the history of mentalities and intellectual movements; the terrain where religion and history meet: these are the subjects to which Historical Reflections/Réflexions Historiques is devoted.

Top Article Downloads


  1. Under the Shadow of Empire: Indigenous Girls' Presencing as Decolonizing Force
    Girlhood Studies, vol. 7, #1, Summer 2014
  2. Forget Dawkins: Notes toward an Ethnography of Religious Belief and Doubt
    Social Analysis, vol. 59, #2, Summer 2015
  3. Blaming Sexualization for Sexting
    Girlhood Studies, vol. 7, #1, Summer 2014
  4. Out of the Closet? German Patriotism and Soccer Mania
    German Politics & Society, vol.24, #3, Autumn 2006
  5. Rape Culture and the Feminist Politics of Social Media
    Girlhood Studies, vol. 7, #1, Summer 2014
  6. Less Than One But More Than Many: Anthropocene as Science Fiction and Scholarship-in-the-Making
    Environment and Society, vol. 6, #1, Summer 2015
  7. Staging "small, small incidents": Dissent, gender, and militarization among young people in Kashmir
    Focaal, vol. 2011, #60, Summer 2011
  8. An Inquiry into the Roots of the Modern Concept of Development
    Contributions to the History of Concepts, vol. 4, #2, Autumn 2008
  9. Misunderstood, misrepresented, contested? Anthropological knowledge production in question
    Focaal, vol. 2015, #72, Summer 2015
  10. Theatres of virtue: Collaboration, consensus, and the social life of corporate social responsibility
    Focaal, vol. 2011, #60, Summer 2011

Berghahn Collections

Libraries may purchase at a special discount (with the option to purchase the backfiles in addition) the entire Berghahn collection or Berghahn journals bundled by subjects.

Berghahn Journals New Online Platform

Berghahn Journals is pleased to announce the launch of our new journals online platform starting April 1. We will be working with all subscribers to make the transition process as seamless as possible and will contact you in the coming weeks with more information about access procedures.

March 31 is the last day Berghahn will be hosting its journal content on IngentaConnect. Starting April 1, all Berghahn journal content will be hosted by PubFactory on the new Berghahn Online platform.

Berghahn Online will offer a high-performing platform with the following innovative features and services in addition to those already offered to Institutional Users

Admin Users

  • Seamless content authorization based on institutional IP address
  • Marc Records support that allows for easy download on a per subscription basis
  • More purchase options for custom journal collections
  • Customization to include institutional branding, including library name, logo and URL
  • Continuous access to up-to-date COUNTER reports and SUSHI support

End-Users

  • Mobile optimized responsive site design
  • Increased content discoverability through OAI-PMH support
  • Improved search results
  • User-defined personalization including saved searches, bookmarking, and annotation

Please find more information, including FAQ, here

Journals Catalogs



Get Email Updates

Recent Blog Articles

World Refugee Day 2017

The United Nations’ (UN) World Refugee Day is observed on June 20 each year. This event draws public’s attention to the millions of refugees and internally displaced persons worldwide who have been forced to flee their homes due to war, conflict and persecution. For more information please visit www.un.org.   In marking this year’s observance, […]

European Judaism at 50

This issue marks the beginning of the fifty-first year of publication of the journal, something to be registered with a degree of pride and not a little wonder. We have been served over this time with a remarkable series of editors, beginning with our founding editor Rabbi Dr Ignaz Maybaum z’l (1897-1976). In those early […]

Berghahn Journals: New Issues Published in May

Boyhood Studies An Interdisciplinary Journal Volume 10, Issue 1 With the theme of “Male Youth Sports: Changing Contexts and Emergent Perspectives,” this special issue presents contributions about boys in global sports contexts from fields as diverse as the history of sport, sport sociology, and sport psychology.

Environmental Storytelling

The following is an excerpt from Stories Make the World: Reflections on Storytelling and the Art of the Documentary by Stephen Most.

World Environment Day 2017

World Environment Day is held each year on 5th June. It is one of the principal vehicles through which the United Nations (UN) stimulates worldwide awareness of the environment and enhances political attention and action. For more information please visit worldenvironmentday.global.   Berghahn is pleased to showcase new and forthcoming titles on our Environmental Studies […]