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  • EnviroSociety

    Present Progressive?: Of Cell Phones and Energy Transitions in the Anthropocene

    The first week of September was a rather busy one, beginning with the announcement by the Subcomission on Quaternary Stratigraphy’s Working Group on the Anthropocene (AWG), reporting their vote for the onset of the Anthropocene Epoch. In their report to the International Union of Geological Sciences (IUGS), the Working Group favored the nuclear fallout of 1950s as a defining moment, though only one of several candidates that must still be considered before the designation of type location for the Anthropocene’s golden spike. A “golden spike” is a physical marker for the lower boundary of a geologic period, as defined by a Global Boundary Stratotype Section and Point (GSSP), which must be specified by a unit of the International Commission on Stratigraphy. So, the AWG must decide what signal demonstrates most clearly and continuously the reality of anthropogenic dominance on the geologic processes of the planet. Most often, this is done by designation of a type fossil; in the case of the Anthropocene, a leading candidate is the domestic chicken. Just think about that one: dinosaurs have literally come home to roost…

    That was on Sunday, 4 September. On Tuesday, the first day of classes for Environmental Anthropology, 30 students from 16 different majors leapt into a debate about nature and culture, hubris and responsibility, and the colonization of nature. Then, on cue, two days later hurricane Hermine swept through the neighborhoods of friends and relations in Florida, leaving us all with questions about what it means to be a hurricane in the Anthropocene, with rising tides and post-tropical cyclones that demonstrated some of the caprice that accompanies a changing climate. With Hermine, the questions of if and how climate change can be seen as a driver for specific weather events were raised once again. For me, the shifting sands of both humanity’s physical relationships with other parts of the planet and the ethics and politics of choosing our actions (for no action is still a choice) regarding those relationships came into focus through these examples. We have left our marks on this planet and its atmosphere in many ways, and whether through a sense of hubris, guilt, responsibility, or necessity, we will make choices in the coming decades that will determine the direction and extent of those marks, however defined.

    In the middle of all this upheaval that evoked the mix of geologic and human timescales of the Anthropocene, I spent two hours at the cell phone store on a sadly necessary but dreaded task—transplanting the brain of my old phone into a new one.[1] As the electrons coursed from one device to the next, I tried to use the dead time to focus on my assigned reading for the next class session—Laura Ogden’s excellent book, Swamplife, which details the complex relationships between people and other living beings in the water world that is the Everglades. The cover caught the attention of the salesman, and he asked about it. Our conversation leapt from the Everglades, Florida, and hurricane Hermine to his single undergraduate class in anthropology, which had left him with a passion for archaeology that he had felt could not be congruent with his desire for a family and a stable job. I suggested that if he still had an interest, our department was always happy to have volunteers and he could perhaps take a week in the summer to follow his dream. We talked on and on, first about the “control of nature” in our national parks and elsewhere, then about climate change and the need for an energy transition. He paused thoughtfully and asked, “Can we stop it? Is it too late?” and then, “Is there any point to trying, when all of these technologies are in the future?”

    I smiled. This was another variation on a conversation I love to have, and it is especially good when it comes at a time and place that I don’t expect. I tell my students that my goal for any course is for them to take the readings home and give them to friends and family, to start conversations with neighbors and co-workers, and in general, to take the ideas and practices that have engaged them out into the wider world. This wasn’t a university course, but such a random interaction in the cell phone store offered a wonderful opportunity for me to follow my own advice. Cell phones, as icons of transnational consumer society that reflect so much of the positive and negative elements of the world we have wrought of rare Earth elements and the sands of time (well, silicon, anyway), seemed an ideal starting point for a conversation about energy transitions in the Anthropocene. The salesman asked if coal was “coming back” (a reasonable question given the number of bankruptcies among global coal companies that have severely impacted Wyoming of late), and I replied that, while it hadn’t yet “gone away” and wouldn’t for quite a while, the trend away from a carbon-intensive society was a reality in many places and that Wyoming had a wonderful set of renewable resources in our 300 days of sun each year and our ferocious winds.

    The opportunities for moving forward using presently existing technologies are wide open for those who would seize them; we do not need to wait for new inventions and more dire forecasts to start the move toward lower carbon lifestyles. The salesman was surprised. Everything he had heard about climate change was depressing and made worse by the rather scarce information available about the current realities of the energy transition underway around the globe. Solar and wind technologies have become more and more competitive over the past few years and will only continue to gain momentum in the coming decade. As new ways of combining energy sources and storage strategies develop, the ability to replace some or all of the current coal-fired electricity production capacity with lower carbon alternatives will become even more accessible and indeed desirable, making use of existing transmission capacity for new kinds of electricity production, as well as co-generation of heat and power. And these new alternatives can be integrated at different scales and in accordance with the specific attributes of particular sites, thus maximizing on the opportunities for local and regional solutions. For those with an entrepreneurial bent, there are many ways to help this essential and inevitable energy transition along. We can encourage such engagements by highlighting the existing positive stories that illuminate some of these paths (for example, “Canada’s energy transition success story”), rather than wallowing in the sadly outdated mythologies that say we must wait for the ever-distant deus ex machina that is always another 10 years away. When steam engines ruled the world, no one could imagine how they might be replaced, yet in less than 15 years, from 1946 to 1959, steam locomotive transport went from nearly 80 percent to less than 1 percent of the rail freight capacity in the United States. Technology revolutions can and frequently have taken place quickly, and like I said to my new friend in the cell phone store, it’s worth knowing which way the train is heading. As I packed up my phones and thanked him for the cell phone transplant and the opportunity to chat, he told me that his eyes were opened to new opportunities in renewables—and in archaeology.



    Sarah Strauss
    is Professor of Anthropology at the University of Wyoming. Author of Positioning Yoga (2004) and editor of Weather, Climate, Culture (2003, with Ben Orlove) and Cultures of Energy (2013, with Stephanie Rupp and Thomas Love), her research focuses on energy, climate change, water, and health issues in India, Europe, and the United States.



    Notes

    [1] And yes, I am completely aware of the social, energy, and other environmental costs of cell phones, but at this point, am still entirely subject to the systemic forces that require us to be available 24/7. In this case, our university’s budget problems are forcing the loss of departmental landlines, and forwarding from a VOIP number is obligate.



    Cite as:
    Strauss, Sarah. 2016. “Present Progressive? Of Cell Phones and Energy Transitions in the Anthropocene.” EnviroSociety, 28 September. www.envirosociety.org/2016/09/present-progressive-of-cell-phones-and-energy-transitions-in-the-anthropocene.

  • FocaalBlog

    Lesley Gill and Norbert Ross: What’s Class Got to Do with It?

    trump

    Unsettled by Donald Trump’s bigotry and xenophobia, liberal pundits have struggled to understand his improbable anointment as the nominee of the Republican party. Many have sought answers in the experience and behavior of the white-working class, the bedrock of Trump support. Why, asks the New Yorker’s James Surolecki, would any working class person support Trump. Surolecki believes that part of the answer lies in the appeal of Trump’s nativist rhetoric. For William Galston, writing in Newsweek, working class whites vote for Trump because they “seek protection against all the forces that they perceive as hostile to their way of life—foreign people, foreign goods, foreign ideas.” And wary of Trump backers and their potential for violence if the Republicans lose the presidency, Salon’s Michael Bourne locates white working class anger in “1960s-era legislation for promoting the interests of immigrants and minorities over their own, just as they blame free-trade policies of both parties for sending their jobs offshore.” According to Bourne, they are either the hapless “victims of American progress or a bunch of over privileged bigots.”

    In these accounts, poorly educated, working class whites bear outsized responsibility for the rise of Trump’s ethnonationalism. They are portrayed as retrograde parochials who channel their rage and bitterness at forces beyond their control into racist and xenophobic explanations for broken lives that the march of progress has made irrelevant. No doubt prejudice is alive and well in the United States today. Blatant racism frequently surfaces at Trump rallies, where anti-immigration speeches fuel the hatred. However, narratives that blame the individual prejudices of working class whites for the ascendance of Trump are too partial and convenient.  Not only do they miss how thirty years of anything-goes, free-market capitalism re-established the power of corporations at the expense of diverse working people, and how so much upheaval created new and aggravated old racial, national and gender inequalities among working people.  They also ignore how racism and hatred are present in the upper echelons of US society, where the well-to-do isolate themselves in gated communities, and decades of war on drugs and terror disproportionately target minorities, define them as threats, and militarize the policing of their communities.

    To be clear, white working-class Americans did not vote Trump in the primaries; white working-class Republican Americans did. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, many fewer Republicans in the ten poorest counties of the country went to the polls than Democrats, casting 5,530 votes to 13,000 for the Democrats. Although there is no doubt that Trump received the majority of the Republican vote in those counties, Bernie Sanders won more votes in the Democratic primaries than Trump did in the Republican (3554 vs. 3431 respectively), and Hillary Clinton received almost twice as many votes (9960) as all Republican candidates combined. The ten poorest counties are located in Appalachia and the South, and their residents are mostly white and poorly educated. The median household income is only $21,000 annually, less than half the national average, and only 10% of adults 25 years of age or older hold a bachelor’s degree. Yet this is only half, the story. The spotlight on white, working-class bigotry casts a shadow over the support that Trump has received from more affluent Republicans whose racial attitudes and reasons for embracing Trump receive little scrutiny.

    Even as Republicans splinter, and Trump support dwindles among the party’s established elites, who fear his disavowal of trade policies and worry about his criticism of US security commitments, it is worth remembering that substantial numbers of highly educated, well-heeled Republicans responded to his call to “make America great again.” These nationalists joined hands with white, working class partisans with whom they share a sense that the world and their place in it are changing in disturbing ways. Trump’s promise to register Muslims, build a wall along the Mexican border, and deport all undocumented immigrants, his demeaning treatment of women, a Mexican-American judge, and a disabled journalist, and his mocking of “political correctness,” speak to their collective sense of insecurity about the perceived collapse of “order” and the hierarchies that define it.

    If we look at nine of the ten wealthiest counties of the United States[1], for example, Republican voters backed Donald Trump over other contenders by a high margin. Trump clearly outperformed his main Republican opponents with an average of 45% of the votes compared to 19% and 10% for his closest rivals, Kasich and Cruz respectively. The margin of Trump support is especially high for the three wealthiest New Jersey counties (Hunterdon, Somerset and Morris), where Trump garnered an average of 76% of the ballots cast. Said differently, in three of the ten wealthiest counties of the USA, over three quarters of Republican primary voters chose Donald Trump. By and large, this pattern is not exceptional for wealthy white America.

    The ten richest counties are concentrated on the East Coast, with 5th ranked Los Alamos county, NM and 8th ranked Douglas country, CO the only exceptions. Four of the East coast counties surround Washington, D.C., where occupations in professional services and technology contracting offer lucrative incomes and major federal agencies, such as the Defense Department, employ thousands of people. Three cluster around New York City in suburban New Jersey, within easy commuting distance to Wall Street. For these counties, residents count among the most highly educated voters in the country. Sixty percent of those 25 years of age or older hold at least a bachelor’s degree. They live in households with an average income of $107,777, which is over twice as high as the nationwide average and five times higher than the median household income of the ten poorest counties. Residents are also overwhelmingly white.

    Taken together, these data demonstrate that independent of income, educational level, or region, white Republican primary voters heavily favor the candidacy of Donald Trump. This forces us to expand on the question James Surolecki asked in the New Yorker. While it is, indeed, puzzling that any working class person would support Trump, it is equally confounding why an affluent person would endorse his candidacy. Trump’s anti-labor stance, his proposed tax policy, and his own business practices are hostile to working-class interests, yet his disdain for global trade agreements and his isolationist international policies do not favor those in the upper echelons of power, either.

    Clearly, explanations that focus on working class bigotry to explain Trump’s success miss the point. One of the more likely reasons lies in their shared experiences of race, regardless of class background. The appalling racism of many Trump enthusiasts has been manifest on the Internet and at campaign rallies, despite his recent efforts to cast himself as a friend of African Americans, after one poll showed his support among them at zero. Yet Trump himself is less a noxious novelty than the product of years of right-wing revanchism and a conservative movement that, as Corey Robin argues, strives to recall “those forms of [racial, gender, and sexual] experience which can no longer be had in an authentic form.” As he packages himself in incendiary racist, sexist, and xenophobic rhetoric and stirs hopes of returning America to a time when white supremacy felt secure, Trump the billionaire purports to be the champion of ordinary people whose ragged lives are ignored by their unresponsive representatives and dismissed by uncaring elites.

    This is the same message pedaled by Nigel Farage, a leading Brexit advocate and former leader of the far-right, British UKIP party. Farage urged Britons to “take back control” of their country by voting in a recent referendum to leave the European Union. As reported in the New York Times, he subsequently addressed Trump supporters at a Mississippi rally telling them that “the message is clear, the parallels are there. There are millions of ordinary Americans who have been let down, who have had a bad time, who feel the political class in Washington is detached from them, who feel so many of their representatives are politically correct parts of that liberal media elite.” The similarities between Trump and the pro-Brexit party of Great Britain do not end there. Neither Trump nor Farage spend much time worrying about facts in their public pronouncements. Both stoke fears about crime and terrorism and conjure simplistic accounts of economic decline in which undeserving immigrants stalk white jobs at every turn.

    Pundits such as James Surolecki, William Galston, and Michael Bourne have heard Trump’s message but fail to realize that, much like Farage’s backers, Trump’s Republican stalwarts are not only found among the white working-class “ordinary folks” he calls upon in his speeches. Rather, white Republican voters across the class spectrum who fear immigrants, Muslims, and minorities, as well as the erosion of US global power and privilege, share responsibility for his rise to the top of the Republican ticket. Journalists who vilify the white working class inadvertently strengthen Trump’s hand by reinforcing hatred of media elites and confirming his claim to be on the side of the common person. Such liberal condescension, writes Connor Kilpatrick in Jacobin is “code for an anti-class agenda,” one in which “racism can be blamed but capitalism can be exonerated.

    This post was originally featured on Counterpunch on 6 September 2016.


    Lesley Gill  and Norbert Ross teach anthropology at Vanderbilt University.


    Note

    [1] We exclude Douglas county Colorado from our analysis because data are unavailable.

  • Museum Worlds

    Museum News: August 2016

    “Adam” and “Eve,” a pair of oil-on-panel paintings created by Lucas Cranach the Elder circa 1530. (Norton Simon Art Foundation)

     

    Prince’s Paisley Park to Be Turned Into Museum, via ABC News 

    Burke Museum welcomes new arrival: a T. rex skull, via The Seattle Times

    Court rules museum can keep Nazi-looted Adam and Eve masterpieces with a hidden past, via Los Angeles Times

    Michael Jordan gives $5 million to African American museum, via The Washington Post

    Industrial museum opens in former Pennsylvania steel plant, via The Seattle Times

    He Died At 32, But A Young Artist Lives On In LA’s Underground Museum, via NPR

     

  • Berghahn Journals Blog

    Visit Berghahn Booth at GSA 2016 conference

     

    We are delighted to inform you that we will be attending fortieth annual German Studies Association conference in San Diego, CA on Sept. 29-Oct. 2, 2016. Please stop by our stand to browse our latest selection of books at discounted prices & pick up some free journal samples.

    We are especially happy to invite you to join Berghahn on Friday September 30th at 5:30pm in the exhibit hall for a wine reception to be held at Berghahn booth to celebrate some of our newly published titles. We hope to see you there!

    If you are unable to attend, we would like to provide you with a special discount offer. For the next 30 days, receive a 25% discount on all German Studies titles found on our website. At checkout, simply enter the discount code GSA16. Browse our new 2016-17 German Studies Catalog online or visit our website­ for a complete listing of all published and forthcoming titles.

     


    Below is a preview of some of our newest releases on display:

     

    Men and Motorcycling in the Weimar Republic
    Sasha Disko

    Volume 2, Explorations in Mobility

     

    During the high days of modernization fever, among the many disorienting changes Germans experienced in the Weimar Republic was an unprecedented mingling of consumption and identity: increasingly, what one bought signaled who one was. Exemplary of this volatile dynamic was the era’s burgeoning motorcycle culture. With automobiles largely a luxury of the upper classes, motorcycles complexly symbolized masculinity and freedom, embodying a widespread desire to embrace progress as well as profound anxieties over the course of social transformation. Through its richly textured account of the motorcycle as both icon and commodity, The Devil’s Wheels teases out the intricacies of gender and class in the Weimar years.

    Read Introduction: Does the man make the motorcycle or the motorcycle the man?

     

    Proposals for a New Approach to Fascism and Its Era, 1919-1945
    David D. Roberts

     

    Although studies of fascism have constituted one of the most fertile areas of historical inquiry in recent decades, more and more scholars have called for a new agenda with more research beyond Italy and Germany, less preoccupation with definition and classification, and more sustained focus on the relationships among different fascist formations before 1945. Starting from a critical assessment of these imperatives, this rigorous volume charts a historiographical path that transcends rigid distinctions while still developing meaningful criteria of differentiation. Even as we take fascism seriously as a political phenomenon, such an approach allows us to better understand its distinctive contradictions and historical variations.

    Read Preface

     

    History, Memory and Politics, 1922 to the Present
    Edited by Hugo García, Mercedes Yusta, Xavier Tabet, and Cristina Clímaco

     

    Bringing together leading scholars from a range of nations, Rethinking Antifascism provides a fascinating exploration of one of the most vibrant sub-disciplines within recent historiography. Through case studies that exemplify the field’s breadth and sophistication, it examines antifascism in two distinct realms: after surveying the movement’s remarkable diversity across nations and political cultures up to 1945, the volume assesses its postwar political and ideological salience, from its incorporation into Soviet state doctrine to its radical questioning by historians and politicians. Avoiding both heroic narratives and reflexive revisionism, these contributions offer nuanced perspectives on a movement that helped to shape the postwar world.

    Read Introduction: Beyond Revisionism: Rethinking Antifascism in the Twenty-First Century

     

    German Artisans from the Third Reich to the Federal Republic, 1939-1953
    Frederick L. McKitrick

    Volume 37, Monographs in German History

     

    Politically adrift, alienated from Weimar society, and fearful of competition from industrial elites and the working class alike, the independent artisans of interwar Germany were a particularly receptive audience for National Socialist ideology. As Hitler consolidated power, they emerged as an important Nazi constituency, drawn by the party’s rejection of both capitalism and Bolshevism. Yet, in the years after 1945, the artisan class became one of the pillars of postwar stability, thoroughly integrated into German society. From Craftsmen to Capitalists gives the first account of this astonishing transformation, exploring how skilled tradesmen recast their historical traditions and forged alliances with former antagonists to help realize German democratization and recovery.

     

    Ethical Transgressions and Anatomical Science during the Third Reich
    Sabine Hildebrandt
    Foreword by William E. Seidelman

     

    Of the many medical specializations to transform themselves during the rise of National Socialism, anatomy has received relatively little attention from historians. While politics and racial laws drove many anatomists from the profession, most who remained joined the Nazi party, and some helped to develop the scientific basis for its racialist dogma. As historian and anatomist Sabine Hildebrandt reveals, however, their complicity with the Nazi state went beyond the merely ideological. They progressed through gradual stages of ethical transgression, turning increasingly to victims of the regime for body procurement, as the traditional model of working with bodies of the deceased gave way, in some cases, to a new paradigm of experimentation with the “future dead.”

    Read Introduction 

     

    Constructing and Controlling Youth in Munich, 1942-1973
    Martin Kalb

     

    In the lean and anxious years following World War II, Munich society became obsessed with the moral condition of its youth. Initially born of the economic and social disruption of the war years, a preoccupation with juvenile delinquency progressed into a full-blown panic over the hypothetical threat that young men and women posed to postwar stability. As Martin Kalb shows in this fascinating study, constructs like the rowdy young boy and the sexually deviant girl served as proxies for the diffuse fears of adult society, while allowing authorities ranging from local institutions to the U.S. military government to strengthen forms of social control.

    Read Introduction

     

    The Arms Race, Cold War Anxiety, and the German Peace Movement of the 1980s
    Edited by Christoph Becker-Schaum, Philipp Gassert, Wilfried Mausbach, Martin Klimke, and Marianne Zepp

    Volume 19, Protest, Culture & Society

     

    In 1983, more than one million Germans joined together to protest NATO’s deployment of nuclear missiles in Europe. International media overflowed with images of marches, rallies, and human chains as protesters blockaded depots and agitated for disarmament. Though they failed to halt the deployment, the episode was a decisive one for German society, revealing deep divisions in the nation’s political culture while continuing to mobilize activists. This volume provides a comprehensive reference work on the “Euromissiles” crisis as experienced by its various protagonists, analyzing NATO’s diplomatic and military maneuvering and tracing the political, cultural, and moral discourses that surrounded the missiles’ deployment in East and West Germany.

     

    East Germany in the Cold War World
    Edited by Quinn Slobodian

    Volume 15, Protest, Culture & Society

     

    In keeping with the tenets of socialist internationalism, the political culture of the German Democratic Republic strongly emphasized solidarity with the non-white world: children sent telegrams to Angela Davis in prison, workers made contributions from their wages to relief efforts in Vietnam and Angola, and the deaths of Patrice Lumumba, Ho Chi Minh, and Martin Luther King, Jr. inspired public memorials. Despite their prominence, however, scholars have rarely examined such displays in detail. Through a series of illuminating historical investigations, this volume deploys archival research, ethnography, and a variety of other interdisciplinary tools to explore the rhetoric and reality of East German internationalism.

    Read Introduction

     

    Colonial Utopias of the Habsburg Empire
    Ulrich E. Bach

    Volume 19, Austrian and Habsburg Studies

     

    The Austrian Empire was not a colonial power in the sense that fellow actors like 19th-century England and France were. It nevertheless oversaw a multinational federation where the capital of Vienna was unmistakably linked with its eastern periphery in a quasi-colonial arrangement that inevitably shaped the cultural and intellectual life of the Habsburg Empire. This was particularly evident in the era’s colonial utopian writing, and Tropics of Vienna blends literary criticism, cultural theory, and historical analysis to illuminate this curious genre. By analyzing the works of Leopold von Sacher-Masoch, Theodor Herzl, Joseph Roth, and other representative Austrian writers, it reveals a shared longing for alternative social and spatial configurations beyond the concept of the “nation-state” prevalent at the time.

    Read Introdcution

     

    Conservation and the Politics of Wildlife in Colonial East Africa
    Bernhard Gissibl

    Volume 9, Environment in History: International Perspectives

     

    Today, the East African state of Tanzania is renowned for wildlife preserves such as the Serengeti National Park, the Ngorongoro Conservation Area, and the Selous Game Reserve. Yet few know that most of these initiatives emerged from decades of German colonial rule. This book gives the first full account of Tanzanian wildlife conservation up until World War I, focusing upon elephant hunting and the ivory trade as vital factors in a shift from exploitation to preservation that increasingly excluded indigenous Africans. Analyzing the formative interactions between colonial governance and the natural world, The Nature of German Imperialism situates East African wildlife policies within the global emergence of conservationist sensibilities around 1900.

    Read Introduction: Doorsteps in Paradise


    NEW IN PAPERBACK

    RE-IMAGINING DEFA
    East German Cinema in its National and Transnational Contexts
    Edited by Seán Allan and Sebastian Heiduschke

     

    “Looking back from what is now 25 years after reunification, this fine and original collection of essays represents a new phase in scholarship on East German films and filmmakers, one that builds on the achievements of past research while asking valuable new questions.” · Brad Prager, University of Missouri

    By the time the Berlin Wall collapsed, the cinema of the German Democratic Republic—to the extent it was considered at all—was widely regarded as a footnote to European film history, with little of enduring value. Since then, interest in East German cinema has exploded, inspiring innumerable festivals, books, and exhibits on the GDR’s rich and varied filmic output. In Re-Imagining DEFA, leading international experts take stock of this vibrant landscape and plot an ambitious course for future research, one that considers other cinematic traditions, brings genre and popular works into the fold, and encompasses DEFA’s complex post-unification “afterlife.”

     

    Points of Contact, 1250-1914
    Edited by Mischa Honeck, Martin Klimke, and Anne Kuhlmann

    Volume 15, Studies in German History

     

    “In this exciting volume, Honeck, Klimke, and Kuhlmann put forward a unique resource for the burgeoning study of the African diaspora in Germany. Comprising essaysf rom scholars working in a variety of fields, the collection fills significant gaps in the current scholarship… In detailing a phenomenon long ignored within mainstream German culture and history, this collection will be of use to a variety of readers, including those working in African and African American studies, art history, German studies, and history…Highly recommended.” · Choice

    his volume presents intersections of Black and German history over eight centuries while mapping continuities and ruptures in Germans’ perceptions of Blacks. Juxtaposing these intersections demonstrates that negative German perceptions of Blackness proceeded from nineteenth-century racial theories, and that earlier constructions of “race” were far more differentiated.

     

    The Habsburg Central European Experience
    Edited by Johannes Feichtinger and Gary B. Cohen

    Volume 17, Austrian and Habsburg Studies

     

    “Conceptually complicated and with wide-ranging empirical investigations, this volume is most likely to appeal to readers with some prior exposure to Central European history and theoretical approaches to nationalism. They will find in it plentiful food for thought.” · The American Historical Review

    The essays in this collection offer a nuanced analysis of the multifaceted cultural experience of Central Europe under the late Habsburg monarchy and beyond. The authors examine how culturally coded social spaces can be described and understood historically without adopting categories formerly employed to justify the definition and separation of groups into nations, ethnicities, or homogeneous cultures.

     

    Völkerpsychologie in Germany, 1851-1955
    Egbert Klautke

     

    “Klautke charts the historical and systematic differences between the concepts of Völkerpsychologie over a century in a book of fewer than 200 pages. Readers will consult with profit this short, but important history of ideas, science, and culture, which deals with the arguments and topics relating to Völkerpsychologie.” · German Historical Institute London Bulletin

    This book follows the invention of the discipline in the nineteenth century, its rise around the turn of the century and its ultimate demise after the Second World War. In addition, it shows that despite the repudiation of “folk psychology” and its failed institutionalization, the discipline remains relevant as a precursor of contemporary studies of “national identity.”

    Read Introduction: Völkerpsychologie in Germany

     

    German Visions of Europe, 1926-1950
    Christian Bailey

     

    “Bailey’s approach adds a thorough analysis of journals, clubs, and organizations that functioned as important intermediaries between the private and public spheres…his refreshing, well-written, and convincingly argued intellectual history complements traditional historiography.” · Choice

    An intellectual and cultural history of mid-twentieth century plans for European integration, this book calls into question the usual pre- and post-war periodizations that have structured approaches to twentieth-century European history. It focuses not simply on the ideas of leading politicians but analyses debates about Europe in “civil society” and the party-political sphere in Germany, asking if, and how, a “permissive consensus” was formed around the issue of integration. Taking Germany as its case study, the book offers context to the post-war debates, analysing the continuities that existed between interwar and post-war plans for European integration. It draws attention to the abiding scepticism of democracy displayed by many advocates of integration, indeed suggesting that groups across the ideological spectrum converged around support for European integration as a way of constraining the practice of democracy within nation-states.

    Read Introduction

     

    Nazis and Communists between Authenticity and Performance
    Timothy S. Brown

    Volume 28, Monographs in German History

     

    “Brown’s [innovative study] makes a vital contribution to an understanding of the Weimar Republic as a set of competing political stages, where radicalism was not the direct result of social or economic circumstances, but part and parcel of a deliberate dramatization of political speech.” · German History

    Exploring the gray zone of infiltration and subversion in which the Nazi and Communist parties sought to influence and undermine each other, this book offers a fresh perspective on the relationship between two defining ideologies of the twentieth century. The struggle between Fascism and Communism is situated within a broader conversation among right- and left-wing publicists, across the Youth Movement and in the “National Bolshevik” scene, thus revealing the existence of a discourse on revolutionary legitimacy fought according to a set of common assumptions about the qualities of the ideal revolutionary. Highlighting the importance of a masculine-militarist politics of youth revolt operative in both Marxist and anti-Marxist guises, Weimar Radicals forces us to re-think the fateful relationship between the two great ideological competitors of the Weimar Republic, while offering a challenging new interpretation of the distinctive radicalism of the interwar era.

    Read Chapter 1. The revolt of the masses: Populist radicalism and the discontents of modernity

     

    Studies in the History of German Conservatism, Nationalism, and Antisemitism
    Edited by Larry Eugene Jones

     

    “The essays, exceptionally readable throughout, enrich the contemporary debate through numerous new facets and questions. In contrast to other edited volumes, the contributions here are all based on rich source material, which results in a book that is interesting for the general historian as well as for the specialist.” · H-Soz-u-Kult

    Significant recent research on the German Right between 1918 and 1933 calls into question received narratives of Weimar political history. The German Right in the Weimar Republic examines the role that the German Right played in the destabilization and overthrow of the Weimar Republic, with particular emphasis on the political and organizational history of Rightist groups as well as on the many permutations of right-wing ideology during the period. In particular, antisemitism and the so-called “Jewish Question” played a prominent role in the self-definition and politics of the right-wing groups and ideologies explored by the contributors to this volume.

     

    Interpreting the Scrolls of Auschwitz
    Nicholas Chare and Dominic Williams

     

    Check out Nicholas Chare and Dominic Williams’s piece on Slate’s The Vault and also Searching for Feelings: The Scrolls of Auschwitz and Son of Saul on the Berghahn Blog.

    “This is a major book that changes the field. It is a brilliant and original work of superb historical research and profoundly affecting cultural analysis.” · Griselda Pollock, University of Leeds

    In 1944, members of the Sonderkommando—the “special squads,” composed almost exclusively of Jewish prisoners, who ensured the smooth operation of the gas chambers and had firsthand knowledge of the extermination process—buried on the grounds of Auschwitz-Birkenau a series of remarkable eyewitness accounts of Nazi genocide. This careful and penetrating study examines anew these “Scrolls of Auschwitz,” which were gradually recovered, in damaged and fragmentary form, in the years following the camp’s liberation. It painstakingly reconstructs their historical context and textual content, revealing complex literary works that resist narrow moral judgment and engage difficult questions about the limits of testimony.

    Read Introduction: Matters of Testimony

     

    New Transnational Approaches
    Edited by Norman J. W. Goda

    Volume 19, Making Sense of History

     

    “In the new history, research has been redirected from the perpetrator to the victims, and the goal is to find the authentic Jewish voice. As a consequence, personal diaries, note books, and memoirs have gained a status that traditional historians have not previously imparted to them. Good index and select bibliography. Highly Recommended.” · Choice

    For many years, histories of the Holocaust focused on its perpetrators, and only recently have more scholars begun to consider in detail the experiences of victims and survivors, as well as the documents they left behind. This volume contains new research from internationally established scholars. It provides an introduction to and overview of Jewish narratives of the Holocaust. The essays include new considerations of sources ranging from diaries and oral testimony to the hidden Oyneg Shabbes archive of the Warsaw Ghetto; arguments regarding Jewish narratives and how they fit into the larger fields of Holocaust and Genocide studies; and new assessments of Jewish responses to mass murder ranging from ghetto leadership to resistance and memory.

     

    Edited by Michael A. Grodin
    Foreword by Joseph Polak
    Afterword by Yulian Rafes

     

    “[This book] is more than simply a medical story. It is one of the most heroic and moving accounts of the Holocaust this reviewer has ever read.” · Jewish Book Council Review

    Faced with infectious diseases, starvation, lack of medicines, lack of clean water, and safe sewage, Jewish physicians practiced medicine under severe conditions in the ghettos and concentration camps of the Holocaust. Despite the odds against them, physicians managed to supply public health education, enforce hygiene protocols, inspect buildings and latrines, enact quarantine, and perform triage. Many gave their lives to help fellow prisoners. Based on archival materials and featuring memoirs of Holocaust survivors, this volume offers a rich array of both tragic and inspiring studies of the sanctification of life as practiced by Jewish medical professionals. More than simply a medical story, these histories represent the finest exemplification of a humanist moral imperative during a dark hour of recent history.

     

    The Dilemma of the Reich Association of Jews in Germany, 1939-1945
    Beate Meyer
    Translated from the German by William Templer

     

    “One of the more remarkable things about Meyer’s study is her almost total lack of criticism of the various Jewish leaders in the RJD and the RR.… Meyer sees the work of the RJD and the RR in a very different light. She argues that these Jewish leaders worked continuously through various phases of Nazi Germany’s ever-changing policies on the “Jewish Question” to find ways to ameliorate such policies…a masterful study of a phase of the Shoah that needs further exploration.” · Holocaust and Genocide Studies

    In 1939 all German Jews had to become members of a newly founded Reich Association. The Jewish functionaries of this organization were faced with circumstances and events that forced them to walk a fine line between responsible action and collaboration. They had hoped to support mass emigration, mitigate the consequences of the anti-Jewish measures, and take care of the remaining community. When the Nazis forbade emigration and started mass deportations in 1941, the functionaries decided to cooperate to prevent the “worst.” In choosing to cooperate, they came into direct opposition with the interests of their members, who were then deported. In June 1943 all unprotected Jews were deported along with their representatives, and the so-called intermediaries supplied the rest of the community, which consisted of Jews living in mixed marriages. The study deals with the tasks of these men, the fate of the Jews in mixed marriages, and what happened to the survivors after the war.

    Read Introduction

     

    Ernst Cassirer and Hannah Arendt’s Hidden Conversation
    Ned Curthoys

     

    “…an important [book], overflowing with worthwhile ideas and based upon good reading and research… Curthoys’ main theme is succinctly expressed and painfully relevant.” · European Judaism

    Comparing the liberal Jewish ethics of the German-Jewish philosophers Ernst Cassirer and Hannah Arendt, this book argues that both espoused a diasporic, worldly conception of Jewish identity that was anchored in a pluralist and politically engaged interpretation of Jewish history and an abiding interest in the complex lived reality of modern Jews. Arendt’s indebtedness to liberal Jewish thinkers such as Moses Mendelssohn, Abraham Geiger, Hermann Cohen, and Ernst Cassirer has been obscured by her modernist posture and caustic critique of the assimilationism of her German-Jewish forebears. By reorienting our conception of Arendt as a profoundly secular thinker anchored in twentieth century political debates, we are led to rethink the philosophical, political, and ethical legacy of liberal Jewish discourse.

    Read Introduction


    Spektrum Series: Publications of the German Studies Association

    Published under the auspices of the German Studies Association, Spektrum offers current perspectives on culture, society, and political life in the German-speaking lands of central Europe—Austria, Switzerland, and the Federal Republic—from the late Middle Ages to the present day. Its titles and themes reflect the composition of the GSA and the work of its members within and across the disciplines to which they belong—literary criticism, history, cultural studies, political science, and anthropology.

    RELUCTANT SKEPTIC
    Siegfried Kracauer and the Crises of Weimar Culture
    Harry T. Craver

     

    The journalist and critic Siegfried Kracauer is best remembered today for his investigations of film and other popular media, and for his seminal influence on Frankfurt School thinkers like Theodor Adorno. Less well known is his earlier work, which offered a seismographic reading of cultural fault lines in Weimar-era Germany, with an eye to the confrontation between religious revival and secular modernity. In this discerning study, historian Harry T. Craver reconstructs and richly contextualizes Kracauer’s early output, showing how he embodied the contradictions of modernity and identified the quasi-theological impulses underlying the cultural ferment on the 1920s.

     

    MIGRATIONS IN THE GERMAN LANDS, 1500-2000
    Edited by Jason Coy, Jared Poley, and Alexander Schunka

     

    Migration to, from, and within German-speaking lands has been a dynamic force in Central European history for centuries. Exemplifying some of the most exciting recent research on historical mobility, the essays collected here reconstruct the experiences of vagrants, laborers, religious exiles, refugees, and other migrants during the last five hundred years of German history. With diverse contributions ranging from early modern martyrdom to post–Cold War commemoration efforts, this volume identifies revealing commonalities shared by different eras while also placing the German case within the broader contexts of European and global migration.

     

    THE TOTAL WORK OF ART
    Foundations, Articulations, Inspirations
    Edited by David Imhoof, Margaret Eleanor Menninger, and Anthony J. Steinhoff

     

    For two centuries, Gesamtkunstwerk—the ideal of the “total work of art”—has exerted a powerful influence over artistic discourse and practice, spurring new forms of collaboration and provoking debates over the political instrumentalization of art. Despite its popular conflation with the work of Richard Wagner, Gesamtkunstwerk’s lineage and legacies extend well beyond German Romanticism, as this wide-ranging collection demonstrates. In eleven compact chapters, scholars from a variety of disciplines trace the idea’s evolution in German-speaking Europe, from its foundations in the early nineteenth century to its manifold articulations and reimaginings in the twentieth century and beyond, providing an uncommonly broad perspective on a distinctly modern cultural form.

    Read Introduction

     

    THE DEVIL’S RICHES
    A Modern History of Greed
    Jared Poley

     

    “…a thought-provoking study of a subject that is too often taken for granted, rather than subjected to critical examination.” · Financial Times

    A seeming constant in the history of capitalism, greed has nonetheless undergone considerable transformations over the last five hundred years. This multilayered account offers a fresh take on an old topic, arguing that greed was experienced as a moral phenomenon and deployed to make sense of an unjust world. Focusing specifically on the interrelated themes of religion, economics, and health—each of which sought to study and channel the power of financial desire—Jared Poley shows how evolving ideas about greed became formative elements of the modern experience.

    Read Introduction

     

    THE EMPEROR’S OLD CLOTHES
    Constitutional History and the Symbolic Language of the Holy Roman Empire
    Barbara Stollberg-Rilinger
    Translated from the German by Thomas Dunlap

     

    For many years, scholars struggled to write the history of the constitution and political structure of the Holy Roman Empire. This book argues that this was because the political and social order could not be understood without considering the rituals and symbols that held the Empire together. What determined the rules (and whether they were followed) depended on complex symbolic-ritual actions. By examining key moments in the political history of the Empire, the author shows that it was a vocabulary of symbols, not the actual written laws, that formed a political language indispensable in maintaining the common order.

    Read Introduction 

    For a full list of titles in the series please visit the series webpage


    BERGHAHN JOURNALS
    The International Yearbook of Central, Eastern, and Southeastern European Women’s and Gender History

    Aspasia is the international peer-reviewed annual of women’s and gender history of Central, Eastern, and Southeastern Europe (CESEE). It aims to transform European women’s and gender history by expanding comparative research on women and gender to all parts of Europe, creating a European history of women and gender that encompasses more than the traditional Western European perspective.

    Featured Article:
    A Woman Politician in the Cold War Balkans: From Biography to History
    Krassimira Daskalova

     

     

    The journal serves as a platform for theoretical and methodological articles as well as empirical studies on the history of concepts and their social, political, and cultural contexts. It aims to promote the dialogue between the history of concepts and other disciplines, such as intellectual history, history of knowledge and science, linguistics, translation studies, history of political thought and discourse analysis.

    Featured Article:
    The Specter of Communism: Denmark, 1848
    Bertel Nygaard

     

    German Politics and Society is a peer-reviewed journal published and distributed by Berghahn Journals. It is the only American publication that explores issues in modern Germany from the combined perspectives of the social sciences, history, and cultural studies.

    Featured Article:
    Renaissance of the New Right in Germany? A Discussion of New Right Elements in German Right-wing Extremism Today
    Samuel Salzborn

     

     

     

    Historical Reflections/Réflexions Historiques (HRRH) has established a well-deserved reputation for publishing high quality articles of wide-ranging interest for over forty years. The journal, which publishes articles in both English and French, is committed to exploring history in an interdisciplinary framework and with a comparative focus. Historical approaches to art, literature, and the social sciences; the history of mentalities and intellectual movements; the terrain where religion and history meet: these are the subjects to which HRRH is devoted.

    Featured Article:
    From Holocaust Trauma to the Dirty War
    Federico Finchelstein

     

     

    The Journal of Educational Media, Memory, and Society (JEMMS) explores perceptions of society as constituted and conveyed in processes of learning and educational media. The focus is on various types of texts (such as textbooks, museums, memorials, films) and their institutional, political, social, economic, and cultural contexts.

    Featured Article:
    “Who Wants to Be Sad Over and Over Again?” Emotion Ideologies in Contemporary German Education about the Holocaust
    Lisa Jenny Krieg

     

     

     

     

     

  • Berghahn Journals Blog

    Celebrating World Tourism Day

     

    September 27th is World Tourism Day! #WTD2016 The purpose of this day is to raise awareness on the role of tourism within the international community and to demonstrate how it affects social, cultural, political and economic values worldwide. With this in mind we present below a selection of relevant titles, and a 25% discount on all our Travel and Tourism books for the next 30 days. Simply enter discount code WTD16 at checkout.

     

    For more information on the World Tourism Day 2016 #tourism4all theme or celebration details please visit http://www.un.org/en/events/tourismday

     

     

     


    We are also pleased to offer free access (until October 5) to a collection of relevant Berghahn Journals articles, please scroll below. We hope you enjoy!


     

     

    THE ROMANCE OF CROSSING BORDERS
    Studying and Volunteering Abroad
    Edited by Neriko Doerr and Hannah Taïeb

     

    “This volume offers an exciting focus for scholarship, and one that definitely speaks to a growing area of interest in, and support for, study abroad as a necessary component of an undergraduate academic career… It offers tools for careful critique and consideration for study abroad at a moment when such tools are valuable and increasingly necessary.” · John Bodinger de Uriarte, Susquehanna University

    What draws people to study abroad or volunteer in far-off communities? Often the answer is romance – the romance of landscapes, people, languages, the very sense of border-crossing – and longing for liberation, attraction to the unknown, yearning to make a difference. This volume explores the complicated and often fraught desires to study and volunteer abroad. In doing so, the book sheds light on how affect is managed by educators and mobilized by students and volunteers themselves, and how these structures of feeling relate to broader social and economic forces.

     

     

    Valerio Simoni
    Foreword by Nelson Graburn

    Volume 38, New Directions in Anthropology

     

    “This is an important work on the ambivalence of encounters with a priori strangers in the field of tourism, an aspect of social life that has been neglected in recent anthropological literature on tourism and in general, which often remains schematic and categorical.” · David Picard

    Based on a detailed ethnography, this book explores the promises and expectations of tourism in Cuba, drawing attention to the challenges that tourists and local people face in establishing meaningful connections with each other. Notions of informal encounter and relational idiom illuminate ambiguous experiences of tourism harassment, economic transactions, hospitality, friendship, and festive and sexual relationships. Comparing these various connections, the author shows the potential of touristic encounters to redefine their moral foundations, power dynamics, and implications, offering new insights on how contemporary relationships across difference and inequality are imagined and understood.

    Read Introduction: Relating through Tourism

     

     

    New in Paperback

    TOURISM IMAGINARIES
    Anthropological Approaches
    Edited by Noel B. Salazar and Nelson H. H. Graburn
    Afterword by Naomi Leite

     

    “This book establishes ‘imaginaries’ as part of the conceptual apparatus of the anthropology of tourism [and] contributes to social anthropology more generally by exploring how tourism imaginaries intersect with broader cultural and ideological structures… The wealth of its ethnography, combined with its innovative conceptual approaches, exemplifies the strengths anthropology is bringing to interdisciplinary tourism studies.” · Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute

    As a nexus of social practices through which individuals and groups establish places and peoples as credible objects of tourism, “tourism imaginaries” have yet to be fully explored. Presenting innovative conceptual approaches, this volume advances ethnographic research methods and critical scholarship regarding tourism and the imaginaries that drive it. The various authors contribute methodologically as well as conceptually to anthropology’s grasp of the images, forces, and encounters of the contemporary world.

    Read Introduction: Toward an Anthropology of Tourism Imaginaries

     

     

    In Paperback!

    JAPANESE TOURISM
    Spaces, Places and Structures
    Carolin Funck and Malcolm Cooper

    Volume 5, Asia-Pacific Studies: Past and Present 

     

    “The volume’s scope suggests how daunting the editors’ task was, and they do a credible job, addressing issues ranging from governmental policy to heritage tourism to the possibilities of virtual tourism in the 21st century. This is a good introduction to the subject… what the authors do accomplish is significant, particularly for comparative tourism studies…Highly recommended.” · Choice

    The changing patterns of Japanese tourism and the views of the Japanese tourist since the Meiji Restoration, in 1868, are given an in-depth historical, geographical, economic and social analysis in this book. As well as providing a case study for the purpose of investigating the changing face of global tourism from the 19th to the 21st Century, this account of Japanese tourism explores both domestic social relations and international geographical, political and economic relations, especially in the northeast Asian context. Socio-cultural and geographical analysis form the research framework for the book, in three ways: first, there is an emphasis on scale as tourism phenomena and their implications are discussed both in a global context and at the national, regional and local levels; second, the discussion is informed by primary data sources such as censuses and surveys; and third, the incorporation of fieldwork and case studies adds concreteness to the overall picture of Japanese tourism. This book is a significant addition to an area of study currently under-represented in the literature.

     

     

    In Paperback!

    DANCING CULTURES
    Globalization, Tourism and Identity in the Anthropology of Dance
    Edited by Hélène Neveu Kringelbach and Jonathan Skinner

    Volume 4, Dance and Performance Studies

     

    “While globalization and tourism are included in the discussion of dance, the strength of the content is in understanding the composition of dance and the role dance plays in shaping cultures.” · Journal of Tourism and Cultural Change

    Dance is more than an aesthetic of life – dance embodies life. This is evident from the social history of jive, the marketing of trans-national ballet, ritual healing dances in Italy or folk dances performed for tourists in Mexico, Panama and Canada. Dance often captures those essential dimensions of social life that cannot be easily put into words. What are the flows and movements of dance carried by migrants and tourists? How is dance used to shape nationalist ideology? What are the connections between dance and ethnicity, gender, health, globalization and nationalism, capitalism and post-colonialism? Through innovative and wide-ranging case studies, the contributors explore the central role dance plays in culture as leisure commodity, cultural heritage, cultural aesthetic or cathartic social movement.

    Read Introduction: The Movement of Dancing Cultures

     

     

    TURNING THE TUNE
    Traditional Music, Tourism, and Social Change in an Irish Village
    Adam Kaul

    Volume 3, Dance and Performance Studies

     

    “The publication of this study is a valuable contribution to the discipline of ethnomusicology and the study of Irish traditional music and tourism within this context. This book is particularly valuable to those interested in the study of Irish traditional music from the ethnomusicological perspective, and students and teachers of these areas will be greatly enhanced by Kaul’s in-depth knowledge of tourism literature.” · Ethnomusicology Forum

    The author focuses on a small village in County Clare, which became a kind of pilgrimage site for those interested in experiencing traditional music. He begins by tracing its historical development from the days prior to the influx of visitors, through a period called “the Revival,” in which traditional Irish music was revitalized and transformed, to the modern period, which is dominated by tourism. A large number of incomers, locally known as “blow-ins,” have moved to the area, and the traditional Irish music is now largely performed and passed on by them. This fine-grained ethnographic study explores the commercialization of music and culture, the touristic consolidation and consumption of “place,” and offers a critique of the trope of “authenticity,” all in a setting of dramatic social change in which the movement of people is constant.

     

     

    Wolfgang Koeppen
    Translated and with an Introduction by Michael Kimmage

    Volume 1, Transatlantic Perspectives

     

    “[In] excellent translation of Koeppen’s Amerikafahrt… [the author] traces his travels across the US as he reflects on the state of American culture and its meaning for the future of the Western world…Everywhere he sees technical and material progress but wonders if that will be used for public enlightenment or centralized money-driven consumerism. Seeing the Statue of Liberty, he wonders which symbol predominates, her torch or her unseeing eyes. Given the polarity of contemporary America, Koeppen’s interrogation of life in the US resonates today as well as it did when first published…Highly recommended.” · Choice

    Amerikafahrt by Wolfgang Koeppen is a masterpiece of observation, analysis, and writing, based on his 1958 trip to the United States. A major twentieth-century German writer, Koeppen presents a vivid and fascinating portrait of the US in the late 1950s: its major cities, its literary culture, its troubled race relations, its multi-culturalism and its vast loneliness, a motif drawn, in part, from Kafka’s Amerika. A modernist travelogue, the text employs symbol, myth, and image, as if Koeppen sought to answer de Tocqueville’s questions in the manner of Joyce and Kafka. Journey through America is also a meditation on America, intended for a German audience and mindful of the destiny of postwar Europe under many Americanizing influences.

     

     

    In Paperback!

    TOURISM, MAGIC AND MODERNITY
    Cultivating the Human Garden
    David Picard
    Foreword by Nelson Graburn

    Volume 32, New Directions in Anthropology

     

    “The book demonstrates that the ethnographic genre can be effective in advancing a deeper, more thickly described account of tourism at the same time as tourism offers an advantageous lens through which to understand the cultural politics of globalization generally…Its greatest contribution would seem to be a new way of theorizing the complex conjunctions of nature and culture that so often orientalize host societies in tourism imaginaries.” · Annals of Tourism Research

    Drawing from extended fieldwork in La Réunion, in the Indian Ocean, the author suggests an innovative re-reading of different concepts of magic that emerge in the global cultural economics of tourism. Following the making and unmaking of the tropical island tourism destination of La Réunion, he demonstrates how destinations are transformed into magical pleasure gardens in which human life is cultivated for tourist consumption. Like a gardener would cultivate flowers, local development policy, nature conservation, and museum initiatives dramatise local social life so as to evoke modernist paradigms of time, beauty and nature. Islanders who live in this ‘human garden’ are thus placed in the ambivalent role of ‘human flowers’, embodying ideas of authenticity and biblical innocence, but also of history and social life in perpetual creolisation.

     

     

    Imagination and Anticipation in Tourism
    Edited by Jonathan Skinner and Dimitrios Theodossopoulos

    Volume 34, New Directions in Anthropology 

     

    The negotiation of expectations in tourism is a complex and dynamic process – one that is central to the imagination of cultural difference. Expectations not only affect the lives and experiences of tourists, but also their hosts, and play an important part in the success or failure of the overall tourism experience. It is for this reason, the authors argue, that special attention should be given to how expectations constitute and sustain tourism. The case studies presented here explore what fuels the desires to visit particular places, to what degree expectations inform the experience of the place, and the frequent disjunctions between tourist expectations and experiences. Careful attention is paid to how the imagination of the visitor inspires the imagination of the host, and vice-versa; how tourists and host communities actively imagine, re-imagine, and shape each other’s lives. This realization, has profound consequences, not solely for academic analysis, but for all those who participate in and work within the tourism industry.

     

     

    ENVISIONING EDEN
    Mobilizing Imaginaries in Tourism and Beyond
    Noel B. Salazar

    Volume 31, New Directions in Anthropology

     

    “This is a well-written and rewarding book which offers an intriguing insight not only into the world of tour guides, but also into the kinship between anthropology and tour guiding. It will be of interest to anthropologists of tourism, as well as to those with an interest in the cultures of globalization and cosmopolitanism.” · Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute

    As tourism service standards become more homogeneous, travel destinations worldwide are conforming yet still trying to maintain, or even increase, their distinctiveness. Based on more than two years of fieldwork in Yogyakarta, Indonesia and Arusha, Tanzania, this book offers an in-depth investigation of the local-to-global dynamics of contemporary tourism. Each destination offers examples that illustrate how tour guide narratives and practices are informed by widely circulating imaginaries of the past as well as personal imaginings of the future.

     


     

    BERGHAHN JOURNALS

     

     

    Journeys
    The International Journal of Travel & Travel Writing

    Journeys is an interdisciplinary journal that explores travel as a practice and travel writing as a genre, reflecting the rich diversity of travel and journeys as social and cultural practices as well as their significance as metaphorical processes.

    Free Conference Review: Anthropology of Tourism: Heritage and Perspectives (available until 10/5/16)

     

    Anthropology in Action
    Journal for Applied Anthropology in Policy and Practice

    Anthropology in Action is a peer-reviewed journal publishing articles, commentaries, research reports, and book reviews in applied anthropology.

    Free Article: Tourism for Peace? Reflections on a Village Tourism Project in Cyprus (available until 10/5/16)

     

    The Cambridge Journal of Anthropology

    The Cambridge Journal of Anthropology is an international, peer-reviewed journal committed to publishing leading scholarship in contemporary anthropology

    Free Article: Intimacy and Belonging in Cuban Tourism and Migration (available until 10/5/16)

     

    Mobility in History
    The Yearbook of the International Association for the History of Transport, Traffic and Mobility

    Mobility in History provides an essential and comprehensive overview of the current situation of Mobility studies.

    Featured Article: War as Tourism Attraction: Approaching a Segment in Tourism Research (available until 10/5/16)

     

    Transfers
    Interdisciplinary Journal of Mobility Studies

    Transfers is a peer-reviewed journal publishing cutting-edge research on the processes, structures and consequences of the movement of people, resources, and commodities.

    Featured Article: Gendered Experiences of Mobility: Travel Behavior of Middle-class Women in Dhaka City (available until 10/5/16)

     

  • Berghahn Journals Blog

    Visit the Berghahn Books Stand at Historikertag 2016

     

     

    If you are unable to attend, we would like to provide you with a special discount offer. For the next 30 days, receive a 25% discount on all History titles found on our website. At checkout, simply enter the code HTAG16.

    To browse our latest History titles, please see our 2016 History Catalogue or visit our website for a complete listing of all published and forthcoming titles.

    Below is a preview of some of our newest releases on display.

     


    NEW

    Ethical Transgressions and Anatomical Science during the Third Reich
    Sabine Hildebrandt
    Foreword by William E. Seidelman

     

    Of the many medical specializations to transform themselves during the rise of National Socialism, anatomy has received relatively little attention from historians. While politics and racial laws drove many anatomists from the profession, most who remained joined the Nazi party, and some helped to develop the scientific basis for its racialist dogma. As historian and anatomist Sabine Hildebrandt reveals, however, their complicity with the Nazi state went beyond the merely ideological. They progressed through gradual stages of ethical transgression, turning increasingly to victims of the regime for body procurement, as the traditional model of working with bodies of the deceased gave way, in some cases, to a new paradigm of experimentation with the “future dead.”

    Read Introduction

     

    Colonial Utopias of the Habsburg Empire
    Ulrich E. Bach

    Volume 19, Austrian and Habsburg Studies

     

    The Austrian Empire was not a colonial power in the sense that fellow actors like 19th-century England and France were. It nevertheless oversaw a multinational federation where the capital of Vienna was unmistakably linked with its eastern periphery in a quasi-colonial arrangement that inevitably shaped the cultural and intellectual life of the Habsburg Empire. This was particularly evident in the era’s colonial utopian writing, and Tropics of Vienna blends literary criticism, cultural theory, and historical analysis to illuminate this curious genre. By analyzing the works of Leopold von Sacher-Masoch, Theodor Herzl, Joseph Roth, and other representative Austrian writers, it reveals a shared longing for alternative social and spatial configurations beyond the concept of the “nation-state” prevalent at the time.

    Read Introduction

     

    East Germany in the Cold War World
    Edited by Quinn Slobodian

    Volume 15, Protest, Culture & Society

     

    In keeping with the tenets of socialist internationalism, the political culture of the German Democratic Republic strongly emphasized solidarity with the non-white world: children sent telegrams to Angela Davis in prison, workers made contributions from their wages to relief efforts in Vietnam and Angola, and the deaths of Patrice Lumumba, Ho Chi Minh, and Martin Luther King, Jr. inspired public memorials. Despite their prominence, however, scholars have rarely examined such displays in detail. Through a series of illuminating historical investigations, this volume deploys archival research, ethnography, and a variety of other interdisciplinary tools to explore the rhetoric and reality of East German internationalism.

    Read Introduction

     

    Poverty, Welfare and Social Ties in Modern Europe
    Edited by Beate Althammer, Lutz Raphael, and Tamara Stazic-Wendt

    Volume 27, International Studies in Social History

     

    In many ways, the European welfare state constituted a response to the new forms of social fracture and economic turbulence that were born out of industrialization—challenges that were particularly acute for groups whose integration into society seemed the most tenuous. Covering a range of national cases, this volume explores the relationship of weak social ties to poverty and how ideas about this relationship informed welfare policies in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. By focusing on three representative populations—neglected children, the homeless, and the unemployed—it provides a rich, comparative consideration of the shifting perceptions, representations, and lived experiences of social vulnerability in modern Europe.

    Read Introduction: Poverty and Endangered Social Ties: An Introduction

     

    Science, Everyday Life, and Working-Class Politics in the Bohemian Lands, 1914–1918
    Rudolf Kučera

     

    Far from the battlefront, hundreds of thousands of workers toiled in Bohemian factories over the course of World War I, and their lives were inescapably shaped by the conflict. In particular, they faced new and dramatic forms of material hardship that strained social ties and placed in sharp relief the most mundane aspects of daily life, such as when, what, and with whom to eat. This study reconstructs the experience of the Bohemian working class during the Great War through explorations of four basic spheres—food, labor, gender, and protest—that comprise a fascinating case study in early twentieth-century social history.

    Read Introduction

     

    Industrial Associations between Democracy and Dictatorship
    Matt Bera
    From 1933 onward, Nazi Germany undertook massive and unprecedented industrial integration, submitting an entire economic sector to direct state oversight. This innovative study explores how German professionals navigated this complex landscape through the divergent careers of business managers in two of the era’s most important trade organizations. While Jakob Reichert of the iron and steel industry unexpectedly resisted state control and was eventually driven to suicide, Karl Lange of the machine builders’ association achieved security for himself and his industry by submitting to the Nazi regime. Both men’s stories illuminate the options available to industrialists under the Third Reich, as well as the real priorities set by the industries they served.

    Read Introduction: Adaptation and Opposition in Democracy and Dictatorship

     


    NEW IN PAPERBACK

     

    Forthcoming in Paperback! 

    MATTERS OF TESTIMONY
    Interpreting the Scrolls of Auschwitz
    Nicholas Chare and Dominic Williams

     

    Check out Nicholas Chare and Dominic Williams’s piece on Slate’s The Vault and also Searching for Feelings: The Scrolls of Auschwitz and Son of Saul on the Berghahn Blog.

    “This is a major book that changes the field. It is a brilliant and original work of superb historical research and profoundly affecting cultural analysis.” · Griselda Pollock, University of Leeds

    In 1944, members of the Sonderkommando—the “special squads,” composed almost exclusively of Jewish prisoners, who ensured the smooth operation of the gas chambers and had firsthand knowledge of the extermination process—buried on the grounds of Auschwitz-Birkenau a series of remarkable eyewitness accounts of Nazi genocide. This careful and penetrating study examines anew these “Scrolls of Auschwitz,” which were gradually recovered, in damaged and fragmentary form, in the years following the camp’s liberation. It painstakingly reconstructs their historical context and textual content, revealing complex literary works that resist narrow moral judgment and engage difficult questions about the limits of testimony.

    Read Introduction: Matters of Testimony

     

    Points of Contact, 1250-1914
    Edited by Mischa Honeck, Martin Klimke, and Anne Kuhlmann

    Volume 15, Studies in German History

     

    “In this exciting volume, Honeck, Klimke, and Kuhlmann put forward a unique resource for the burgeoning study of the African diaspora in Germany. Comprising essaysf rom scholars working in a variety of fields, the collection fills significant gaps in the current scholarship… In detailing a phenomenon long ignored within mainstream German culture and history, this collection will be of use to a variety of readers, including those working in African and African American studies, art history, German studies, and history…Highly recommended.” · Choice

    The rich history of encounters prior to World War I between people from German-speaking parts of Europe and people of African descent has gone largely unnoticed in the historical literature—not least because Germany became a nation and engaged in colonization much later than other European nations. This volume presents intersections of Black and German history over eight centuries while mapping continuities and ruptures in Germans’ perceptions of Blacks. The contributors present a wide range of Black–German encounters, from representations of Black saints in religious medieval art to Black Hessians fighting in the American Revolutionary War, from Cameroonian children being educated in Germany to African American agriculturalists in Germany’s protectorate, Togoland.

     

    Völkerpsychologie in Germany, 1851-1955
    Egbert Klautke

     

    “Klautke provides readers both with useful biographical summaries and with cogent accounts of his protagonists’ specific interpretations of Völkerpsychologie. But he also expands his narrative horizon beyond mere intellectual biography. Laudably, he pays special attention to the broader reception of their writings in an attempt to correct the misperception that Völkerpsychologie was merely ‘political propaganda dressed up as a social science’.” · German History

    Völkerpsychologie played an important role in establishing the social sciences via the works of such scholars as Georg Simmel, Emile Durkheim, Ernest Renan, Franz Boas, and Werner Sombart. In Germany, the intellectual history of “folk psychology” was represented by Moritz Lazarus, Heymann Steinthal, Wilhelm Wundt and Willy Hellpach. This book follows the invention of the discipline in the nineteenth century, its rise around the turn of the century and its ultimate demise after the Second World War.

    Read Introduction: Völkerpsychologie in Germany

     

    Studies in the History of German Conservatism, Nationalism, and Antisemitism
    Edited by Larry Eugene Jones

     

    “The strength of this collection is its engagement with this ideological and institutional diversity… Though not intended for general readers (who will find relatively little about Hitler and the Nazis here), specialists will benefit from this volume’s exploration of the ideas that shaped the German Right and the ways that their spokesmen negotiated their ideological differences during a period of profound societal crisis.” · Choice

    The German Right in the Weimar Republic examines the role that the German Right played in the destabilization and overthrow of the Weimar Republic, with particular emphasis on the political and organizational history of Rightist groups as well as on the many permutations of right-wing ideology during the period. In particular, antisemitism and the so-called “Jewish Question” played a prominent role in the self-definition and politics of the right-wing groups and ideologies explored by the contributors to this volume.

    Read Introduction: The German Right in the Weimar Republic: New Directions, New Insights, New Challenges

     

    Ethnic Cleansing in Modern Europe
    Philipp Ther

    Volume 19, War and Genocide

     

    “This is a very fine book worthy of wide scholarly attention. Unlike most other scholars, who see genocide and ethnic cleansing as closely interrelated, Philipp Ther emphasizes the differences between them… I admire its clarity and succinctness and the mastery of a vast material demonstrated by its author. His erudition and courage let him make new and surprising connections and offer truly illuminating insights.” · Slavic Review

    Almost all mass-scale population removals were rationally and precisely organized and carried out in cold blood, with revenge, hatred and other strong emotions playing only a minor role. This book not only considers the majority of population removals which occurred in Eastern Europe, but is also an encompassing, comparative study including Western Europe, interrogating the motivations of Western statesmen and their involvement in large-scale population removals. It also reaches beyond the European continent and considers the reverberations of colonial rule and ethnic cleansing in the former British colonies.

    Read Introduction

     

    Johann Gustav Droysen and the Functions of Historiography
    Arthur Alfaix Assis

    Volume 17, Making Sense of History

     

    “Assis offers the reader a wide panorama of German historiography during the nineteenth century, centering on the debates about historicism, a dominant paradigm for German historical knowledge in the nineteenth century, and in the reformulation of pragmatic value for historiography. Arthur Assis’ work is therefore not only directed at specialists or at researchers of Droysen’s work, but at all those who study German and general historiography, intellectual history, and even political historiography, since it highlights the political influences of Droysen’s thought.” · Revista Brasileira de História

    A scholar of Hellenistic and Prussian history, Droysen developed a historical theory that at the time was unprecedented in range and depth, and which remains to the present day a valuable key for understanding history as both an idea and a professional practice. Arthur Alfaix Assis interprets Droysen’s theoretical project as an attempt to redefine the function of historiography within the context of a rising criticism of exemplar theories of history, and focuses on Droysen’s claim that the goal underlying historical writing and reading should be the development of the subjective capacity to think historically.

     

    Strategies and Performances from the 1960s to the Present
    Edited by Kathrin Fahlenbrach, Erling Sivertsen & Rolf Werenskjold

    Volume 11, Protest, Culture & Society

     

    ”…a timely, truly interdisciplinary, and much needed volume on the relationship between (mass) media, social movements and protests.”  ·  Peter N. Funke, University of South Florida

    In what ways have social movements attracted the attention of the mass media since the sixties? How have activists influenced public attention via visual symbols, images, and protest performances in that period? And how do mass media cover and frame specific protest issues? Drawing on contributions from media scholars, historians, and sociologists, this volume explores the dynamic interplay between social movements, activists, and mass media from the 1960s to the present. It introduces the most relevant theoretical approaches to such issues and offers a variety of case studies ranging from print media, film, and television to Internet and social media.
    German Visions of Europe, 1926-1950
    Christian Bailey

     

    “Bailey’s book opens long-term perspectives, and offers a thorough analysis of selected non-dominant ideas about Europe in Germany in the 1940s and 1950s.” · European History Quarterly

    An intellectual and cultural history of mid-twentieth century plans for European integration, this book calls into question the usual pre- and post-war periodizations that have structured approaches to twentieth-century European history. It focuses not simply on the ideas of leading politicians but analyses debates about Europe in “civil society” and the party-political sphere in Germany, asking if, and how, a “permissive consensus” was formed around the issue of integration. Taking Germany as its case study, the book offers context to the post-war debates, analysing the continuities that existed between interwar and post-war plans for European integration. It draws attention to the abiding scepticism of democracy displayed by many advocates of integration, indeed suggesting that groups across the ideological spectrum converged around support for European integration as a way of constraining the practice of democracy within nation-states.

    Read Introduction

     

    Comparative Perspectives
    Edited by Steven King and Anne Winter

    Volume 23, International Studies in Social History
    “…a valuable and engaging contribution to historical debates about labor, poverty, relief, and belonging…[The papers] are written by leaders in their fields…and pulled together [by the editors] in an elegant and convincing treatment of the case for such a geographical spread.” · Alannah Tomkins, University of Keele

    This volume offers a pan-European survey that encompasses Switzerland, Prussia, Belgium, the Netherlands, and Britain. It explores how the conception of belonging changed over time and space from the 1500s onwards, how communities dealt with the welfare expectations of an increasingly mobile population that migrated both within and between states, the welfare rights that were attached to those who “belonged,” and how ordinary people secured access to welfare resources.

    Read Introduction: Settlement and Belonging in Europe, 1600-1950: Structures, Negotiations and Experiences


    BERGHAHN JOURNALS

    Aspasia
    The International Yearbook of Central, Eastern, and Southeastern European Women’s and Gender History

    Aspasia is the international peer-reviewed annual of women’s and gender history of Central, Eastern, and Southeastern Europe (CESEE). It aims to transform European women’s and gender history by expanding comparative research on women and gender to all parts of Europe, creating a European history of women and gender that encompasses more than the traditional Western European perspective.

    Contributions to the History of Concepts

    Contributions to the History of Concepts is the international peer-reviewed journal of the History of Concepts Group (formerly HPSCG). The journal serves as a platform for theoretical and methodological articles as well as empirical studies on the history of concepts and their social, political, and cultural contexts.

    French Politics, Culture & Society

    FPC&S is the journal of the Conference Group on French Politics & Society. FPC&S explores modern and contemporary France from the perspectives of the social sciences, history, and cultural analysis. It also examines France’s relationship to the larger world, especially Europe, the United States, and the former French Empire.

    German Politics and Society

    GPS is a joint publication of the BMW Center for German and European Studies (of the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service, Georgetown University) and the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD). The journal provides a forum for critical analysis and debate about politics, history, film, literature, visual arts, and popular culture in contemporary Germany.

    Historical Reflections/Réflexions Historiques

    HRRH has established a well-deserved reputation for publishing high quality articles of wide-ranging interest for over forty years. The journal, which publishes articles in both English and French, is committed to exploring history in an interdisciplinary framework and with a comparative focus.

    Journal of Educational Media, Memory, and Society

    JEMMS explores perceptions of society as constituted and conveyed in processes of learning and educational media. The focus is on various types of texts (such as textbooks, museums, memorials, films) and their institutional, political, social, economic, and cultural contexts. The construction of collective memory and conceptions of space, the production of meaning, image formation, forms of representation, and perceptions of the “self” and the “other,” as well as processes of identity construction (ethnic, national, regional, religious, institutional, gender) are of particular interest.

     

Top Article Downloads


  1. Under the Shadow of Empire: Indigenous Girls' Presencing as Decolonizing Force
    Girlhood Studies, vol. 7, #1, Summer 2014
  2. Forget Dawkins: Notes toward an Ethnography of Religious Belief and Doubt
    Social Analysis, vol. 59, #2, Summer 2015
  3. Blaming Sexualization for Sexting
    Girlhood Studies, vol. 7, #1, Summer 2014
  4. Out of the Closet? German Patriotism and Soccer Mania
    German Politics & Society, vol.24, #3, Autumn 2006
  5. Rape Culture and the Feminist Politics of Social Media
    Girlhood Studies, vol. 7, #1, Summer 2014
  6. Less Than One But More Than Many: Anthropocene as Science Fiction and Scholarship-in-the-Making
    Environment and Society, vol. 6, #1, Summer 2015
  7. Staging "small, small incidents": Dissent, gender, and militarization among young people in Kashmir
    Focaal, vol. 2011, #60, Summer 2011
  8. An Inquiry into the Roots of the Modern Concept of Development
    Contributions to the History of Concepts, vol. 4, #2, Autumn 2008
  9. Misunderstood, misrepresented, contested? Anthropological knowledge production in question
    Focaal, vol. 2015, #72, Summer 2015
  10. Theatres of virtue: Collaboration, consensus, and the social life of corporate social responsibility
    Focaal, vol. 2011, #60, Summer 2011

Berghahn Collections

Libraries may purchase at a special discount (with the option to purchase the backfiles in addition) the entire Berghahn collection or Berghahn journals bundled by subjects.

Berghahn Journals New Online Platform

Berghahn Journals is pleased to announce the launch of our new journals online platform starting April 1. We will be working with all subscribers to make the transition process as seamless as possible and will contact you in the coming weeks with more information about access procedures.

March 31 is the last day Berghahn will be hosting its journal content on IngentaConnect. Starting April 1, all Berghahn journal content will be hosted by PubFactory on the new Berghahn Online platform.

Berghahn Online will offer a high-performing platform with the following innovative features and services in addition to those already offered to Institutional Users

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  • Seamless content authorization based on institutional IP address
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  • More purchase options for custom journal collections
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